Turning Seawater into Jet Fuel In the Navy!
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Thread: Turning Seawater into Jet Fuel In the Navy!

  1. #1
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    Default Turning Seawater into Jet Fuel In the Navy!

    Imagine this! It is feasible, but you would basically turn nuclear power into electricity then produce the jet fuel from seawater at $3-$6/gallon. Considering that it costs more than $10/gallon to deliver the fuel, this would be nice. At least this is carbon neutral. They can also generate electricity from temperature difference of the deep and the surface of the ocean. This can be extended to other applications. Details of technology is partially revealed below:




    U.S. Navy Uses Seawater to Make Jet Fuel on the Go
    September 26, 2012 By Tina Casey

    Imagine a fighting force that can scavenge its own fuel as it marches along, and you’re either thinking about the Continental Army’s march to Yorktown or the U.S. Navy not too many years in the future. Scientists at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington are working on a process that can produce jet fuel from seawater. It sounds like something that would give the U.S. a powerful edge in action, so let’s call this Round 3 in the Navy’s efforts to free itself from dependency on fossil fuels.

    Complete story here:
    http://cleantechnica.com/2012/09/26/...from-seawater/


    The above may have a nasty pop-up if you don't have a pop-up blocker.
    Here are other links but less technology details:
    http://www.nbcnews.com/technology/fu...t-fuel-6206723
    http://defensetech.org/2012/10/02/co...navy-jet-fuel/

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    Great article. Thanks. This isn't applicable to outside the military because only the military can afford (for now) to make fuel having a negative EROEI or net-energy.... It saves lives though. I'm going to guess that the $3-$6 per gallon isn't taking into account all the energy cost inputs.... just my guess.

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    I read the article several times and it seems they included everything, including the interest on capital investment on the equipment or amortized over the life of the project.

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    One question... from the article the writer states "NRL has been developing an electrochemical acidification cell based on chlorine dioxide. It works by using small amounts of electricity to acidify seawater, forming sodium hydroxide." Sodium hydroxide is a caustic, not an acid. What am I missing?
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmcc View Post
    One question... from the article the writer states "NRL has been developing an electrochemical acidification cell based on chlorine dioxide. It works by using small amounts of electricity to acidify seawater, forming sodium hydroxide." Sodium hydroxide is a caustic, not an acid. What am I missing?
    A lot of people refer to anything that is not a pH of 7 as acidic. Acidic or Basic, either way it will cause chemical burns, so a lot of people don't know the difference.
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    You're missing the fact that the reaction produces an Hydroxide, also depending on which scale you use to judge acidity even a strong caustic can sometimes be considered what's called a Lewis Acid because it's ranked on a different scale based on free electrons or free OH ions. Google Lewis acids and bases . That might just make you more confused I know it did confuse me in Freshman Chemistry. BUt I know the Lewis scale has to do with free protons and electron pairs rather than Hydrogen and Hydroxide ions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mmcc View Post
    One question... from the article the writer states "NRL has been developing an electrochemical acidification cell based on chlorine dioxide. It works by using small amounts of electricity to acidify seawater, forming sodium hydroxide." Sodium hydroxide is a caustic, not an acid. What am I missing?
    The acidification part is needed to release the hydrogen, and of course when you release the hydrogen, you produce hydroxyl and in the presence of sodium is caustic. It is like when water is dissociated into H+ and OH- and just because there is an H+ as a product, you call it acidic, and because there is OH- as a product, you call it caustic? There are in fact different steps and different products, and one important part is the electrochemical acidification, and it's by product is forming sodium hydroxide which can become caustic.

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