Archive for the ‘General’ Category

 

Sep 07

Chevrolet Teases 2017 Bolt EV ‘Regen on Demand’ Paddle

 

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Are you ready for the 2017 Chevy Bolt EV? Chevrolet is getting ready for you, assuming you are, and meanwhile it is drumming up excitement for the first EV to have 200 miles range for $30,000 after subsidies.

While EV watchers are eagerly awaiting its EPA certifications, dealer ordering to open for the $37,500-before-subsidy EV, and more definitive details, the automaker today is teasing out previously announced info about one-pedal driving with the Bolt.

A novel feature, the 2017 Bolt EV permits this via a regenerative braking paddle on the back of the steering wheel to enable four different operating modes.

The “regen on demand paddle” lets the driver slow the car at varying rates – and simultaneously the motor-generator feeds current back to the battery, increasing range.

“Using a vehicle simulation model, engineers compared regen performance on a testing cycle that simulated heavy stop-and-go traffic in Drive and another using one-pedal driving while in Low and also the Regen on Demand paddle,” said Chevrolet. “The engineers found that the one-pedal driving can add up to 5 percent of range to the Bolt EV.”

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Regenerative braking in itself is not new, and has been used in hybrids for years, but the Bolt takes it to a new level above even GM’s latest plug-in cars.

The regen paddle has evolved since it was first featured on the now-discontinued Cadillac ELR, then second-generation 2016 Chevy Volt, and the Bolt does them one better by even enabling a complete stop.

The effect is not unlike how hand brake controls would work for a handicap-enabled vehicle, and it can be easily adjusted on the fly to be progressively stronger in the following modes:

• Operating in Drive and easing off the accelerator.
• Operating in Drive and using the Regen on Demand paddle on the back of the steering wheel.
• Operating in Low and easing off the accelerator.
• Operating in Low and using the Regen on Demand paddle in tandem.

The first mode is standard with any EV, as all provide a bit of regenerative braking on decel, and coasting is still easy. The second through fourth add regen effect, and using another corollary, it is something like shifting an automatic transmission in Low – and feeling the drag in forward momentum – and then if there were an extra-low, the drag effect is felt more and more.

“Bolt EV customers who want an engaging driving experience will love the thrill of one-pedal driving,” said Bolt EV Chief Engineer Josh Tavel. “They will be able to tailor the vehicle to their preferred driving style and maximize their range.”

Reports have been that the Bolt will come to a complete stop even on a decline meaning the regen paddle can be used like a brake.

In actual use, the system will likely be easy to adapt to, and become an extra means to control the car. Drivers will be able to time stops to a light or slow the car without having to touch the brake pedal in many circumstances.

It is not actually a replacement for the brake pedal though, and when faster stops are needed, that will be the one to use.

Meanwhile, Chevrolet has also recently reiterated what it says on its consumer website that the Bolt EV will be here this year, and thus is not delayed.

Further details like all-important range have yet to be disclosed. The automaker, which has consistently said range will be more than 200 miles range in its latest statement says it will be at least 200, if not more.

“During interviews with Chevrolet, EV enthusiasts expressed their desire for one-pedal driving capability,” said the automaker. “Bolt EV owners, much like Chevrolet’s enthusiastic Volt customers, will enjoy using regen braking to maximize every charge of the vehicle’s 60 kWh battery pack. The Bolt EV is GM-estimated to provide 200 miles or more of range.”

HybridCars.com

 

Sep 06

California Agrees on $133 Million for Clean Vehicle Rebate Program

 

By Jon LeSage

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The California legislature allocated $133 million to the Clean Vehicle Rebate Program as the state’s annual budget went down to wire on the August 31 deadline.

The clean vehicle rebate provision was part of a $900 million deal that legislative leaders and Gov. Jerry Brown announced Wednesday. Legislators and the governor’s office had been sparring over how the state’s cap-and-trade revenue, coming from its climate change law, would be spent in the next fiscal year.

The income level cap for clean vehicle rebates was changed as part of the legislature’s commitment to assist disadvantaged communities. It was also driven by complaints that rebates were being given to wealthy Californians to buy high-end models like the Tesla Model S. The new cap for the vehicle rebate program is $300,000 on joint filers and $150,000 on single filers, and it will become effective on Nov. 1, 2016, according to the state’s Department of Finance. The previous cap had been at $500,000 for joint filers and $250,000 for single filers.

“California’s combatting climate change on all fronts and this plan gets us the most bang for the buck,” Gov. Jerry Brown said in a statement. “It directs hundreds of millions where it’s needed most – to help disadvantaged communities, curb dangerous super pollutants and cut petroleum use – while saving some for the future.”

Along with the $130 million for the clean vehicle rebate program, $150 million will be available in rebates for heavy-duty vehicles and off-road equipment investments, according to The Sacramento Bee.

SEE ALSO: California Raises Green Car Rebates For Low-Income Buyers, Cuts Off Top Earners

The clean vehicle rebate program had run out of funding earlier this year, with thousands of consumers put on waiting lists for plug-in electrified vehicle (PEV) rebates. Details on the clean vehicle rebate will be released later. The San Francisco Chronicle reported that there will be a $5,000 rebate for a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle and $900 for a zero-emission motorcycle. Under the current clean vehicle rebate project, administered by the California Air Resource Board, all-electric vehicles are eligible for $2,500 rebates and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles qualify for $1,500 rebates.

The Chronicle also reported that the deal includes $80 million in rebates for vehicle owners to turn in high-emission vehicles that can’t pass a smog check. Rebates will be available to them for their next vehicle purchase ranging from $5,500 to $9,500, depending on the consumer’s income.  Higher-level rebates will be offered as an incentive to turn in a high-emission vehicle and then go out and buy a low-emission replacement vehicle.

Revenue from quarterly cap-and-trade auctions have been a growing source of state tax revenue, and a source of political infighting between legislators, the governor’s office, the oil industry, electric utilities, environmentalists, and automakers. It comes from the 2006 climate change law that was extended from 2020 to 2030 last week in the state legislature, with a higher carbon reduction level starting after 2020.

Most of the cap-and-trade revenue, about 60 percent, is already promised to high-speed rail, affordable housing, public transit, and other programs, according to the Chronicle. The remaining 40 percent is what lawmakers and the governor’s office have been sparring over in the past few months.

San Francisco Chronicle, HybridCars.com.

 

Sep 05

August Chevrolet Volt And Spark EV Sales Were Steady as She Goes

 

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Chevrolet Volt sales at 2,081 sold were on pace last month with previous months this year, and the same is true of the Spark EV with 292 sold.

Compared to August of last year, the Volt was up by 50.8 percent, but August 2016’s number was not enough to match 2,406 sales in July 2016, which itself was its highest sales since August 2014.

In essence the Volt is tracking relatively consistently in the 2,000 plus-or-minus region since its full redesign last year and nationwide introduction this year.

Through August the tally is now 14,295 units, and the Volt is the second best-selling plug-in electrified vehicle in the U.S. behind Tesla’s Model S which is estimated to have over 16,000 sales by now.

According to Michigan-based analyst Alan Baum, Chevrolet did not have any special incentives pushing the Volt beyond $1,000 back and low-interest financing, and supply of the cars was not likely constrained Chevrolet produced 3,911 Volts in June, its highest since 2012.

Spark EV.

Spark EV.

As for the 292 Spark EV sales in August, this was down from July’s 333 sales. The outgoing converted electric car has documented 2,404 sales this year as the pending 2017 Bolt EV looms with first sales promised this year.

This year with eight of 12 months over, the Volt will need a marked rise to outdo its best years on record of 2012 and 2013. Its present total 14,295 units slightly trails August 2013’s 14,994, and is ahead of August 2012’s 13,497.

 

Sep 02

Americans Buy Their Half-Millionth Plug-in Car

 
The Volt leads the pack in cumulative U.S. sales, and today is the second-best-selling PEV in the U.S. after the Model S. Its 53-miles EPA-rated range make it arguably the most effective transitional vehicle bridging the gap between gas and electric, enabling EV use day to day, and hybrid operation on long drives.

The Volt leads the pack in cumulative U.S. sales, and today is the second-best-selling PEV in the U.S. after the Model S. Its 53-miles EPA-rated range make it arguably the most effective transitional vehicle bridging the gap between gas and electric, enabling EV use day to day, and hybrid operation on long drives.

Last month the 500,000th plug-in electrified vehicle was sold in the United States.

Counting all plug-in hybrid and battery electric passenger vehicles back to 2008, the tally of leased and purchased PEVs now make the U.S. the second major market after Europe to have crossed this milestone.

Europe, which last year surpassed U.S. PEV sales, recorded its 500,000th unit in May this year; China is on track to do it soon also with 462,000 in hand and a higher sales monthly rate now than anyone, and the world total is approaching 1.7 million.

In the U.S., believe it or not, there have been more than 30 plug-in electrified models sold, some of which are household names, and others came and went which many people have never heard of. That’s quite a few considering today there are just 38 regular hybrids for sale in the U.S. and they’ve had since 2000 to develop, though today the market share for hybrids is 1.95 percent, and for PEVs it’s 0.81 percent.

Since 2010, cumulative sales have been 499,199 units. Since 2008, including low-volume models not regularly reported, the total is 506,450 – comprised of 52.8 percent battery electrics, and 47.2 percent PHEVs. Charts by Mario R. Duran. Recent Tesla sales are estimated.

Since 2010, cumulative sales have been 499,199 units. Since 2008, including low-volume models not regularly reported, the total is 506,450 – comprised of 52.8 percent battery electrics, and 47.2 percent PHEVs. Charts by Mario R. Duran. Recent Tesla sales are estimated.


The lion’s share of the half-million U.S. PEV sales come from the top models – the Chevy Volt and Nissan Leaf, released in December 2010, and Tesla’s Model S, launched June 2012. Together these models account for 281,000.

Today the Hybridcars.com sales Dashboard keeps tabs on 28 PEVs – and counting – as automakers have been adding more models to the total of a confrontational and controversial market that is just warming up.

Key drivers to its creation and existence are well-documented regulations, particularly from California, to a lesser extend the U.S. EPA, and global markets also have tightening regulations for automakers who look at the entire world as their selling field.

Top selling PEV manufacturers US Aug 2016

Since the powers that be thought last decade to coax automakers toward electrified vehicles in the interests of energy independence and cleaner air, there have however been many bumps in the road.

Followers of sound-bite journalism will be quick to note President Obama’s famous 1-milliion PEVs on U.S. roads by 2015 goal came and went unmet. It may be achieved by 2018, but growth has taken place in spite of unforeseen events.

Annual US sales PEVs Aug 2016
Overall, there’s been pushback from consumers, automakers, auto dealers, and the press on too many factors to fully document. Some of these include concerns over costs, questions about carbon footprint, and not helping things has been the need for “education,” or lack of clear understanding of PEVs’ features, advantages, and benefits.

Cheap gas has seen Americans purchasing many more trucks and SUVs, with sales of these up 10.3 percent through June, while passenger car sales are down by 7.4 percent this year. Automakers have meanwhile not introduced plug-in truck and SUV variants at mainstream or even close to mainstream prices, so the current state of affairs is what it is.

Factors

The weight of California as the leading market cannot be underestimated. It’s by itself responsible for around half the sales credited to the entire country due to its zero emissions laws, and arcane credit system inducing automakers to create cars just for it.

California is also the country’s biggest passenger car market period, and last year bought more than 2 million of the U.S.’ record 17.4 million passenger vehicles. Big as it is, there are 4.68 PEVs registered per 1,000 people in California, with four more states seeing 2-point-something per 1,000 people.

 The Nissan Leaf is the world's best selling plug-in car on a cumulative total basis with over 230,000 units. It's presently lagging now despite two upgrades to its battery specs along the way, and a new model with range competitive with the Bolt EV and Model 3 may get here by 2018, if not sooner.

The Nissan Leaf is the world’s best selling plug-in car on a cumulative total basis with over 230,000 units. It’s presently lagging now despite two upgrades to its battery specs along the way, and a new model with range competitive with the Bolt EV and Model 3 may get here by 2018, if not sooner.

Of course this does not compare to the poster child of PEV adoption, Norway, whose 5.1 million souls have given a collective hug to extremely well subsidized PEVs, as internal combustion cars are penalized effectively by policymakers. Today they buy about one PEV for every four cars registered.

California leads the U.S. Obviously Norway is an outlier, and is included just for the sake of trivia as the world's ultimate market, and to show what is possible. Norway is showing that PEVs are technologically feasible, even in a Nordic country, and although these are first-generation vehicles.

California leads the U.S. Obviously Norway is an outlier, and is included just for the sake of trivia as the world’s ultimate market, and to show what is possible. Norway is showing that PEVs are technologically feasible, even in a Nordic country, and although these are first-generation vehicles.

California is doing alright though, and only narrowly trails the Netherlands’ 5.83 PEVs per 1,000 people while also being the second biggest market next to the Peoples Republic of China.

As for the rest of the country, states offer varying consumer purchase subsidies over and above a federal tax credit available for $2,500-$7,500 depending on battery size. Actually California’s state incentives up to $2,500 are not as handsome as those of places like Connecticut offering up to $3,000 cash on the hood for qualified PEVs, or Colorado offering as high as $6,000.

A Rising Tide …

… Lifts all boats, goes the saying. In this case the rising tide is worldwide concerns over climate change which is causing policymakers in Europe, as well as California, to look ahead to a zero-emission goal by 2050.

Automakers wishing to do business in these rapidly expanding markets are having to toe the line. The new world’s largest car market, China, is also just waking up and pulling automakers into its frantic effort to clean the air in its cities where people may wear gas masks at times to protect their lungs.

Want a sense of urgency? OK, here’s one: The International Energy Agency, citing a dire need to curb rising temperatures from climate change, and goals set, said much more than today’s 1.7 million PEVs are needed.  “The wide global deployment of EVs [i.e., PEVs] across all modes is necessary to meet sustainability targets,” said the agency. “The EVI [Electric Vehicles Initiative] 20 by 20 target calls for an electric car fleet of 20 million by 2020 globally. The Paris Declaration on Electro-Mobility and Climate Change and Call to Action sets a global deployment target of 100 million electric cars and 400 million electric 2- and 3-wheelers in 2030.”

Want a sense of urgency? OK, here’s one: The International Energy Agency, citing a dire need to curb rising temperatures from climate change, and goals set, said much more than today’s 1.7 million PEVs are needed.
“The wide global deployment of EVs [i.e., PEVs] across all modes is necessary to meet sustainability targets,” said the agency. “The EVI [Electric Vehicles Initiative] 20 by 20 target calls for an electric car fleet of 20 million by 2020 globally. The Paris Declaration on Electro-Mobility and Climate Change and Call to Action sets a global deployment target of 100 million electric cars and 400 million electric 2- and 3-wheelers in 2030.”

Products developed even for particular markets – like China, Europe, or California – are then intellectual property the automakers may apply elsewhere, and meanwhile consumer demand has begun.

Probably the biggest indicator of this was Tesla’s announcement of its $35,000 Model 3. What was shown were models that would likely spec out for above the minimal price point, and much has to be seen with skeptics poking at Tesla on many fronts, but the takeaway was it motivated 400,000 people to plunk down $1,000 refundable deposits.

Volkswagen said this year it would introduce three new battery electric vehicles annually through 2025, along with PHEVs. It and all other automakers are moving in this direction.

Volkswagen said this year it would introduce three new battery electric vehicles annually through 2025, along with PHEVs. It and all other automakers are moving in this direction.

That signals intent, and demand, and Tesla’s Model S has also shown what a properly positioned product can do in the face of the “entrenched” legacy automakers.

This year, General Motors will be first to release its $37,500 Bolt EV which is intended to net down to $30,000 with the federal credit – while it lasts, assuming it’s not extended, which advocates have said could be possible.

The 200-plus mile range Chevy Bolt EV will be on sale by end of year.

The 200-plus mile range Chevy Bolt EV will be on sale by end of year.

Enabling these things is of course batteries. Costs per kilowatt-hour have plummeted enabling major automakers to follow others – like GM, Nissan and Tesla – with promised products in the next half decade projected to keep growth trending upward, barring further unforeseen events.

After six years of rhetoric alternately lauding and criticizing plug-in cars from every conceivable angle, today mainstream media frequently intone a new truism that ”the future” of transportation is electric, or at least that it will hold a much-more significant place, and sooner than some think.

As for the near term, Michigan-based analyst Alan Baum projects 152,000 PEVs will be sold by year’s end in the U.S., setting a new record, and a market share of 0.88 percent.

Tesla Model 3 prototype. Projected for release as soon as 2017. Company CEO Elon Musk said it wants to sell half a million Tesla models by 2018. Analysts have said they do not believe this is more than a stretch goal that won't be reached, though anything is possible. More certain is it is a goad to others.

Tesla Model 3 prototype. Projected for release as soon as late 2017. Company CEO Elon Musk said it wants to sell half a million Tesla models by 2018. Analysts have said they do not believe this is more than a stretch goal that won’t be reached, though anything is possible. More certain is it is a goad to others.

This would mean PEVs would likely surpass passenger diesels and with the next green car sub-category in their sites being regular hybrids which hold 2 percent today.

Capping off today’s news is August PEV sales were 14,973 units – the best monthly plug-in sales volume on record.

Special thanks to global sales tracker Mario R. Duran with help in compiling data and creating charts.

This article appears also at HybridCars.com.

 

Sep 01

California Continues To Pull More Than Its Weight In Plug-in Car Sales

 

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People wanting petroleum independence, cleaner air, and who’d like to see more automotive electrification may want to thank the state that is second only to China in cumulative plug-in electrified vehicle (PEV) sales.

That is, if California were its own country, only China would have purchased more PEVs within its borders. Alternately, if California was hypothetically not counted, and the rest of the U.S. were to be compared to other global markets, the U.S. would suddenly look like a relative laggard in the worldwide push toward electrification.

With its latest sales tally for the second quarter of 2016, the California New Car Dealers Association (CNCDA) reports overall sales are still up, and PEVs as well as regular hybrids continue to punch beyond their weight class compared to the rest of the U.S.

Year to date, despite the loss of green solo-access HOV stickers, plug-in hybrid sales growth continues with 14,737 registrations, or a “take rate” (market share) of 1.4 percent. By contrast, the U.S. as a whole including California has a PHEV take rate through June of 0.35 percent.

If one removed California’s contribution to what is yet a Lilliputian market, through June the U.S. total of 29,920 PHEVs according to the HybridCars.com Dashboard, would decline to just 15,183.

And the same story goes for battery electric vehicles – in California, BEVs are at 17,182 or 1.6 percent take rate. As a whole, including California, the U.S. is at 0.42 percent.

The U.S. BEV total through June is 34,245. If California’s part were removed, the tally would be 17,063.

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Who had the best-selling BEV? Did you have to ask? That would be home-grown Tesla, and its Model S which actually ranked second in its class after the BMW 5-series which only sold 60 more units. The Tesla S model’s 5,147 sales in California were 44 percent of the total 11,700 in the U.S. as a whole.

Regular hybrid electric vehicle sales are also substantial in the state that has spoken for more of them since before the newfangled cars with plugs became available.

The take rate in California is 4.5 percent, and volume is 47,002 registrations through June’s end. The U.S. has on the other hand, including California, purchased 194,005 for a 1.92 percent take rate. Subtract California’s total, and you have 147,003 or just 100,001 more.

Among hybrids, the Prius continues to do well, ranking behind the Honda Civic and Toyota Corolla in the “sub-compact” class.

SEE ALSO: California Plug-in Sales Led The US Last Year With Nearly Five-Times Greater Market Share

One reason California does so well is by itself it is America’s largest car market, outpacing second-place Texas by a good bit. Last year the Golden State accounted for 2,052,750 passenger vehicle sales out of the U.S. total of 17.47 million.

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This year through the first half, the state records 1,045,440 passenger vehicle sales – up from 1,017,198 for January-June 2015. Market growth however was stronger in Q1 when a 3.9-percent increase was measured, and Q2 saw just 1.8 percent uptick. The growth continues, but not at the pace of last year’s rise of 11.0 percent. The CNCDA predicts things may even flatten out or slightly decline in the next 6-12 months.

“But regardless of which direction sales head in, the preponderance of evidence indicates that the market should remain strong well into 2017,” says the CNCDA. “The combination of steady job growth, rising incomes, low fuel prices, attractive incentive offers, and low interest rates should help keep sales at healthy levels.”

California is also tracking similarly to the U.S. as a whole in its witness of declining car sales as consumers flock back to light trucks.

Specifically, passenger car sales declined 4.0 percent while light truck sales went up 12.8 percent in California. This compares to the U.S.’ 7.4-percent car sales decline and increase for light trucks by 10.3 percent.

Living In a European Frame of Mind

The other reason California has its outsized share of electrified cars is of course its Air Resources Board which sets rules alongside the U.S. EPA.

State regulators have won the right to set rules for their air quality, and with global developments, their concerns mirrors worldwide fretfulness now over not just smog and health-affecting air contaminants, but greenhouse emissions inducing climate change.

 Toyota's new RAV4 Hybrid hit the ground running this year. The nearest thing in its price category to what people want in an electrified SUV, its sales declare loud and clear a market void for plug-in SUVs ready for automakers to fill sooner or later.

Toyota’s new RAV4 Hybrid hit the ground running this year. The nearest thing in its price category to what people want in an electrified SUV, its sales declare loud and clear a market void for plug-in SUVs ready for automakers to fill sooner or later.

While automakers and other industry stakeholders contend at the moment over federal rules for 2022-2025, California is “not standing still,” according to one environmental advocate for the Natural Resources Defense Council. Rather, it is looking beyond 2030 and even 2050 at which time the goal for zero emissions is to have been met.

This year lawmakers nervous that a previously announced target for one in seven PEVs be sold in state by 2025 will not be met have attempted to champion legislation meant to strengthen that mandate.

While much has to be decided, to date, automakers are building cars just for California’s arcane system of rules requiring such clean cars in state.

Source: U.S. Department of Energy.

Source: U.S. Department of Energy.

As such, the large state of California has the highest concentration of PEVs per 1,000 people. Its 4.68 PEVs per 1,000 for 2015 eclipses Hawaii’s 2.94, Washington’s 2.32, Georgia’s 2.20, and Oregon’s 2.04. Actually, only five states had more than two plug-in vehicles registered per 1,000 people in 2015, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.

This year, on a cumulative basis since the dawn of PEVs, California is up to 5.83 registrations per 1,000 people compared to the U.S. total average of 1.51 per 1,000.

Not quite Norway, which exceeds California by 3.69 times, California does narrowly outpace PEV-absorbing Netherlands by 1.04 times.

In all, California has accounted for as much as 55 percent of the U.S. purchase of PEVs, and since 2010 its 223,620 sales accounts for 47.6 percent of all U.S. sales.

Not satisfied that it will do enough to stave off global climate change, its legislators continue to push for more.

Thanks to sales tracker Mario R. Duran for help with data for this report.

This article appears also at HybridCars.com.

 

Aug 31

Chevrolet Bolt EV ‘Production Intent’ Test Car Spotted, On-Sale Date Close

 

Note – We’ve reported a few times GM was on track to release the Chevy Bolt this year, and never really had any doubt. Did any of you? Fred Ligouri has told us what he told AN in this report, and GM’s Kevin Kelly said the same before him as well. GM has committed to a timeline, and it can meet it. Ahem. No further comment on that. On another note, GM sure is taking to the last minute to announce specs including EPA certs. Is this a tactic to create anticipation or some such? Unknown.

By Larry E. Hall

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For would-be Chevy Bolt buyers there’s good news.

Those rumors that have been floating around for the past couple of months that the battery-electric powered Bolt would be delayed by up to six months were just that — rumors.

Chevrolet confirmed yesterday that the electric hatchback is on schedule to be launched late this year, with sales to start soon after, trade publication Automotive News is reporting.

The Detroit automaker’s spokesman, Fred Ligouri, told the publication, “We’re on the same timeline we’ve always communicated. … Retail production of the 2017 Bolt EV begins later this year, and it will be in dealer showrooms shortly thereafter.”

For some time, General Motors’ engineers have been discovered testing pre-production Bolts around the Detroit area.

This past weekend, a blue Bolt was caught in a parking lot near a cars and coffee event just north of Detroit, and an Automotive News reporter snapped some photos.

The GM engineer driving the car referred to it as a “production-intent” vehicle.

Production intent is a term for vehicles that have all of the correct parts, finishes and colors.

This news coincides with a Hybrid Cars report two weeks ago that Korean battery and EV component supplier LG Electronics was gearing up its assembly line before the end of this month to provide components for the 2017 Bolt.

SEE ALSO: Key Questions Remaining Just a Few Months Before 2017 Chevy Bolt Launch

GM announced last March that the Chevy Bolt EV entered pre-production on the Orion assembly line.

In May we captured a screen shot of a document showing the Bolt with a “SORP Oct” (Start of Regular Production) mention at the Orion plant before it was replaced with one that removed the Bolt’s SORP.

The Bolt is estimated to be EPA certified for more than 200-miles range and to start at $37,500 before an eligible $7,500 federal tax credit and state incentives, which could let it net for mid-high 20s.

So, the Bolt delivery date isn’t far off, meaning buyers can be less antsy about waiting.

Automotive News

This article appears also at HybridCars.com.

 
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