Bolt EV DCFC at home
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Thread: Bolt EV DCFC at home

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by somms View Post
    10KW CCS Combo Portable Charger

    Every Bolt sold with DCFC option should come equipped with its own CCS Portable Charger IMHO!
    It says it only supports 30 amp draw on a single phase circuit. So it is no better than just using the Bolts onboard charger - which supports a 32 amp draw...
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  2. #22
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    Oct 2012
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    kansas city
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    Quote Originally Posted by Off Oil View Post
    An installation doesn't make sense unless it gets a lot of use. Can you add it to your house, sure. Should you? Not unless you have lots of money you don't need, in which case I'll accept a donation.
    I suspect these units have a lot more robust build for an external install as well as all manner of bells and whistles not required for a home install. I bet it can be made a lot cheaper for interior residential type install. They will go through the cost reduction cycle that L2 chargers have/are going through.

    Its not just a question of high use. Think about it. A 150kw battery for a heavy duty truck/SUV would take ~24 hours to full charge on present 7.2kw L2 chargers. Even a 25KW DCFC would take ~ 6 hours to full charge.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by theo1000 View Post
    I suspect these units have a lot more robust build for an external install as well as all manner of bells and whistles not required for a home install. I bet it can be made a lot cheaper for interior residential type install. They will go through the cost reduction cycle that L2 chargers have/are going through.
    Uhm... how much HAVE L2 chargers gone through? On an apples-to-apples basis, I mean. A Clipper Creek LCS-25P has gone from being a $1000 item to being a $500 item in five years, but almost all of that was basically "Oops, we have someone to compete with now" and they were less than $600 by 2013. It's not like 25 feet of flex-tolerant cable has gotten cheaper, and the cost of injection-molding a housing doesn't really change when you're only buying them a container load per year instead of per week. So thinking about how much power-handling materials for 25kw cost may be revealing for just how cheap DCFC actually can get. It might not be as flexible as one might like. Maybe it'll NEVER cost less than $5k just because you just need this much copper and this much steel tubing and you have to have a fireproof housing so it can never be injection-molded plastic and will always be a bent sheet-steel assembly, there always has to be a 100amp safety disconnect and those just cost $50 even when you buy a thousand of them, example etc.

    Its not just a question of high use. Think about it. A 150kw battery for a heavy duty truck/SUV would take ~24 hours to full charge on present 7.2kw L2 chargers. Even a 25KW DCFC would take ~ 6 hours to full charge.
    6 hours is plenty for "overnight". But most "heavy duty" trucks (in quotes because DOT says they're still light trucks) drive even few miles on average per year than cars do. And we know how little that is because that's what Volts are scoped to handle.
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  6. #24
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    A pickup truck will not need a 150kWh battery.

    An easy estimate would be to compare focus vs focus EV - the car is basically unchanged except battery shoehorned in vs purpose built products like i3 and Bolt that have no real comparator.
    Using EPA combined values:
    29MPG focus = 115mi/30kWh BEV
    Guzzling 5.0L F150 = 16 MPG
    1.8125x more energy required to drive the F150 than the focus = 54.4kWh, lets say 60kWh.

    So your 150kWh battery would be more miles than a Bolt, which is already well above what any one person would do in a day to require home charging to full every night in 8h.
    Any long distance travel would be at a commercial DCFC station, again negating the need to have one at home.

    You size the charging to your charging needs, not to be able to refill your entire battery in one night that might happen once in a blue moon.
    I could have a 150kWh battery and still use my LCS-25 happily every day, even if I drained it to empty one night. By morning I'd have more than enough juice to get me to work and back several times over. My battery would slowly fill each night I charge it with excess. I have no need to be topped up to max in one night, and 99% of the world doesn't either.
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  7. #25
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    Oct 2012
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    All good points. We will have to see how it shakes out. Just don't dismiss Residential DCFC out of hand is all I'm saying....

    WRT the 150kw battery [not kwh btw ] I'm thinking more in terms of towing and the work loads I put my Tundra through on a weekly basis. You know the need and more important the upsell desire is going to be there.

  8. #26
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    Just wanted to add IF DCFC from a home battery to an EV ever becomes a thing, the capacity of the home battery does not need to be the same or greater than the EV battery.

    For example if you have a 60kWh battery EV you could still DCFC it from a home 10, 15, or 20kWh storage battery to quickly regain some miles.
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