Apr 18

VW Reveals Nationwide EV Charging Plans

 

By Jeff Nisewanger

Volkswagen will rapidly build a nationwide EV charging network at hundreds of sites across 40 states within the next 3 years, according to new plans revealed last week.

The new network stands to dramatically expand the long-distance driving utility of current and future all-electric vehicles. With power rates of up to 320 kilowatts, the network would rival, and in some ways exceed, today’s Tesla DC Supercharger network.

In any case, the charge rate anticipating future EVs is very high – the Chevy Bolt EV, for example, is for now limited to a nominal 50 kW DC fast charge rate. What this means is that expected future EVs could be recharged quick enough to make switching from fast-fueling internal combustion vehicles far less of a concern.

The spending plan is one part of the company’s so-called “dieselgate” court settlement finalized last year with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) over excessive pollution emitted from some its vehicles sold in the United States.

Volkswagen’s new plans add to a previously released California-specific draft plan which is pending approval by CARB later this month.

SEE ALSO: VW Reveals Tesla-like EV Charging Plans

The company, through its new Electrify America subsidiary, intends to spend a total of $500 million in each of four consecutive 30-month periods over the next 10 years. The money is divided primarily between community charging, highway charging, and public education projects with 40 percent of funds, or $800 million over the full 10 years, dedicated to California under the legal agreement.

As part of the first cycle of its investment plan, VW says it intends to spend $120 million on EV charging infrastructure in California and a further $250 million in the other states. Some of those funds would be set aside for operating expenses and long-term maintenance.

Of that combined $370 million, some $255 million would be used to develop nearly 300 ultra-fast DC charging locations along several dozen interstate and regional highways. Each location would typically have about five chargers although the number at any specific site would vary between four and 10.

Some of the first highway locations could be completed as early as next year. At least 200 of those locations would be completed by mid-2019 and another 90 are projected to be under active development and likely to be completed over the following year. The scope and pace of the planned installation schedule roughly mirrors the first years of Tesla’s DC Supercharger network in the U.S.

All of the highway chargers would be next-generation units designed to support a peak charging rate of at least 150 kilowatts and some would support up to 320 kilowatts. The sites are being designed to be “future proof” for medium to long-term use and will feature transformers and grid connections that allow for easy upgrades in later years.

The locations would be spaced an average of 66 miles apart so those closer to urban areas would be usable by most existing all-electric cars. The longest distance between charging locations would be set at 120 miles.

Almost all existing non-Tesla DC charging stations support between 25 and 50 kilowatts in the United States so VW’s new stations could support charging at up to 3 to 6 times faster when used with future vehicles.

Even some existing cars may be able to charge somewhat faster than they can on existing chargers. Chevrolet officials have hinted that the 2017 Bolt EV can reach a peak charge rate of perhaps around 20 percent faster. The Kia Soul EV and the new Hyundai Ioniq electric sedan can reportedly charge at a peak rate of up to 70 kilowatts.

A further $80 million during the first cycle would be spent on community charging at a total of around 650 locations in 16 metropolitan areas nationwide. Some 300 of those locations would be located in and around New York City, Washington D.C., Chicago, Portland, Boston, Seattle, Philadelphia, Denver, Houston, Miami, and Raleigh. In California, a heavier concentration of charging locations would be installed in and around Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Jose, San Diego, and Sacramento.

Most community-based charging would be focused on public locations such as retail shopping, parking garages, and so-called charging depots that would contain clusters of DC chargers. Locations with shorter turnovers would get 50 and even some 150 kilowatt chargers while longer-term parking areas would get slower 7 kilowatt AC charging. About a third of the charging would be located at workplaces. The remaining chargers would be installed at multi-unit residential complexes.

Estimated consumer EV charging prices are not yet known but the new VW charging stations will be open to all car models and will not be located at or near VW dealerships. Volkswagen will own the chargers and is allowed to operate them at a profit.

A separate aspect of the overall VW settlement includes a $2.7 billion environmental trust fund to be used as a source of project grants overseen by Native American tribal governments, individual states, and local agencies. VW also faces billions of dollars in other civil and criminal penalties.

VW Group is planning 30 BEVs by 2025, along with numerous plug-in hybrids. Shown: I.D. Buzz Concept.

Altogether, some 5,000 charging stalls supporting AC or DC charging would be built nationwide by the end of 2019. All DC chargers will feature both CHAdeMO and CCS standard plugs and AC charging will feature J1772 standard plugs. Tesla vehicles use a proprietary plug design but the company sells compatible adapters.

Tesla has built a fast DC Supercharger network of its own since late 2012 that supports maximum theoretical charging rates of up to 145 kilowatts at over 350 locations and 2,200 charging stalls across the country. Some existing Tesla vehicles can charge at a peak rate of about 120 kW at these stations. Tesla’s existing DC CHAdeMO adapter is limited to 50 kilowatts. Last year, the company joined the European CharIN consortium that is leading the development of CCS.

SEE ALSO: VW Settlement May Supercharge non-Tesla DC Rollout in US

Most of these Tesla sites are located along highways away from large metropolitan areas and are primarily intended for use by travelers on long-distance trips. Some of VW’s community charging locations will have 150 kilowatt and 50 kilowatt charging but the plan is vague about how many and where.

By the time VW has completed its first buildout of charging stations in 2019, Tesla itself will likely have greatly expanded their Supercharger network to support an expected wave of less expensive Model 3 sedans hitting the road late this year.

The new electric chargers are expected to support flexible payment schemes including both simple credit cards and subscription-based plans. VW said they aim to create shared billing agreements with other charging providers. This presumably would be similar to or include the ROEV Association being created to link the billing systems of ChargePoint and EVgo.

EVgo, a spin-off of the NRG electric utility, today has a nationwide network of over 900 DC charging stations at over 600 locations but they are 50 kilowatt or less and are often clustered in big cities leaving large gaps without charging on the highway.

At California’s request, VW has plans to concentrate a further $44 million towards so-called Green City initiatives that seek to demonstrate transformative use of electric vehicles within a city. Sacramento has been tentatively identified as the first city to be targeted to receive services such as electric car sharing along with electric delivery and taxi fleets.

In order to promote public awareness of electric vehicles, VW plans to spend about $20 million of its California budget and a further $25 million or so from its non-California national budget. About half of that spending would go towards television ads beginning this fall.

The exact locations for VW’s highway DC chargers have not been decided yet but the routes are being influenced by this Designated EV Charging Corridor map published by the Federal Highway Administration.

VW has no plans to fund hydrogen fuel cell vehicle filling stations during this first round of spending but may do so in the future. California is strongly encouraging VW to add hydrogen fueling investments in later years.

VW says their expenses for personnel and other administrative overhead will be about 8 percent of the overall budget.

The company has already held a round of meetings with suppliers and plans to begin negotiating contracts. It says it does not intend to “reinvent the wheel” and will purchase hardware and software from existing companies. It plans to operate the network in a sustainable long-term fashion “in line with the same economic constraints faced by others in the charging industry”. In the past, ChargePoint has strongly urged that VW not be allowed to use its diesel settlement funds to unfairly dominate the industry.

This article appears also at HybridCars.com.

This entry was posted on Tuesday, April 18th, 2017 at 5:55 am and is filed under General. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

COMMENTS: 30


  1. 1
    Rashiid Amul

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (7:13 am)

    Give up on hydrogen and spend the money on more charging stations.

    When will the plugs become standard? Is there really a need for multiple types?

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    john1701a

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (7:43 am)

    Speed of the chargers is a bigger deal. Having a network of slow electrical connections isn’t all that useful. It’s extremely expense to get them setup, then there’s operating expenses. High kWh rates during peak demand well cost the owner a lot to provide.

    What kind of price for use should be passed on to those plugging in?

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    MnVikes

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (7:43 am)

    The map looks very political to me. Makes me want to go buy a big truck.

    B.S

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    bro1999

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (8:09 am)

    Living on the east coast (MD), that map makes me a happy Bolt owner. 🙂

    And that only shows VW’s planned build-out, not existing and future stations from other provider.s

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  5. 5
    Dan Petit/Petit Technical College

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (8:35 am)

    Speaking about more software fraud, we have a new way to prove that tablet scanners have bogus fault codes being displayed for vehicles, which are wasting millions of dollars of shop and customer money, and not only fail in processing analytics to diagnose unsafe operating fault conditions, but simultaneously fail to process faults causing emissions to remain non compliant.

    This is done without decompiling the code, and preserving the exact set of degradations to repeat the proof procedures.

    Just another nail for the ICE coffin.

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    Ziv

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (8:38 am)

    150 kW chargers are impressive even if the 320’s only show up in small numbers. Reliability will be a critical aspect of this charging system. If you pull up and all 4 chargers are down, or 2 are down and there is a huge line for the 2 remaining chargers, it will be a real problem. I would hope that the larger charging stations with 8 to 10 chargers would be more reliable but that remains to be seen.
    I wonder if the next generation of BEV’s will have 75 kWh packs as a base rather than the seeming norm of 60 this year. Fast charging a 75 kWh pack quickly is a lot easier due to the probable reduction in charge tapering towards the end of the 12 to 20 minutes your car is charging. I doubt most BEV drivers will top their packs off, they will just charge up from 10% to 60% and head back on the highway without watching their charge rate taper off at the end.
    All in all, I am kind of happy that Volkswagen cheated on their emissions test. A ton of pollution but it will lead to a nationwide system of fast chargers.
    I do hope that the system goes nationwide like the SC network is doing.

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    jbakerjonathan

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (9:49 am)

    Four things that struck me as I read this very good article:

    I rejoiced when I read that there will be an advertising campaign that will be properly funded. There is nothing like seeing ads about how easy it is to refuel these new-fangled ‘lectric cars to get people interested in buying them. GM’s waiting game is about to pay off for their stockholders.

    I hope very good thought goes into the theory of placement of the urban stations. The simplistic thought of “if you build it, they will come” probably won’t work. The stations have to be located where people will be willing to leave their cars overnight. It has to be convenient and safe.

    A big flag began to wave when I saw that VW would be allowed to make a PROFIT on these installations. My initial reaction was to have rates charged by VW controlled like power companies are today, not to let them be set by VW itself. How this plays off with the other corporate businesses (i.e., ChargePoint) I’m not sure.

    I hope that the fossil fuel cartel doesn’t muck this up!

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    Loboc

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (10:10 am)

    I don’t normally travel interstate that much. This is an issue for people going to lakes and other recreation areas that are off the beaten path. For one of my normal trips to Missouri, the interstate travel route would cost me an extra 50 miles or one hour.

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    Dave G

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (10:24 am)

    Call me a heretic, but I actually believe this type of news is harmful.

    When the average public reads this, the underlying message is clear: EVs are not viable until public charging are everywhere. And since they’ve never even seen a public charging station, their obvious conclusion is that EVs are not yet viable.

    Meanwhile, the truth is exactly the opposite. With a range extended EV, or with a BEV + another car for longer trips, we can replace over 90% of the gasoline we use today, just by charging at home.

    So this whole push for public charging stations, who really needs it? If you’re concerned with climate change, that last 10% of gasoline use can be converted to sustainable bio-fuels, with no affect on food supply, just by using stuff we throw away today. In fact, by removing excess corn stover from fields, farmers actually grow more food, not less:
    http://www.dupont.com/products-and-services/industrial-biotechnology/advanced-biofuels/uses-applications/corn-stover.html

    Higher corn yields have resulted in a higher level of residue, which can pose a challenge for growers. Excess residue harbors disease, interferes with planting, impedes stand establishment and monopolizes nitrogen. Removing a portion of corn stover from high-productivity fields before planting can improve establishment, growth and yield.

    On-farm research in Iowa showed an additional 5.2 bushels per acre on average for fields replanted to corn after partial stover harvest the preceding fall. Long-term field trials have been initiated to further verify and monitor the results of this program.

    If you’re religiously opposed to bio-fuels, that last 10% can be replaced with something else. In any case, that last 10% is not much to worry about. We have bigger fish to fry.

    So let’s stop shooting ourselves in the foot by talking about public charging, and start talking about how we can get everyone to charge at home.

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    Kdawg

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (10:47 am)

    “Altogether, some 5,000 charging stalls supporting AC or DC charging would be built nationwide by the end of 2019”

    Seems really ambitious to me. I’m sure there will be a lot of progress by end of 2019, but I don’t think they’ll hit 5000 stalls.

    I also wish they would spread this out across the country more. California is already well aware of EVs. Seems like more education is needed elsewhere.

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    Mark Z

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (10:56 am)

    Tesla drivers are upset over lower Supercharger kW settings. They also slow down as the battery reaches a higher SOC. Charging at home is best. Save the ICE car for the long haul trips.

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    KNS

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (11:16 am)

    From the article, “Volkswagen will own the chargers and is allowed to operate them at a profit.”

    This means that the expended capital will not be a burden to shareholders. VW and its shareholders should not be rewarded for the company’s malfeasance.

    KNS

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    volt11

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (1:05 pm)

    I wonder if anyone will make DC fast charging for plug-in hybrids/EREVs? Opportunity charging up a Volt from empty in a few minutes would be a lovely proposition, but for now GM seems to think the nobody with an ICE backup needs or wants more than 3.3KW, even in the new plug-in CT6. 🙁

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  14. 14
    Dakster

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (2:48 pm)

    KNS:
    From the article, “Volkswagen will own the chargers and is allowed to operate them at a profit.”

    This means that the expended capital will not be a burden to shareholders.VW and its shareholders should not be rewarded for the company’s malfeasance.

    KNS

    I caught that statement too and feel the same way.

    $8M from VW is coming to Alaska – really isn’t enough to do a whole lot with. Although I would like to see some public charging stations put in. Maybe branching out a little from Anchorage so you could drive a longer range BEV from Anchorage to/from the Kenai and Fairbanks without range anxiety.

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    American First

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (3:27 pm)

    volt11:
    I wonder if anyone will make DC fast charging for plug-in hybrids/EREVs? Opportunity charging up a Volt from empty in a few minutes would be a lovely proposition, but for now GM seems to think the nobody with an ICE backup needs or wants more than 3.3KW, even in the new plug-in CT6. 🙁

    This was discussed before. Someone mentioned that the regenerative braking produces many kW of power, but that comes directly from the motor/generator(s). An external DC charger must attach directly to the battery and that will void factory warranties for the hybrids or GM’s EREVs.

    For now, the only point that one can probably add a DC charge point is at the output of the onboard AC charger, and that has to be monitored while charging. Maybe the battery can allow over 4 kW of DC charging at that point, but unless someone does it carefully and post the results, I doubt any active hybrid or Volt owner will attempt to bypass the AC charger for a DC charge.

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    James

     

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (5:20 pm)

    Mark Z:
    Tesla drivers are upset over lower Supercharger kW settings. They also slow down as the battery reaches a higher SOC. Charging at home is best. Save the ICE car for the long haul trips.

    That’s scary to hear for a person considering a Tesla for their future!

    I think the private sector has to pitch in – and it has to happen fairly quickly.

    Counting on the manufacturer of a vehicle to also build out a fueling infrastructure
    seems over the top. Tesla has done great, but it’s far too little.

    Just look at the lines at popular Superchargers over holidays. Tesla has tried
    valets at Superchargers, and I can see Autopilot being used in the future, if
    wireless inductive chargers take over. The car senses it’s fully charged, backs
    itself out of the stall and parks itself in a holding area. These stations would
    need to be manned, as the liabilities of someone being run over is large.

    If ICE cars are still needed – it makes a final point that EVs are not the
    future – as in, they cannot do what an ICE can do.

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  17. 17
    James

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (5:29 pm)

    Model 3 is going to put stresses on Superchargers that will make news.

    The former great PR Tesla has in the collective “psychological bank” of the general public
    will erode quickly once people cannot fuel their Model 3s, and lines go around the
    block as they wait to juice up.

    EV fans most often look to government to bolster a future charging infrastructure. That
    is stinkin’ thinkin’ in so many ways. Our west coast EV highway project resulted in
    spotty coverage on major interstates and big holes near major cities where local L2s
    were supposed to take the load. Ecotricity partnered with federal and state
    government and took over $100 million and went bankrupt. Toss the government
    big checks to get it done, and we see these results. The Blink chargers Ecotricity
    put up are often broken and out of order. It’s a total mess.

    As I’ve said many times, the private sector needs to build out the modern EV
    highway. There’ll be big corporations at first, like Home Depot and Costco that
    put up rows of fast chargers – and later, smaller businesses will put them up
    to lure business to their establishment. Again – if Home Depot has chargers
    and Lowe’s doesn’t – customers will shop at Home Depot, something Lowe’s
    will have nothing of. Soon, the momentum of new charger locations will
    turn from a trickle to a flood.

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  18. 18
    James

     

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (5:42 pm)

    The major players like Aerovironment and ChargePoint need to approach corporations
    with a valid business plan, and stop petitioning governments to get the job done.

    We need a charging station within a mile or two in the suburbs and within blocks in cities.
    This is totally doable in five years. Will the influx of Model 3s needing a charge
    ruin Tesla or organically grow our refueling infrastructure? Time will tell.

    Europe is already seeing creative solutions. The fast charge chain that has stations
    located near major thoroughfares that has McDonalds-like golden arches has started
    making a small profit. It still is a flawed plan as cars have to sit for too long to
    make it workable without long lines developing.

    The effort Tesla is making to add Superchargers at gas stations is a flawed plan
    also. Just the fact that cars have to sit there for 1/2 – 1 hour kills it before it’s
    started. Nobody has that kind of real estate to have filled for that amount of time
    to make it profitable.

    On another website, I saw a U.K. company that is planning stores that are
    surrounded by EV charging stations in all the parking slots. Inside the store is
    a convenience store, theater, coffee shop, barber shop – all those places that
    you can go and receive a service while your car fast charges outside. This is
    the creative think that is needed to change the world into an EV one.

    My idea is stacking. Look to large urban areas who now stack cars in parking
    “shelves” to better utilize small parking spaces. Google Chinese parking
    lots to see these stacks of cars – there are even pictures of car stacking
    from NYC and Chicago in the early 1900s. A “ChargePark” could be a rack you pull
    up to and plug in – then your car is raised to the top so another can pull in
    underneath. When you return to your car, you swipe your card and the rack
    rotates your car down to you. I saw this concept recently on another website.
    Someone was reading my mind!

    We need a whole lot more creativity if EVs are going to eventually replace
    ICEs. Think of all the apartment and condo dwellers that cannot charge
    at home!

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  19. 19
    Dakster

     

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (5:46 pm)

    James: That’s scary to hear for a person considering a Tesla for their future!

    I think the private sector has to pitch in – and it has to happen fairly quickly.

    Counting on the manufacturer of a vehicle to also build out a fueling infrastructure
    seems over the top. Tesla has done great, but it’s far too little.

    Just look at the lines at popular Superchargers over holidays. Tesla has tried
    valets at Superchargers, and I can see Autopilot being used in the future, if
    wireless inductive chargers take over. The car senses it’s fully charged, backs
    itself out of the stall and parks itself in a holding area. These stations would
    need to be manned, as the liabilities of someone being run over is large.

    If ICE cars are still needed – it makes a final point that EVs are not the
    future – as in, they cannot do what an ICE can do.

    We are in a transportation transition period. Until the infrastructure catches up, not all of us can rely on BEVs. (me included).

    Also, I doubt anyone will be able to make a heavy duty pickup for the RVer that will be a BEV using currently available technology. Hybrid yes, EREV yes, pure BEV not yet. If new battery tech comes out and really high charging rates, then maybe. Dr. Goodenogh may provide that breakthru soon too. (But it isn’t here commercially yet) OTR will be hard too, BUT, since there are planned routes, planned stops… If needed the container part could have batteries lined underneath it. It will take a lot of changes in how that industry works, but it could be done. So unless “Solar Freakin’ Roadways” gets better and can wireless charge your EV while you are driving on highways. ICE will be needed.

    I’m happy for the EV changes coming and infrastructure changes coming as well. If we get the low hanging fruit first, the rest will get figured out along the way. Low hanging fruit are the people that drive cars/suvs, but don’t need to pull that much. Daily commuters. Even if there is still the need for an ICE vehicle in the household.

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  20. 20
    James

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (5:58 pm)

    JUST ADD CHARGERS

    2o11G1c
    underground stacking

    2o0QZeP

    small outdoor stacking ( apartments/condos/workplaces )

    VW-dry-stack.jpg

    large scale stacking

    parking_3.jpg

    urban stacking

    parkmatic.jpeg

    New York based ParkMatic rotary parking system – Just add chargers!

    ea8ac53a1a494d4bccf8801bff4461f2.jpg

    Verticle Parking Lot – Chicago circa 1932

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  21. 21
    James

     

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (6:13 pm)

    Dakster: We are in a transportation transition period. Until the infrastructure catches up, not all of us can rely on BEVs. (me included).

    Also, I doubt anyone will be able to make a heavy duty pickup for the RVer that will be a BEV using currently available technology. Hybrid yes, EREV yes, pure BEV not yet. If new battery tech comes out and really high charging rates, then maybe. Dr. Goodenogh may provide that breakthru soon too. (But it isn’t here commercially yet) OTR will be hard too, BUT, since there are planned routes, planned stops… If needed the container part could have batteries lined underneath it. It will take a lot of changes in how that industry works, but it could be done.So unless “Solar Freakin’ Roadways” gets better and can wireless charge your EV while you are driving on highways. ICE will be needed.

    I’m happy for the EV changes coming and infrastructure changes coming as well. If we get the low hanging fruit first, the rest will get figured out along the way. Low hanging fruit are the people that drive cars/suvs, but don’t need to pull that much. Daily commuters. Even if there is still the need for an ICE vehicle in the household.

    Agreed.

    While Tesla will undoubtedly suffer from lack of charging for 400,000+ Model 3s, Xs and Ss,
    Musk pushes ahead with the Tesla Semi – a great application, but one needing fast charging
    on regular routes. How to set that up while trying to avoid stackup problems at the
    400+ Supercharging locations he already has for private transportation? Hmmm… Biting off
    more than he can chew comes to mind.

    All this while there is a persistent rumor that one of the people secretly waiting
    to vacation tour around the moon on a Falcon rocket is Musk, the man himself!
    That could kill Tesla in one second – the time it takes for that rocket to fail! – This
    is something nobody expects, but could be a possibility.

    This all rolls back to GM and this idea of the EREV – PHEV. Still, with all these
    challenges ahead of mass adoption and quick, convenient recharging – the
    prospect of a 80-100 mile EREV or PHEV takes on a new shine. It’s an EV without
    this incredible mountain to climb of a new workable refueling infrastructure!

    Go Volt!

    It brings back that $1 trillion question – Maybe Tesla should have made an
    EREV/PHEV in the first place. The VIA pickup truck is a very strong
    argument indeed.

    All the major ICEmakers could build the VIA version of their truck tomorrow
    if they wished. In the sheer scale they build them – the cost would be very
    affordable to the consumer.

    Solid State batteries = great. But at this point, it’s pie-in-the-sky. Just another technology that might, maybe be out there –
    someday. These solutions are here today.

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  22. 22
    James

     

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (6:32 pm)

    My dream of privately-owned business buildout of fast chargers would
    be best if we add the proposition of inductive charging.

    Like it or not- John and Mary Q. Public see plugging in as a hassle, while
    strangely, waiting in line for a stinky, volatile gas pump is not!
    Getting out into the elements to stand there in the cold wind
    and rain? – No problem. It’s what we’re used to.

    This all changes when we pull into the spot and walk away, charging
    starts automatically. It would also behoove the progress if the billing
    was automatic as well. When the car communicates with the charger,
    it knows your information and bills you accordingly.

    Clean, easy, automatic – BING, BAM BOOM!

    This has to be the future. Seems a no brainer. Naturally, this will
    have to evolve, as in-ground systems cost more. Yet think of the
    reliability benefits in the long term. Today, tons of public chargers suffer
    from vandalism and breakdowns. Especially a bummer when there
    aren’t that many to go around in the first place!

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (7:25 pm)

    Kdawg: Seems really ambitious to me.I’m sure there will be a lot of progress by end of 2019, but I don’t think they’ll hit 5000 stalls.

    I also wish they would spread this out across the country more.California is already well aware of EVs.Seems like more education is needed elsewhere.

    On Topic – ( I know, wow! James! )

    I’m just done with VW.

    First, it’s hard to get over the systematic, premeditated planning of duping us all
    into thinking TDI was a good option.

    Now look online to see unused stadium parking lots filled with tens of thousands
    of TDIs turned in by bamboozled customers. There’s a vacant Mitsubishi car plant
    whose parking lot will hold 100,000s of turned-in TDIs, the drone footage is
    so sad – all those cars, useless – ready to be crushed or sold to developing
    countries.

    VW may not even exist in it’s current form next year. The losses it incurred
    are astounding. They were toppled from the #1 largest car company in the world
    to a groveling mess in an instant. Welcome to the car business!

    I don’t trust VW further than I can throw them. All these EV concepts flooding
    world car shows, the umpteenth concept of a VW microbus and all the
    stupid PR. Volkswagen is struggling to survive right now. I fully expect some
    merger or buyout within one year.

    So how does this equate to this hope of a boost to our charging grid? Well,
    it sounds great. It seems VW can help. But what is truly happening behind the
    scenes is VW is struggling to survive as a company. If they are not
    bought or merged, there probably won’t be many if any chargers built.

    The group established by VW to “make amends” by going electric seems like a stalling tactic to governments who nailed them. To me – this doesn’t establish any real hope in me that this will help the growing problem of lack of EV charging solutions.

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (7:41 pm)

    We say EREV/PHEV is a transition – but indeed it’s truly more of a solution.

    To me, GM solved the EV conundrum with EREV/Voltech.

    Look at the amazing increase of range from gen 1 to gen 2. Imagine if that
    were in a VIA Truck! The 2nd gen would be out by now with an AER of about
    45+ miles! All without range anxiety or a need for off-site charging.

    Add the fact that commercial truck use would mean more companies putting
    fast chargers on their fleet lots – and no public fist fights and ICE’d facebook
    pages, because you just plain don’t need a public charge to keep doing
    what you need to do.

    With the sheer amounts of oil we are pulling out of the ground these days,
    we could just stop all imports completely. When 100 mile EREVs/PHEVs
    surface – the use of gasoline will plummet. Each year less and less.

    A subcompact EREV could do well with a 2 or 3 cylinder range extender.
    More energy dense batteries are a given.

    When I see a Malibu in the wild, I am surprised just how large a car it is.
    It’s really a pig – like the Impala. We have to face it.

    Hybridization can mean Americans can keep driving those big pigs and
    use far less gasoline.

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (8:11 pm)

    Where are the west coasters?

    Why does this site die after the east coasters leave for home from work?

    Seems I start posting and the site is dead of late.

    Used to be at this time of day the westies take over the conversation.
    Is the weather out there just too good? Have they lost interest?

    Where’s the conversation? Even Raymond has exited stage left.
    I see him commenting on other websites around.

    Myself, I’m going to promote this site around the social media
    spectrum of EV users, Volt/Bolt EV and Tesla fans.

    We need GM-Volt, don’t let it die!

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (11:27 pm)

    James: Where are the west coasters?

    Coasting to the post office to pay our extra excessive California taxes!

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    Apr 18th, 2017 (11:38 pm)

    James: If ICE cars are still needed…

    Only needed on long distance drives where time is of the essence or if you need a spare vehicle during auto body repairs. It can take far less time to order and wait for a new car.

    (IMHO, avoid possible frustration, hold onto your Chevy Volt!)

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    Apr 19th, 2017 (12:12 am)

    James you do know Tesla is doubling their supercharging network in 2017 right? This should alleviate the congestion at most of the stations and prepare the network for the influx of Model 3 that will hit the market this year and for the 5,000 a week that they will ramp up to in 2018. Also Musk mentioned that he will be increasing the max charging capability which will speed up the process of charging especially when it comes to the large 100kW battery packs that will no doubt be standard for the X and S in 2018. I suspect that they will be behind for a little while but with the influx of the other fast chargers being built there should be plenty of opportunities to charge if needed.

    As for the holiday travel some Superchargers will be overwhelmed just like the gas station that I had to wait at for over an hour during my trip from Vegas to San Diego over Thanksgiving with traffic so bad that my 5 hour trip took almost 10.

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    Apr 19th, 2017 (5:17 am)

    Recoil:
    James you do know Tesla is doubling their supercharging network in 2017 right? e standard for the X and S in 2018.I suspect that they will be behind for a little while but with the influx of the other fast chargers being built there should be plenty of opportunities to charge if needed.

    I’ve been tracking Supercharger rollout and it’s slow.

    Only a couple coming online in the next few weeks.

    The 20 station installation in Fremont – presumably for Model 3s in the holding lot not
    far from the factory has been in construction for nearly 1 1/2 years and not finished.
    An experimental 20 unit Supercharger station is operational in Nebbenes, Norway –
    a very interesting layout, the only one of it’s kind in the world that I know of. Instead
    of a row of Superchargers, they’re in a lot with more of a drive-thru format, better
    for driving in one way, go to the forward-most unit that is open, and pull out – more
    like a gas station.

    Sure, they’ll be faster in the future, but Supercharger openings are paced rather
    slowly – too slow for the onrush of new Model 3s to come. Faster charging times
    will help, but that too is slow coming. It’s going to be gridlock at the Superchargers.

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    Apr 19th, 2017 (6:04 am)

    James,

    James: I’ve been tracking Supercharger rollout and it’s slow.

    Only a couple coming online in the next few weeks.

    The 20 station installation in Fremont – presumably for Model 3s in the holding lot not
    far from the factory has been in construction for nearly 1 1/2 years and not finished.
    An experimental 20 unit Supercharger station is operational in Nebbenes, Norway –
    a very interesting layout, the only one of it’s kind in the world that I know of. Instead
    of a row of Superchargers, they’re in a lot with more of a drive-thru format, better
    for driving in one way, go to the forward-most unit that is open, and pull out – more
    like a gas station.

    Sure, they’ll be faster in the future, but Supercharger openings are paced rather
    slowly – too slow for the onrush of new Model 3s to come. Faster charging times
    will help, but that too is slow coming. It’s going to be gridlock at the Superchargers.

    You also have to remember that all the new Tesla’s will only have 1,000 miles worth of charging per year before they have to start paying for it. Tesla is also charging for those that leave their car on the charger after it is done. This will free up a lot as people charge their car at home and don’t leave them on the the chargers for any longer than needed to charge

    Since those new rules have been implemented there have been almost no problems at the charging stations. You have to remember that the vast majority of charging station NEVER have any traffic jam. There are only a few that had problems and I am sure the Tesla is working to reduce those.

    Right now there are around 373 Supercharging places with around 2,600 superchargers in North America. As I said the vast majority have ZERO traffic jams. The plan is by the end of this year to have over 600 locations and 5,000 chargers in North America. This should easily meet the demand on all but the few days a year when everyone travels.

    Tesla will probably only pump out under 30,000 M3 this year and won’t hit their stride until next year allowing for them to increase the size of the Supercharging network even more before the majority of the M3 hit the streets.

    When taken with the new CSS/chademo chargers coming on line along with the current CSS/chademo. Fast charging will not be an issue 99% of the time.

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