: Extension Cords



VoltInSD
12-13-2010, 11:58 AM
Since some of us would like to be able to charge away from home, and since distance from parking spot to a 110V outlet may be longer than that of the Volt's charge cord, does anyone know if there would be an issue extending the range of the Volt's charge cord with a standard 50' or 100' outdoor electrical extension cord? Thanks!

WopOnTour
12-13-2010, 12:36 PM
Not recommended, but you'll do what you gotta do!
You'll lose some efficiency (takes more energy) and and possibly create some safety concerns -but it WILL charge.
Make sure it's outdoor rated and as large wire gage as you can afford (or carry).
WOT

VoltInSD
12-13-2010, 12:37 PM
Nevermind, I found the answer thanks to the online owner's manual, which says:

"An extension cord should not be used to charge the vehicle. Use of an extension cord may increase the risk of electric shock or other hazards. If an extension cord is used because of limited access to 120V AC power, use the following safeguards:
- The 120V AC outlet should be GFCI protected
- The extension cord should be GFCI protected, 12 or 14 guage, 3 conductor, rated for outdoor"

Anyone know what a GFCI protected extension cord looks like? Thanks.

WopOnTour
12-13-2010, 12:48 PM
Nevermind, I found the answer thanks to the online owner's manual, which says:

"An extension cord should not be used to charge the vehicle. Use of an extension cord may increase the risk of electric shock or other hazards. If an extension cord is used because of limited access to 120V AC power, use the following safeguards:
- The 120V AC outlet should be GFCI protected
- The extension cord should be GFCI protected, 12 or 14 guage, 3 conductor, rated for outdoor"

Anyone know what a GFCI protected extension cord looks like? Thanks.That just means it should alsways be a 3-prong extension cord and plugged into a GFCI protected houehold outlet.
WOT

Marty
12-13-2010, 12:50 PM
Like WOT says, not recommended. I'd use a 12-gauge extension cord. Hazards to be aware of are the obvious possibility of water getting into the connection between the cord and the EVSE, tripping hazards, etc.

It will work.
A 50-foot, 12-gauge cord will drop about 3.9 volts at 12 amps.
A 100-foot 12-gauge cord will drop about 7.8 volts at 12 amps.

A 50-foot, 14-gauge cord will drop about 6.2 volts at 12 amps.
A 100-foot 14-gauge cord will drop about 12.4 volts at 12 amps.

Assuming worst case with a 14-gauge, 100-foot cord you're throwing away 10% of the power in the cord. The vehicle will be getting around 105 volts instead of 117. This may be approaching the point where the vehicle or EVSE detects an undervoltage fault and stops charging. If the wire run within the building to the outlet is long, the voltage drop will be worse.

Xzlon
12-13-2010, 12:51 PM
The GFCI is in the receptacle you are plugging in to. By code all outdoor receptacles are GFCI. You may find one in a person's garage.(or bathroom, or kitchen) The extension cord needs to be a three wire with a three prong plug. Preferably 12 guage. Use the 120 volt low setting if 14 guage. I have a couple of 100ft cords left over from building my house. I will probably make a 50ft cord to carry in my Volt.

hamchief
12-13-2010, 02:08 PM
Assuming you don't have a nearby GFCI outlet:
http://www.nextag.com/gfci-extension-cord/compare-html

LeoK
12-21-2010, 07:02 PM
FYI.... the standard 120V charge cord and the Volt are smart... if you plug into a 120V outlet that is not properly grounded, the car will start chirpping and will not charge - lights on the charger will flash red. Same thing if you use the wrong extension cord. I actually have not found an extension cord that works - tried a couple just to see, but nothing yet. I'll try a commercial grade extension cord and see if that works - as some customers will not be able to park close enough to a 120V outlet.

One suggestion for GM - here's another good LPO to offer: 100' 120V charge cord - for those customers who need extra reach for normal charging. It would be far better for GM to design and provide such a cord than have customers trying to use a combination of standard charge cord plus extension cord.

Rusty
12-21-2010, 07:06 PM
Same thing if you use the wrong extension cord. I actually have not found an extension cord that works

Really? I was planning on getting a 50' 12/3 cord for motel/work/non-secured charging. I don't see what's there that might cause it to *not* work, so your comment is.. hmmm... Guess we'll have to try it.

kmoore
12-21-2010, 07:33 PM
I can't believe the car would know the difference between an outlet and the plug of a 12-gauge 50 foot extension cord, unless the voltage drop was all it was complaining about. In that case, people will end up having problems with outlets far from the breaker box that are 14 gauge circuits. That would basically be the same problem as someone else mentioned.

Marty
12-21-2010, 08:04 PM
FYI.... the standard 120V charge cord and the Volt are smart... if you plug into a 120V outlet that is not properly grounded, the car will start chirpping and will not charge - lights on the charger will flash red. Same thing if you use the wrong extension cord. I actually have not found an extension cord that works - tried a couple just to see, but nothing yet. I'll try a commercial grade extension cord and see if that works - as some customers will not be able to park close enough to a 120V outlet.


Are you using a three-wire extension cord, one with two flat prongs and one round one?

What wire gauge and length?

Does it work in the low (8-ampere) setting?

LGA
12-21-2010, 08:31 PM
You might have a miswired wall outlet, too -- bad ground or reversed hot/neutral. Try one of those cheap plug-in testers to confirm proper wiring.

ocryan
12-27-2010, 08:09 AM
I actually have not found an extension cord that works - tried a couple just to see, but nothing yet. I'll try a commercial grade extension cord and see if that works - as some customers will not be able to park close enough to a 120V outlet.

I just have a regular orange extension cord, 25ft, nothing special. Couldn't tell you if its 12 or 14 gauge, but it works just fine plugged into my garage outlet with the EVSE on the normal "high" setting.

WVhybrid
01-02-2011, 02:01 PM
FWIW, there are some places that sell 10 gauge extension cords. Ten gauge wire has about 38% less resistance than 12 AWG wire. They don't come cheap, however, at about $1/foot. Good luck, and happy "VOLTING". :)

woodruff13
01-02-2011, 02:35 PM
The other point is to have the unit in the charging cord drop to the 8 amp mode from the 12 amp mode.

In my garage, the GFI is old and tired. It trips on the 12a mode, so I push the orange button before plugging it in, and it charged overnight on the 8a mode.

So, any time you think you've got a limitation on the supply, drop to the 8a mode. This should make it works w/ extension cords.

ChrisC
01-02-2011, 04:14 PM
I have been charging exclusively in 7-8 Amp mode so far. I haven't yet needed to charge faster, and wanted to avoid dealing with popped breakers and the like at the various places I was charging for the first week until I got the car home. And even now at home I have yet to charge it at the faster rate.

I'm definitely looking forward to getting my kill-a-watt in there and seeing what it tells me ...

evil_attorney
01-07-2011, 04:38 PM
Just want to bump this thread. Has anyone else had any experiences with extension cords working/not working? I expect to get my Volt in the next few weeks and will likely need to use an extension cord until I can figure out my charger situation.

ocryan
01-07-2011, 04:49 PM
Just want to bump this thread. Has anyone else had any experiences with extension cords working/not working? I expect to get my Volt in the next few weeks and will likely need to use an extension cord until I can figure out my charger situation.

Prior to installing my Voltec EVSE, I used an extension cord for 10 days with NO issue. I did not need to step down to the lower power level. I simply plugged the extension cord into the wall and then plugged the EVSE into the extension cord. My outlet that I plugged into was already a GFCI outlet and is connected to a 20 amp circuit in my panel. I used an extension cord that I just had laying around, it is a three prong orange exterior grade extension cord 25 feet in length.

barry252
01-08-2011, 02:08 PM
I bought a 100' 12ga. Yellow extension cord (industrial grade) from Lowes. It works great. I've recharged from several different outlets at home and an exterior outlet at work with no issues. I've monitored temperatures of the line and the only components that get warm is the Voltec charger itself and its short 14ga. plug wire.

While charging, using a Kill-a-watt meter, I measured 114.8V at the wall outlet, 111.0V at the end of the extension cord, while drawing 11.75amps. I've tested the 8amp Voltec setting, but have not had to use it yet. I've had the meter for only a few days and have only had to top off battery levels. I'll get measurements next week.

bitguru
01-12-2011, 01:03 AM
I just have a regular orange extension cord, 25ft, nothing special. Couldn't tell you if its 12 or 14 gauge

If it's nothing special, then it's probably neither. 16 gauge is more common.



the only components that get warm is the Voltec charger itself and its short 14ga.

Someone on another forum said the 110V charger was 16 gauge. Was he mistaken?

bjhorton2005
01-12-2011, 01:31 AM
Go with the larger wire. Regardless of the size of the wire on the charger cord, the electrons flowing through it aren't flowing as far. :) Lower the heat and resistance where you can. I hope that they did go with a larger wire though.

Rusty
01-12-2011, 02:48 AM
If you're going with an extension cord, go 12 gauge. Lower voltage drop yields better charging rates. That said, I ran into an extension cord issue today. I've been charging on the road as suggested in the "how to charge at a hotel" thread. I replaced the plug end of my extension cord with a GFCI plug, for safety. Tonight's hotel?

Plug's in a box with walls, and the GFCI doesn't fit. So for tonight I've got the EVSE plugged directly into the plug, with the cord looped through the driver's window (as described before) and through the steering wheel (fortunately I'm parked close, in the hotel's front drive port). While it doesn't prevent vandalism (unlikely) it should reduce the threat of theft.

Since the plug I'm plugged in to here in Lubbock is a GFCI socket, I'll go out and buy a short suitable gauge extension cord tomorrow.

fltcmndr
01-22-2011, 09:55 PM
I just bought my Volt and had no outlets near enough to charge using the 115VAC charger supplied by Chevy. Just bought a 100' RIGID 10 gauge extension cord from Home Depot and plugged it into my 115VAC outlet at work...charged the vehicle just fine, with no difference that I could ascertain in charge time

evil_attorney
01-27-2011, 12:57 PM
I am now using a 50 ft 12" extension cord at work and there is no problem charging or with charge time.

Hollywoods
01-30-2011, 12:22 AM
Has anyone used an aftermarket extension cord with success? If so, can you list the make and model used.

marlow
01-30-2011, 01:57 AM
The #12 wire cords would be a very safe choice even at the higher 120 volt charg setting.

The smaller the wire gauge the larger the wire.

In home wiring a 12 gauge wire is rated at 20 amps, and thats inclosed in a wall.

the 14 gauge wire is safe for 15 amps.

16 gauge - 10 amps

The comment about length is very true, and loss of voltage is energy loss and especialy whae used with newer devices and I am assuming that the Volt has a switching power supply like most newer devices.

These switching poweersupplies are very efficennt, smaller, lighter in weight and now days much cheeper than the older tyes, they do have a down side, that is they olny draw power off the tops and bottoms of the AC power sine wave. So while you may measure a average power of say 10 amps the actual peek power draw may be 20 and while the heating load on the wire and connectors will average out the losses may not.

So sense I assume that most volt oners are interested in long term savings go with the larger (smaller gauge cords. The 10 gauge imay be a bit of over kill and much more costly to purchase.

Hollywoods
01-30-2011, 11:56 AM
I am now using a 50 ft 12" extension cord at work and there is no problem charging or with charge time.

When you run the cord at work what do you do to hide it? I'm going to charge my volt (when it comes in) at work too but I'm worried about someone tripping over the cord and getting hurt. Maybe I can get something to put over the cord so that nobody will get hurt.

ocryan
01-31-2011, 12:55 PM
This one has been working absolutely fine for me for a month or so. Level 1 evse is always at its "max" setting without issue. Pick it up at Home Depot. It fits nicely under neath the rear cargo area to the right in the open space.

14ga up to 50 feet is fine @ 15 amps, the level 1 charger draws 13 amps.

951

DanFowler
01-31-2011, 12:59 PM
My work had extra orange safety cones that they placed outside by the socket for me. When I plug in to charge, I set out a couple of the orange cones by the cord.


When you run the cord at work what do you do to hide it? I'm going to charge my volt (when it comes in) at work too but I'm worried about someone tripping over the cord and getting hurt. Maybe I can get something to put over the cord so that nobody will get hurt.

evil_attorney
01-31-2011, 01:07 PM
When you run the cord at work what do you do to hide it? I'm going to charge my volt (when it comes in) at work too but I'm worried about someone tripping over the cord and getting hurt. Maybe I can get something to put over the cord so that nobody will get hurt.

I am parking in the back of the building near an unused back door. The outlet is inside the building and the cord fits in the gap under the door without an issue. There is no real sidewalk back there, so there is no safety issues.

If you are worried about people tripping, you could get an indoor/outdoor rug to put over the cord. Or one of these "ramps": http://www.electriduct.com/Heavy-Duty_c_67.html

Hollywoods
01-31-2011, 08:46 PM
Thanks guys! I'm going to buy the 50 ft cord to charge my vehicle at work. The cones idea is a good one.

mja840
02-09-2011, 10:32 PM
At home I have been using a 50 ft extension cord, but I've needed to use the Reduced Level setting to avoid getting faults and tripping the circuit breaker. This has been okay, but I have decided to order the Voltec unit from SPX (hopefully, with the DOE grant paying for it). At work, I am fortunate to be able to plug into an outlet in the garage and charge at the Normal 12-amp level.

evil_attorney
02-16-2011, 04:08 PM
We are getting some rain this week in SoCal, so I thought I would share my quick fix for dealing with the rain when using an extension cord at work. It's probably not the best option, but it seems to have worked so far.

At work, I plug into an outlet just inside our back door with an extension cord. As seen in my first pic below, I use a GFCI device at the outlet. Obviously, this is a must have for safety reasons.

http://i55.tinypic.com/a5fc6s.jpg

Next, the end of the extension cord and the charger are placed in this inexpensive Rubbermaid container.

http://i55.tinypic.com/2exygb4.jpg

I cut notches into each side of the container so that the lid would close properly. The container has a lip that protects water from dripping directly down the side. I wrapped the extension cord and charger plug with some plastic I had lying around for a little extra insurance, but have ordered one of these outdoor covers: http://www.amazon.com/Farm-Innovators-Cord-Connect-Water-Tight/dp/B002MHFXS8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1297890194&sr=8-1

http://i52.tinypic.com/8xndkw.jpg

We have had moderate rain so far and the charger and the end of the extension cord have remained perfectly dry. I'm sure there are better/safer ways of doing this too. Anyone else put something like this together yet or have some better suggestions?

Rusty
02-16-2011, 04:21 PM
At work, I plug into an outlet just inside our back door with an extension cord. As seen in my first pic below, I use a GFCI device at the outlet. Obviously, this is a must have for safety reasons.

It should be noted that the GFCI plug shown in your picture is *NOT* rated for indoor/outdoor use. Your use here is fine, since it's indoor. But while conveniently available at Home Depot, it's not weather proof. As noted elsewhere I'm using a Leviton 16592 GFCI, replacing the plug on a 50' 12/3 cord. It *is* weather rated (important, since I use an outside plug at home).

1114


I believe the EVSE controller is also rated for indoor/outdoor all-weather use. The tub is a really nice idea, and a cool way to keep it neat! But I don't think it's completely necessary. I just left my EVSE on top of a few coils of cord last night (so as to be off the ground and out of any standing water!) for our SD rain.

hamchief
02-16-2011, 04:27 PM
Nifty idea!
It'll hold the EVSE, extension cord, and the GFCI adaptor.

Now, I just gotta get the nerve to ask my CEO if I can charge at work!

evil_attorney
02-16-2011, 04:35 PM
Yea, it really helps with the mess that a wet charger/cord may make in the nice, new Volt!

DarkStar
02-16-2011, 04:52 PM
Nifty idea!
It'll hold the EVSE, extension cord, and the GFCI adaptor.

Now, I just gotta get the nerve to ask my CEO if I can charge at work!

When you do get the nerve, I would approach them by asking what would be necessary to allow them to let you charge at work. ;-)

Hollywoods
02-20-2011, 02:37 AM
Great idea you had here!

voltcrazy
03-19-2011, 04:05 PM
@evil_attorney, what size Rubbermaid container did you buy? My Volt it supposed to be delivered tomorrow and I want to go buy a container now.....great idea btw!

Anyone have the dimensions of the standard 120V EVSE?

evil_attorney
03-19-2011, 04:11 PM
My container is at work, so I can't tell you now. I picked it up at home depot. It was the smaller size of that style, I think.

ctdeng0
03-19-2011, 04:27 PM
120V EVSE is 17" x 6" x 3".

Rusty
03-19-2011, 04:39 PM
@evil_attorney, what size Rubbermaid container did you buy?

I picked up a boot box (http://www.containerstore.com/shop/storage/storageBoxes/plastic?productId=10009590&N=71227) from the Container Store (http://www.containerstore.com/). Dimensions are 22 1/2" x 14 3/4" x 5 3/8". List price on the web is $8.99, so it's inexpensive.

Advantage? It fits under the car!

voltcrazy
03-20-2011, 10:35 PM
@evil_attorney, @cteng0, @Rusty - thank you guys! I went to Target today and bought a container almost the exact same size as Rusty's "boot box!"

Rusty
03-27-2011, 04:49 PM
I picked up a boot box (http://www.containerstore.com/shop/storage/storageBoxes/plastic?productId=10009590&N=71227) from the Container Store (http://www.containerstore.com/). Dimensions are 22 1/2" x 14 3/4" x 5 3/8". List price on the web is $8.99, so it's inexpensive.

1501

And here it is. Note the padlock. Why isn't it under the car? 'Cause I leave the cable looped around something that isnt' going to move in the garage, and the box is mostly under the eaves. Doesn't mean it doesn't get wet when it rains (it does), but no water's gotten inside even with fairly heavy rain.

HOUSTONVOLTAGE
05-12-2011, 07:29 PM
I bought a 12 gauge 25ft RIGID extension cord at Home Depot, but after 2 weeks I noticed the prongs were burnt. Not wanting a fire, I bought some 10 gauge 3 conductor wire plus male/female ends and made a cord. It's worked ok for two days now. Will report if there are any problems. I don't understand why the RIGID cord burned when others on this thread say they have no problems with theirs. Maybe I got a bad one.

ocryan
05-12-2011, 07:39 PM
I bought a 12 gauge 25ft RIGID extension cord at Home Depot, but after 2 weeks I noticed the prongs were burnt. Not wanting a fire, I bought some 10 gauge 3 conductor wire plus male/female ends and made a cord. It's worked ok for two days now. Will report if there are any problems. I don't understand why the RIGID cord burned when others on this thread say they have no problems with theirs. Maybe I got a bad one.

Level 1 charging is limited by the standard to 12 amps. The 12ga/25 ft RIGID extension cord is rated to 15 amps. You either got a bad cord or something else is going on there.

TSquare
05-12-2011, 07:46 PM
I bought a 12 gauge 25ft RIGID extension cord at Home Depot, but after 2 weeks I noticed the prongs were burnt. Not wanting a fire, I bought some 10 gauge 3 conductor wire plus male/female ends and made a cord. It's worked ok for two days now. Will report if there are any problems. I don't understand why the RIGID cord burned when others on this thread say they have no problems with theirs. Maybe I got a bad one.

If the prongs are burnt they may be arcing in the receptacle indicating a loose fit when plugged in. You may need to replace the receptacle in the wall.

morbius14
03-29-2013, 11:01 PM
Hi guys! Just got my Volt today, very excited but for those time when you just can't park close enough to the outlet I want to get an extension cord. After reading through the posts sounds like to be on the safe side, I need a GFCI outlet with a minimum 12 gauge cord. I found this one on Amazon for a reasonable price, do you guys think this will be safe to use? I don't want to burn down my house.... Any help would be appreciated!

http://www.amazon.com/2883-Heavy-Duty-Contractor-Extension-Lighted/dp/B000KKLMO8/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_nC?ie=UTF8&colid=1UPJR8B1LA9WE&coliid=I11OHXBB2O6NVL

donrim
03-30-2013, 12:48 AM
That extension cord will do fine.

As others have mentioned, you will want to check the condition of the outlet you will be plugging into. If it is old, loose, and worn, the outlet's contacts might not apply enough pressure against the blades of the plug to maintain a good, low resistance electrical connection. This can lead to the plug heating up excessively. Check the plug in the wall outlet after a few hours of charging for any abnormal heat.

It is a good idea to buy a heavy duty receptacle at the hardware store for a few dollars and replace the current one making sure the copper supply wires are tightened down under the receptacle screw terminals and not pushed into the quick connect holes. A heavy duty outlet will have high contact pressure and will require higher force to plug in.

If your plug plugs in too easily into the outlet or even feels loose in the outlet, the outlet should be replaced.

FlyingVolt
06-08-2013, 07:07 PM
Just got my brand-new 2013 volt. I spoke to a volt advisor about extension cords because I couldn't remember what gauge was recommended and couldn't find it in the manual. She started to explain the same recommendations that have been discussed here, then stopped herself, asked if it was a 2013 MY, and said no charging with extension cords was advisable with a 2013. Anyone else heard that or know why?

Loving it so far...

Steverino
06-08-2013, 07:44 PM
I spoke to a volt advisor about extension cords because I couldn't remember what gauge was recommended and couldn't find it in the manual.

What does page 9-54 of your 2013 owners manual say about extension cords?

Cord
06-08-2013, 11:31 PM
I would almost try to make the case that a 3 foot good gauge cable is not an extension cord but an adapter.

I want the ware on an item easy to replace and not my weather proof out door socket.

FlyingVolt
06-10-2013, 07:06 PM
What does page 9-54 of your 2013 owners manual say about extension cords?

From page 9-54:
"WARNING: Extension cords, multi-outlet power strips, surge protectors, or similar devices could increase the risk of electrical shock or other hazards. Do not use these types of devices with the charge cord."

Anyone know if the 2013 is different and if so, why? The Volt Advisor said something about people electrocuting themselves, so they changed the recommendation...

tewcpa
06-11-2013, 07:55 PM
I've been using my regular orange 50 foot extension cord with no issues, so far.

Steverino
06-11-2013, 08:38 PM
From page 9-54:
"WARNING: Extension cords, multi-outlet power strips, surge protectors, or similar devices could increase the risk of electrical shock or other hazards. Do not use these types of devices with the charge cord."

Anyone know if the 2013 is different and if so, why? The Volt Advisor said something about people electrocuting themselves, so they changed the recommendation...

More likely they said they didn't want someone to run into trouble. If someone had zapped themselves, it would be headline news. Given how many people can't figure out how to buy and use an appropriate extension cord, I suspect they have dropped all references to them.

mikeg3
06-11-2013, 09:45 PM
I have a heavy gauge four foot extension cord with a built-in GFCI. That gets around non-GFCI outlets, especially outlets in an outdoor-rated box that can't take a flush-mounted GFCI.

I never had trouble extending my L1 charger with a 50 foot cord, but the house is new and the circuit is not otherwise loaded. If I were going to try this in an older house, I'd put in a new up-rated outlet and be careful about other loads on the branch circuit.

I would never do anything outdoors without a GFCI, even a bug zapper.

mikeg3
06-11-2013, 09:51 PM
More likely they said they didn't want someone to run into trouble. If someone had zapped themselves, it would be headline news. Given how many people can't figure out how to buy and use an appropriate extension cord, I suspect they have dropped all references to them.

Lawyers at work. Instead of protecting the customer by telling us the safest way to use an extension cord, they protect themselves by just saying no.

Steverino
06-12-2013, 01:08 AM
Lawyers at work. Instead of protecting the customer by telling us the safest way to use an extension cord, they protect themselves by just saying no.

You are probably right, mikeg3. It would not surprise me if that were the case.

FlyingVolt
06-13-2013, 11:14 AM
Yeah, all that is pretty much what I figured. Thanks for the replies.

Boris
06-13-2013, 03:46 PM
I have been using a 13 gauge 12 inch long pigtail to plug power cord into wall receptacle due to the configuration of the actual plug at end of the Volt's power cord. After 10-months of flawless performance my car had a no start problem and then once it decided to start it would not move (see my post "Volt Died). A total of 13 codes were thrown in a 24-hour period after car had to be towed to dealer for service. Service technician says all issues related to using the pigtail and strongly advised to not use anything other than the original plug to connect power cord to outlet. While difficult to believe that such havoc can be caused by using a 12-inch proper gauged pigtail, I have to say I am real gun shy now of using anything between the power cord and the wall socket.

msirach
06-13-2013, 04:47 PM
Extension cords add resistance to the circuit feeding the charger. Most consumer cords are 16ga. unless you specifically purchased a 10ga. or 12ga. cord. Each plug increases resistance so the extension cord length and the extra 2 connection plugs add resistance. If you have an outlet putting out 120v, I have seen the voltage at the end of an extension cord be as low as 95 volts. Resistance is heat which can lead to fires.

IceTrojan
08-26-2013, 01:50 AM
How do we feel about these two replacement plugs by Leviton for our heavy-duty extension cords?

Male - Angled: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00004YUKX/

Female - Straight: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00002NASF/

alfon
08-26-2013, 02:11 AM
I believe with a 8 amp setting an extension cord should not be a problem.