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Topic Review (Newest First)

  • 05-22-2017 12:44 PM
    tacman7
    I wish I had those rates. Here in Galivornia it's a little higher.


    Attachment 135377
  • 05-21-2017 01:14 PM
    canehdian
    Quote Originally Posted by ampera_jed View Post
    We don't have 120V here, I guess it has to be able to charge at that level for US use.

    I wonder if a standard UK Volt/Ampera would take 120V?
    Yes, but it wouldn't be easy for you.
    IIRC your power is not like ours in that it is 230V hot and a neutral.
    Ours is 120V in two different lines/phases/directions such that they add together to be 240V.
    Using one hot only and a neutral gives 120V, using two hots gives 240V (no neutral is required as each wire is the return path for the other).

    What you could do is get an EVSE with custom programmable pilot signal.
    Users here have tested that the volt would accept as low as 6A charging communicated by EVSE, so 1.38kW is the minimum you'd get on true 230V power source without using transformers to get 120V.

    Meanwhile on our 120V source the lowest possible would be 0.72 kW with a custom EVSE (6A), or 0.96kW on a standard EVSE (8A).

    The maximum, as mentioned, is limited by the onboard charging unit by either amps or maximum power.
    Even if the voltage spikes, the maximum power will never exceed 3.3kW - it will dial back the amps to meet that level.
    If the voltage sags, it will not up the amps beyond it's maximum, meaning you do not get the full 3.3kW, even if the EVSE is capable of more amps.
  • 05-21-2017 12:47 PM
    NinjaVolt
    @llninja....I agree no carbon free substitute yet for the BBQ
  • 05-21-2017 12:13 PM
    ampera_jed
    Quote Originally Posted by bentbiker View Post
    Similarly, I wonder why someone would go out of their way to insult an individual who just tried to help them understand something that was confusing to them.
    Is that at me?
  • 05-21-2017 12:07 PM
    2VoltFamily
    Quote Originally Posted by ampera_jed View Post
    I wonder if a standard UK Volt/Ampera would take 120V?
    Since the voltage 120/240 is a function of the EVSE and not the on board charger I would say yes. The wattage fluctuates through out the charge cycle regardless of the voltage as it ramps up and as it ramps down. Therefore I know it is possible to take as low as 1 kWh rate (or lower) of charge and as high as 3.3 kWh.


    Quote Originally Posted by ampera_jed View Post
    I've noticed on all my EVs that when our voltage goes over 250V (it's allowed to get up to 253V, 230V + 10%,, and I have seen it even higher) it keeps charging at the same current, it just means it charges at higher power when the volts are higher.
    A Volt will not charge faster than 3.3 kWh. If the EVSE functions at 250V the negotiation between the on-board charger and the EVSE will reduce the amperage accordingly to not exceed 3.3 kWh. At 240V and 13.75A that is 3.3 kW. For 250V it would reduce to 13.2A.

    Conversely if the voltage drops below 240V the Gen 1 would increase to 14A. However 14A is the highest limit, therefore it is possible to not get 3.3 kWh as the voltage drops say if you are using a 208V outlet. Therefore you would have a slight increase in charge time.
  • 05-21-2017 02:39 AM
    bentbiker
    Quote Originally Posted by ampera_jed View Post
    PS - why do people capitalize the wrong letters for power/energy units? It's not because they are not bothering to, they are just capitalizing the wrong ones?
    A
    W
    kWh
    kW
    V
    Similarly, I wonder why someone would go out of their way to insult an individual who just tried to help them understand something that was confusing to them.
  • 05-21-2017 01:25 AM
    ampera_jed
    Quote Originally Posted by bentbiker View Post
    8a x 120v = 960w = 1 KW. And a gen1 won't go above 3.3 KW.
    We don't have 120V here, I guess it has to be able to charge at that level for US use.

    I wonder if a standard UK Volt/Ampera would take 120V?

    I've noticed on all my EVs that when our voltage goes over 250V (it's allowed to get up to 253V, 230V + 10%,, and I have seen it even higher) it keeps charging at the same current, it just means it charges at higher power when the volts are higher.

    PS - why do people capitalize the wrong letters for power/energy units? It's not because they are not bothering to, they are just capitalizing the wrong ones?
    A
    W
    kWh
    kW
    V
  • 05-20-2017 01:09 PM
    bentbiker
    Quote Originally Posted by ampera_jed View Post
    I would have suggested 2 to 3.5.

    Will it really charge at 1?!
    8a x 120v = 960w = 1 KW. And a gen1 won't go above 3.3 KW.
  • 05-20-2017 12:41 PM
    llninja
    Quote Originally Posted by NinjaVolt View Post
    BC is similar to what alfon stated for Oregon. If you use more than a set residential amount you get charged a higher rate.

    I can understand this for water conservation for which there is no other substitute, but for "clean" hydro electrical power (in BC) I see it as a penalty for those who invested in non-fossil fuel residential alternatives like heat pumps and electric vehicles.

    It's a good thing I'm just a pessimist and not a conspiracy theorist....��
    From one ninja to another, if it is indeed a higher rate at times, that might clobber me as I have a geothermal system and nothing that burns fossil fuels (except for the grill and lawn mowers).
  • 05-20-2017 11:37 AM
    NinjaVolt
    BC is similar to what alfon stated for Oregon. If you use more than a set residential amount you get charged a higher rate.

    I can understand this for water conservation for which there is no other substitute, but for "clean" hydro electrical power (in BC) I see it as a penalty for those who invested in non-fossil fuel residential alternatives like heat pumps and electric vehicles.

    It's a good thing I'm just a pessimist and not a conspiracy theorist....��
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