CPS getting out ahead of the curve...
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Thread: CPS getting out ahead of the curve...

  1. #1
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    Default CPS getting out ahead of the curve...

    SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS: View "CPS is curbing carbon footprint"

    CPS (CPSEnergy) is the sole-source for electricity (and NatGas for all but a few towns in the county) for the greater-San Antonio metro area.

    Texas may be getting rich off its oil and natural gas — once again — but it’s living more and more off renewable energy.

    Wind and solar sources made up a little more than a third of the new electricity generation coming online since 1995, with completed and announced green-power plants accounting for 22,000 megawatts, according to the state Public Utilities Commission.
    CPS — the largest municipally owned utility in the country — also wants an attaboy for plans to shutter its coal-fired Deely Plant in 2018, about 15 years ahead of schedule, and to replace its capacity with the cleaner, natural gas-fired Rio Nogales plant near Seguin.

    But those are concerns on the margin. The utility isn’t questioning the EPA’s power to impose the mandate.

    “We are not focusing on whether it has that authority,” said Doyle Beneby, CPS’ chief executive. “There is an air of inevitability about this, and we have to protect our community. . . The issue is settled.”

    The EPA’s emissions rules, he noted, didn’t come out of the blue. States and electricity generators have known for years that they were coming down the pike.
    Norm

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  2. #2
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    Default "CPS to buy ‘clean-coal’ power"

    SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS: View "CPS to buy ‘clean-coal’ power"


    The plant is expected to capture 90 percent of the carbon produced during power generation, and Summit has contracts to sell it to three oil companies in the Permian Basin. The carbon is used in processes that increase crude oil extraction.

    Summit will also sell sulfuric acid and fertilizer produced at the plant, which will be built about 15 miles from Odessa.
    “Adding clean coal to our portfolio dovetails with our strategies to diversify and reduce the carbon intensity of the power we supply to our customers.”
    Doyle Beneby, CPS Energy CEO
    Norm

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    Default Another local company also getting out ahead of that curve.

    Capturing carbon to be used elsewhere

    Capitol SkyMine next to cement plant is dedicated

    ...The cement plant emits carbon dioxide from burning coal in the cement-making process.

    ...Because the manufacture of the byproducts elsewhere normally results in greenhouse emissions, Skyonic says it is saving an additional 225,000 tons of carbon dioxide emissions yearly from occurring. The total of 300,000 tons of carbon savings yearly is equal to removing 62,000 passenger cars from roads, according to the company.

    ... SkyCycle, a demonstration project, will increase the plant’s capacity by only 7 percent when it goes into operation in late 2015. But the SkyCycle technology is expected to capture carbon dioxide from factory smokestacks at between $16 and $25 per ton, lower than current costs of $150-$450 per ton, the company said.
    Of the 9 largest metro areas of Texas, San Antonio is the largest city that is not in one of the EPA's "Nonattainment Areas." We've come close to losing that status when the wind brings smoke from the clearing of farmland in Mexico and Brazil blows in. Hopefully this will help us maintain our clean(er) air.
    Norm

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    Default CPS Energy prepared for Obama’s Clean Power Plan

    SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS: View "CPS Energy prepared for Obama’s Clean Power Plan" article at http://tablet.olivesoftware.com/Oliv...F04&id=Ar01507

    As stated above, our utility company is still ahead of the curve on this. Rather than bellyache about it, they took actions to find solutions. And we still have modest rates.
    Norm

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    Hi Norm,

    I always watched your posts, on GMV, and am actively following this weeks EPA CPP roll-out. (Not coming around here, so much anymore).

    As to carbon capture, I'd try to steer CPS away from "clean coal" as it relates to CO2, as it is highly suspect technology. Certainly, not the stuff municipal utilities should approach. So far, all boondoggles. "Future Gen" and the MS Kemper IGCC plant, both made tall claims. Nothing but bills are panning out for rate-payers attached to any of this stuff.

    Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a joke, in relation to the sheer volumes of CO2 coming from a coal power plant. This is key. A 1,000MW coal plant can spew 24,000 tons of CO2 per day. Contracts with firms, like Denby resources, frequently amount to only 500 tons/day. That's all they can dream of using. Then, there's the fill rate of these old oil wells, and (not so assumed) costs of pulling up and placing new straws all over Texas, etc.

    My advice. Get CPS, and your utility bill, as far away from this as possible. Where they claim "clean", ask for tons of CO2 production from the facilities tied to CCS, and then how much actually finds a hole. Expose them with a fly swatter.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by pjwood1 View Post
    Hi Norm,

    I always watched your posts, on GMV, and am actively following this weeks EPA CPP roll-out. (Not coming around here, so much anymore).

    As to carbon capture, I'd try to steer CPS away from "clean coal" as it relates to CO2, as it is highly suspect technology. Certainly, not the stuff municipal utilities should approach. So far, all boondoggles. "Future Gen" and the MS Kemper IGCC plant, both made tall claims. Nothing but bills are panning out for rate-payers attached to any of this stuff.

    Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a joke, in relation to the sheer volumes of CO2 coming from a coal power plant. This is key. A 1,000MW coal plant can spew 24,000 tons of CO2 per day. Contracts with firms, like Denby resources, frequently amount to only 500 tons/day. That's all they can dream of using. Then, there's the fill rate of these old oil wells, and (not so assumed) costs of pulling up and placing new straws all over Texas, etc.

    My advice. Get CPS, and your utility bill, as far away from this as possible. Where they claim "clean", ask for tons of CO2 production from the facilities tied to CCS, and then how much actually finds a hole. Expose them with a fly swatter.
    Thanks for the heads up.

    I've kept a close eye on the rates of CPS for some time. In fact, before installing solar, I reviewed my previous 8 years of monthly bills and charted the rate inflation. It came out to 3.8% annualized over that period. We're at ~10 cents/kWh now after a recent increase.

    So, on one hand I'm a cheerleader of keeping the rates as low as possible while on the other, not caring whether it takes off like a rocket - boosting my ROI at a faster clip.

    I don't know yet what percentage of their focus will lean towards new coal technology but I appreciate your warning. I'm excited about their investments in renewables though - methane capture, solar and wind. Now there pricing structure for wind doesn't make a bit of sense to me. You have to pay a premium for it in order to thump your chest about how "Green" you/your business are/is.

    I had to chuckle a bit also when I read this piece about them abandoning Solar PV rebates in favor of leasing agreements. It's as if they woke up one day and discovered that folks actually wanted to install solar. We early adopters (by SATX standards) are grandfathered into our existing net-metering plans which are quite generous.
    Norm

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    I love visiting Texas, especially Austin. I don't know much about CPS energy, but noticed that they are the only provider in San Antonio. No competition usually means poor quality of service. Here are two yelp reviews from people who use CPS energy;

    CPS Energy is a joke. How can my bill for a 1 bedroom apartment that was built less than 3 years ago be $200???? And when I want answers I'm put on hold for hours, asked for a call back at the end of the day. Or the next day! If you're gonna charge this much I better be getting real customer service. Every time I've called I have had to deal with sassy employees stating "well that will increase your bill" to every sentence I say. This is ridiculous. You're greedy, energy shouldn't be treated like this. For profit. You should be helping the members of the community, not hurting them. I despise you.
    horrible service, rude people on the phone, and their phone system is a joke. This cutie needs an alternative or two for power. I would pay 25% more for a polite helpful person on the other side of the counter and a call center with enough people to keep the hold time under 5 minutes... on hold for an hour and a half just to have the jerk that answered say, "hold on i'm gonna transfer you to the right department" and I get transferred to the main phone system again. Seriously the worst Utility company I have ever dealt with. Didn't have issues like those in Dallas because they compete with other companies to earn and maintain your business relationship. The day CPS has a competitor, will be a great day for this city.
    CPS Energy customers merit better service
    http://www.mysanantonio.com/opinion/...ce-5128761.php

    11 more CPS energy reviews
    http://www.yelp.com/biz/cps-energy-san-antonio-3

    They don't sound like they are getting out ahead of the curve.

  9. #8
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    San Antonio was the only one of the Big 3 Texas areas not to deregulate and we have some of the lowest prices in the state. Look up the DFW deregulation fiasco to see what happened up there. Power providers went bankrupt left and right.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thirsty Dog View Post
    I love visiting Texas, especially Austin. I don't know much about CPS energy, but noticed that they are the only provider in San Antonio. No competition usually means poor quality of service. Here are two yelp reviews from people who use CPS energy;





    CPS Energy customers merit better service
    http://www.mysanantonio.com/opinion/...ce-5128761.php

    11 more CPS energy reviews
    http://www.yelp.com/biz/cps-energy-san-antonio-3

    They don't sound like they are getting out ahead of the curve.
    To start, I have to agree that since they installed an automated telephone answering/redirect system a couple of years back, getting to talk to a live human takes longer now. But all of my interactions have been pleasant. While we were have our solar array installed I both talked to and e-mailed a number of staff there with great interaction.

    I remember that episode back when they had issues with their meter-reading contractor. I was one of those that got a few "estimated" bills. But it clearly stated on the bill that that was the case. When CPS finishes rolling out smart meters to everyone, the plan is to have an aerial meter reading company report the data they've collected

    As for Yelp, that's a generational tool that doesn't merit attention from my generation. I talked to a couple of co-workers that are 10-15 years younger than myself this morning to see if it was just me and my impromptu poll revealed that they had the same opinion. Their words: "Yelp is for people that want to complain about stuff." and "Yelp is for the age group that takes/posts pictures of their food."

    EDIT: My feelings about Yelp: I'm with the doctors on this.

    CPSEnergy is wholly owned by the City of San Antonio and answers to the city government. As to their rates, they're presented to the City Council for approval. The last increase was last year for 4.5% of the 5% that they'd asked for, with a commitment of not coming back to the table for another increase for two years.

    As to my claim about CPS getting out ahead of the curve, I was referring to future EPA regulations.

    Switching back to rates; I don't see where they're that high. Here's a snapshot of my current bill. Tell what you think. Granted, our electric usage is offset by our solar array, but you can see for yourself what the actual rates are. Adding up the numbers, the "All In" rate is about 10 cents/kWh. CPS also provides our NatGas (hot water, furnace and cooking in our home) and does the billing for our garbage service. Note also that only the solid waste fee is taxable.

    Throw in consecutive +100*F days/80* nights like we're seeing right now and leaving the A/C on cold and you, too can run up an electric bill in a small apartment.



    Current CPS Bill.jpg
    Last edited by Norm51; 3 Weeks Ago at 03:59 PM. Reason: Yelp commentary
    Norm

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  12. #10
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    Default Power pollution hits a low

    In related new, the first in these shorts is good new.

    SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS: View "Power pollution hits a low" article at http://tablet.olivesoftware.com/Oliv...F06&id=Ar01601
    Norm

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