Jan 06

Steve Wozniak trades Old Tesla For New Chevy Bolt

 

Woz_Bolt-668x409

The co-founder of Apple Steve “Woz” Wozniak has been very publically eyeing a Chevy Bolt EV, and on Tuesday announced he bit the bullet and got one.

Prior reporting had him saying he’d not buy a Tesla Model 3, after Chevrolet grabbed his attention with the $37,495 Bolt with 238 miles range.

After some back and forth on Facebook, Woz said today an older Model S was out, and the new Bolt is in. He still retains a Model S P100D, a Hummer, and Mercedes S-Class but says the Bolt will be the main car.

His Facebook announcement today has been getting lots of likes, several shares, and while he’d said little there Tuesday on his thinking, he’d previously been quoted on how he saw things.

“Gary, after seeing the insides and the UI [User Interface], Tesla will have a difficult time selling me a Model 3,” he said on Facebook to a friend. “A lot of things wrong with the Tesla Model S are done correctly (my opinion) in this car. But it’s still missing a place to put your sunglasses, ha ha.”

It appears functionality put him over the top.

“I tell everyone that the most valuable, useful car of my life was the Prius that I drove for 10 years. I don’t need top-of-the-line luxury. We have a Tesla but there is no other EV choice that’s good for road trips. The Bolt will need some personal testing by [his wife] Janet and myself to find out how it is on road trips. Otherwise, it’s what we want. Extra features aren’t the big picture, or we’d have skipped the Tesla for a Mercedes.”

Hat tip Brian Ro.

HybridCars.com

This entry was posted on Friday, January 6th, 2017 at 5:55 am and is filed under General. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

COMMENTS: 44


  1. 1
    BAZINGA

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (6:06 am)

    I wonder how many iPhone’s and iPad’s were autographed during his delivery.

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  2. 2
    Dan Petit/Petit Technical College

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (6:54 am)

    One of the finest “done deals” you could have.

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  3. 3
    Dan Petit/Petit Technical College

     

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (8:10 am)

    On the front page, those who are trying to defeat ERDTT may damage the traction battery longevity.

    This is because when any battery is too cold, the output capabilities are greatly reduced.

    When that naturally lower output is overtasked, you are overloading that battery.

    So be careful whose advice you consider valid.

    You also have WOT to confer with.

    So, when DIYers destroy your battery with their cavalier, bad advice, do not blame the carefully-crafted Volt engineering that they have ignorantly misled you to defeat.

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  4. 4
    Tim Hart

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (8:13 am)

    Even the rich and famous can have some common sense!

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  5. 5
    don shaw

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (8:24 am)

    Cleantechnica posted the following article:

    “Chevy Bolt EV Review, From One Of The First Buyers To Get One”

    There are 3 positive comments included in the comments section from 3 volt buyers (reprinted below). An extract “They hit it out of the park with the Bolt”

    Cleantechnica posted “Ladogaboy’s” (positive) review of the Bolt, (previously posted on our GM-Volt forum), but went on to emphasize “Ladogaboy’s concerns about the dealership and GM delivery delays”
    Imho, while I share “Ladogaboy concerns about GM delivery and dealers” they gave Cleantechnica the opportunity to de-emphasize the positive and excellent performance and characteristics of the Bolt and add negative inferences

    Most of the (62) of the comments also dealt mainly with the dealership and delivery concerns, reflecting the negative emphasis of the main article

    3 positive comments are as follow:

    Tom Wilcox • 5 hours agoWhat I like the most about this car thus far is: heated steering wheel, keyless entry, remote start, one-pedal driving, really nice and easy to use display screens, and the roominess inside. My wife likes it too (no small feat for GM). It’s a very fun car to drive … couldn’t be happier. If you’re still waiting for your Bolt, you will love this car!
    Our dealer experience was very good especially considering we had to order the car before the configurator went live; thankfully the interior color “guess” based on the Volt was pretty good. Dealer sales rep was very good on how to operate the car; the rear view camera is taking a little to get used to but I use the conventional mirror mostly.

    Todd • 7 hours ago
    My quick review:
    I went on a 10 minute test drive at the San Diego auto show a couple days ago. They had three available for test drives (3x more than the other models) so the wait was not long for me as it was at the end of the show. They told me that demand had been extremely high.

    Since I drive a Leaf, that’s what I compare to. The interior is incredibly spacious and comfortable, but I couldn’t help but feel the seats were a little tight. I would call them sporty seats, but I think larger people might feel cramped. My very tall father-in-law got in and had plenty of headroom, so I was impressed by that. Cargo space appears to be less than my Leaf, which is very disappointing. I’m not sure why they couldn’t add a few extra inches to really increase the utility of it.

    The screen and available information was awesome. As an engineer, I enjoy seeing lots of data and the Bolt gives plenty.

    As for performance, this thing could move! I enjoy the instant torque of the Leaf, so you can imagine that having the torque and higher speeds was amazing. Low gear was a little too much regen for me and having it come to a complete stop doesn’t seem too useful. I did like that it doesn’t creep in Low gear though as that is very useful at a light. Although, I can manage the same effect by putting the Leaf in Park. In my past Mercedes I could tap the brake hard at a light and it would prevent creep. I see that as the most effective implementation for most cars. Having the paddle regen on demand is one of the better features and I would probably use that over low gear mode.

    Overall, they hit it out of the park with the Bolt. If it was available 1.5 years ago when I bought my Leaf, I might have considered it. However, the massive effective price difference between the two cars still makes the Leaf an incredible value and probably the better choice for most people.
    see more

    Herr Kottkamp • 10 hours ago
    I pre-ordered one at a local SoCal dealership in mid-November. Was also originally promised “early December” delivery, then “just before Christmas”, then “by end of year”. They ultimately ended up chasing me to sing docs my midnight of December 31st, even though the cars weren’t on the lot yet. In short, the process left a lot to be desired.

    Fortunately, another local dealer did get three cars in and I was able to test drive a Premier trim Bolt last week. It was nothing short of fantastic! While I will miss a few creature comforts like the electric seats in my Audi, I get it. It’s not a luxury car. Nonetheless, Chevy’s engineers hit it out of the park on this one. Great build, ride and overall ergonomics.

    My negatives so far are that the dealerships seem pretty clueless on the vehicle. I have talked to several. There has been little or no staff training on the car and the salespeople generally don’t have any idea what they are selling. I usually know a lot more than the salesperson. Major fail. Get it together Chevy!

    As of this morning, the dealership sitting on my deposit “hopes to get some in by the end of the week, but we aren’t sure.”

    Final Score: Engineering Department: A+ Sales Department: D

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  6. 6
    Jim I

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (8:26 am)

    Enjoy your new car Woz!!!!

    Jim – C-5277

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  7. 7
    volt11

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (8:35 am)

    I hope A) the Woz story goes viral; B) GM is really prepared to sell a ton of Bolts if the market demands. We know there are 400,000 Model 3 deposits out there that might be swayed by such things.

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  8. 8
    bro1999

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (8:48 am)

    volt11:
    I hope A) the Woz story goes viral; B) GM is really prepared to sell a ton of Bolts if the market demands. We know there are 400,000 Model 3 deposits out there that might be swayed by such things.

    The official Chevrolet Electric Facebook page already reposted Woz’s post of picking up his Bolt. They are all over it. 😉 Funny to see all the GM haters post about how the Woz is just a shill that got paid off by GM. Lol

    Good color choice too! Exactly the same as my Bolt. We can be Bolt buddies. 😀

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    Steverino

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (9:13 am)

    Nice to see WOZ’s common sense drive the purchase rather than ego.

    Dan Petit/Petit Technical College:
    On the front page, those who are trying to defeat ERDTT may damage the traction battery longevity.

    This is because when any battery is too cold, the output capabilities are greatly reduced.

    When that naturally lower output is overtasked, you are overloading that battery.

    So be careful whose advice you consider valid.

    You also have WOT to confer with.

    So, when DIYers destroy your battery with their cavalier, bad advice, do not blame the carefully-crafted Volt engineering that they have ignorantly misled you to defeat.

    The Volt’s ICE does not heat the battery during ERDTT, so the defeat (a resistor tricking the air temp sensor into reading a higher air temp) will have zero effect on the battery longevity. BTW, WOT was the one who originally proposed the idea, later picked up and implemented on the Volt lead engineer’s (Frank Webber) own car. So no worries.

    The Bolt EV has no ICE of course, further proof that one is not needed for battery longevity, no?

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  10. 10
    bro1999

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (9:34 am)

    More from The Woz (Bolt is better than a Tesla in every way except for fast charging, basically). And he gives a yuuuuuuge middle finger to the fake news pushers like Electrek.co Lol

    Screenshot_20170106-0553113_zps5yvqubsu.png

    Screenshot_20170106-0618232_zpsjyau3lot.png

    Hopefully that worked.

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  11. 11
    Dan Petit/Petit Technical College

     

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (9:49 am)

    Wrong.
    The Bolt battery is huge.
    I still disagree that it ought to be done on Volt.
    Invalid sensor performance codes will set, and, you are also changing the value at the opposite end of sensor parameters.
    This can affect complex software decisions in many other ways, especially in hot weather and skew charging cooling set points.

    Other compounded fault code setting thresholds will be more easily crossed, so, overall, the troubles being caused aren’t worth the small, relatively few ounces of gas saved per year.

    In addition, each physical connection in itself is rarely achievable as factory precise with, sorry to say, typical DIY installation methods.

    Even techs with decades of “experience”, do lousy ” work” in this regard more often than not.
    Who, then are persuaded by tool truck reprogrammer vendors that ” they need a $3,000 to $8,000 reprogrammer”.
    They all find out about a year later that they were oversold. The highly honest ones admit it to us later.
    Then they get a new Genisys EVO from us (@$1600) when their “update” for three years costs $2,000, which isn’t wise to install onto a three year old motherboard.

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  12. 12
    George S. Bower

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (10:12 am)

    “I tell everyone that the most valuable, useful car of my life was the Prius that I drove for 10 years.

    Agreed. Ours has 104,000 miles and we bot it new in ’08.

    We have a Tesla but there is no other EV choice that’s good for road trips.

    agreed. The super charger network is an amazing thing. Indispensible and something you will not have with the Bolt.

    The Bolt will need some personal testing by [his wife] Janet and myself to find out how it is on road trips.

    If the Bolt is unacceptable on a long trip than it can NOT be considered your MAIN car. It can only be called your main “in town car”. Therefore your statement is misleading and not correct

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  13. 13
    George S. Bower

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (10:21 am)

    I will grant one advantage the Bolt EV has over the Bolt: a more up right seating position….and ,if you live in town it will be better in town. It won’t be a target like any expensive car is.

    However, I don’t live in town. Most of my miles are long haul miles. The Model S is now our main “go to ” car. It has even replaced the Prius.

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  14. 14
    George S. Bower

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (10:22 am)

    Oh wait, one more advantage of the Bolt over the Tesla:

    It will probably be more reliable:)

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  15. 15
    bro1999

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (10:24 am)

    George S. Bower:

    If the Bolt is unacceptable on a long trip than it can NOT be considered your MAIN car. It can only be called your main “in town car”. Therefore your statement is misleading and not correct

    Who’s to decide what an individual person’s criteria is for their “main car” except that individual? If The Woz says his Bolt will be his main car, then the Bolt is his main car. He doesn’t need his definition of “main car” to conform to other people’s definition of what a “main car” should be.

    And he didn’t even say the Bolt could not handle HIS long trips…merely that he needs to investigate further. It could very well end up that HIS Bolt will be able to cater to HIS long distance road trip needs.

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    MnVikes

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (10:28 am)

    If the Bolt is unacceptable on a long trip than it can NOT be considered your MAIN car. It can only be called your main “in town car”. Therefore your statement is misleading and not correct

    Wrong,
    For 95% of the Population who may drive over 200 miles less than 10 days a year, the Bolt would their “Main” car. Their “Long Haul” car would be their second car.

    I do get that you drive ALOT of long haul and the SC makes the Tesla perfect for your Main car but that is not the majority of drivers.

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  17. 17
    Lee

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (10:29 am)

    Wozniak-bite the bullet? Isn’t that a ochse moron? Good luck and enjoy the car Woz!

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  18. 18
    Dave

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (10:31 am)

    George S. Bower:

    If the Bolt is unacceptable on a long trip than it can NOT be considered your MAIN car. It can only be called your main “in town car”. Therefore your statement is misleading and not correct

    I don’t agree. Unless long road trips are a frequent part of your life, the Bolt could be your “main” car, even if you have to take a different car occasionally.

    It’s like saying the Volt I drive daily isn’t my “main” car because I occasionally have to drive my SUV when I want to pull a trailer. I guess a car that can’t do everything can’t be your “main” car.

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  19. 19
    George Stuart Bower

     

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (10:42 am)

    bro1999: Who’s to decide what an individual person’s criteria is for their “main car” except that individual? If The Woz says his Bolt will be his main car, then the Bolt is his main car. He doesn’t need his definition of “main car” to conform to other people’s definition of what a “main car” should be.

    And he didn’t even say the Bolt could not handle HIS long trips…merely that he needs to investigate further. It could very well end up that HIS Bolt will be able to cater to HIS long distance road trips.

    I still say his statement is mis leading. He should have qualified it as his main in town car.

    I think we should have a race. We will drive from one coast to the other. You in the bolt and me in my 2012 model s.

    Who knows you might win if the Tesla breaks:)

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  20. 20
    bro1999

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (10:51 am)

    George Stuart Bower: I still say his statement is mis leading. He should have qualified it as his main in town car.

    I think we should have a race. We will drive from one coast to the other. You in the bolt and me in my 2012 model s.

    Who knows you might win if the Tesla breaks:)

    Well, he wasn’t talking about people in general. He was talking about himself and his needs, so he doesn’t need to qualify his statement.

    If you had a Model X, I would definitely take that bet. Odds are your FWD would get stuck open or something. Lol

    Model S you would probably beat me, as they are more reliable than an X.

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  21. 21
    Kdawg

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (11:07 am)

    bro1999: Who’s to decide what an individual person’s criteria is for their “main car”

    My personal criteria is “time butt is planted in seat of car”. So, in a year, if your daily driving time totals more than long trips in another car, your daily driver is your “main” car.

    However in my case, I only own 1 car, so it will always be my main car, LOL.

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    KNS

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (11:27 am)

    Considering how rarely I drive more than 200 miles and where I go on those trips, I am beginning to think about replacing my 2015 Volt with a BoltEV and a really really big Voltec — one that I don’t have to drive, maintain or garage and that travels on rails.

    KNS

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    Reatta Guy

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (11:39 am)

    Saw my first Bolt last night, in a parking lot in San Ramon CA. Looks bigger than I expected (because of the height – although most cars are taller than a Reatta – when you look for a Reatta in a big parking lot you look for the hole). But overall just looked very impressive. I didn’t check out the design details that the designers care about like the squiggly rear lights, but it looked distinctive and useful. Beats the pants of the current Prius which is only distinctive because it is ugly and no longer looks functional like the earlier models.

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    Jim I

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (11:58 am)

    My personal definition of a Main Car is that it should be able to go from Boca Raton to Key Largo so we can go scuba diving and then make it back home.

    Or we could go from Boca Raton to Key West, do a single charge and then drive home.

    Bolt works for us!

    The lease on the FL Ford C-Max Energi is up this November. I wonder what the 2018 Bolt will have to offer.

    :-)

    Jim – C-5277

    Your personal definition of a Main Car may vary…..

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    Streetlight

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (12:11 pm)

    Reatta Guy: But overall just looked very impressive.

    One local (SF-SJ) newscast featured Chevy’s ‘Drive a BOLT’ at the auto show (SF-SJ) With a series of interviews. One being a SV Chevy dealer. His dealership delivered 24 BOLTS, had back-orders for another 125; but getting only another 35-40 BOLTS over the next month. I’d say BOLT’s future looks very bright.

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  26. 26
    Mark Z

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (1:36 pm)

    Woz also enjoys his Segway. Everyone should use the technology that fits their needs and desires. After my Bolt test drive, I understand why anyone would consider this reasonable priced long range electric vehicle a practical choice for the majority of daily driving.

    My first vehicle was a VW Beetle. One favorite was the 1970 El Camino. I never minded driving larger vehicles and the 1994 Eldorado was ideal. Model S is similar. I don’t mind parking in empty parking lot areas and walking to save the vehicles from door ding damage. If walking distance becomes an issue someday, shifting to a Bolt sized EV would be an excellent choice to park close and walk less.

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    Kdawg

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (1:58 pm)

    Mark Z: Woz also enjoys his Segway.

    And he is a Segway Polo enthusiast.

    https://youtu.be/uzGWSudVdFA

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    Kdawg

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (2:16 pm)

    Mark Z: If walking distance becomes an issue someday, shifting to a Bolt sized EV would be an excellent choice to park close and walk less.

    Or you can buy a Faraday Future, which will drop you off then go park itself. 😀

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  29. 29
    Dave G

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (2:23 pm)

    Steverino: The Bolt EV has no ICE of course, further proof that one is not needed for battery longevity, no?

    The Bolt and Volt have completely different strategies for battery longevity.

    With 238 EPA miles EV range, the Bolt’s battery will have very few full discharge cycles. This is similar to Tesla’s longevity strategy. If you make the battery 5 times the size you need, longevity essentially becomes a non-issue.

    With 53 EPA miles EV range and a range extender, the Volt will have a lot of full discharge cycles. GM engineers counter this by using a different chemistry with better longevity, and by never allowing it to fully charge or discharge, and by making sure it never gets too cold. In addition to ERDTT, I believe the Volt also has an electric heater in the battery pack. If you pre-condition the Volt on cold days, they may warm the pack using wall power.

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    Dave G

     

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (2:29 pm)

    George S. Bower: If the Bolt is unacceptable on a long trip than it can NOT be considered your MAIN car.

    Have to disagree with you there.

    For many families, a pure BEV like the Bolt may be the best solution for their main daily driver. It sounds like Steve Wozniak and his wife are such a family.

    I’ll never buy a pure BEV. It doesn’t suit our lifestyle. But for others, the combination of a pure BEV with enough range + another car for longer trips makes a lot of sense.

    In any case, I truly believe a nationwide network of fast chargers is the wrong answer.

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    Kdawg

     

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (4:28 pm)

    Kdawg: Or you can buy a Faraday Future, which will drop you off then go park itself.

    Here’s a video of this happening from inside the car w/a ride along.

    https://www.facebook.com/thedrive/videos/1232717953474431/

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    stuart22

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (4:42 pm)

    George, very few live far from population centers like I think you do. Where you live, how you drive, the Model S is understandably a great EV choice. But where I and many of us live, the Bolt is arguably the better choice. For metropolitan duty, it is far superior to your heavy, oversized Model S when it comes to whisking through open spots in thick traffic, for parking, for tight manuverability. While being as roomy and comfortable inside for four people as the Model S is.

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  33. 33
    don shaw

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (4:51 pm)

    George S. Bower,

    Hello George,

    Having had 3 Volts, and never having made a round trip over 100 miles, (the longest trip being to Newark airport), a Bolt will be the ‘main’ car when we can get one, even if we had a Tesla We could not use a tesla on the long trip to our son’s, and we fly or take the train even though the Volt could do it.

    ‘Time of butt in the seat’ from kdawg is a good definition. For some, their long road trip may be satisfied with Bolt comparable chargers. The Bolt could become most people’s main car..

    Hate to disagree with you – your articles are so excellent

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  34. 34
    George S. Bower

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (6:45 pm)

    don shaw:
    George S. Bower,

    Hello George,

    Having had 3 Volts, and never having made a round trip over 100 miles, (the longest trip being to Newark airport), a Bolt will be the ‘main’ car when we can get one,even if we had a TeslaWe could not use a tesla on the long trip to our son’s, and we fly or take the train even though the Volt could do it.

    ‘Time of butt in the seat’ from kdawg is a good definition.For some, their long road trip may be satisfied with Bolt comparable chargers.The Bolt could become most people’s main car..

    Hate to disagree with you – your articles are so excellent

    Thanks don,
    I’m a GM fan and you all know it. I just like to argue. I learned it from kdawg….but he’s better at it.

    bah ha ha as DonC would say:)

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  35. 35
    Steverino

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (7:32 pm)

    Dan Petit/Petit Technical College:
    Wrong.
    The Bolt battery is huge.
    I still disagree that it ought to be done on Volt.
    Invalid sensor performance codes will set, and, you are also changing the value at the opposite end of sensor parameters.
    This can affect complex software decisions in many other ways, especially in hot weather and skew charging cooling set points.

    Other compounded fault code setting thresholds will be more easily crossed, so, overall, the troubles being caused aren’t worth the small, relatively few ounces of gas saved per year.

    In addition, eachphysical connection in itself is rarely achievable as factory precise with, sorry to say, typical DIY installation methods.

    Maybe you are thinking it’s a modification to the car’s software? It’s not.

    The ERDTT defeat is an off the shelf air sensor that plugs into the wiring harness in place of the original. It has a resistor that creates a higher air temp reading. It’s been in use for about 5 years now on many cars without triggering the fault codes you are suggesting. Again, the car just thinks it’s 38°F outside rather than say, 14°F. All it does is stop the car from initiating the ICE to create waste heat for the cabin.

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    Mark Z

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    Jan 6th, 2017 (8:53 pm)

    Kdawg: Or you can buy a Faraday Future, which will drop you off then go park itself. 😀

    I expect Tesla to self park long before FF sells their vehicle to the consumer. Hopefully all the companies will offer a safe park option to park far from the areas of high activity.

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    Kdawg

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    Jan 7th, 2017 (1:05 am)

    George S. Bower: I just like to argue. I learned it from kdawg….but he’s better at it.

    Beer helps. Never post anything 100% sober. :)

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    Kdawg

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    Jan 7th, 2017 (1:05 am)

    Mark Z: I expect Tesla to self park long before FF sells their vehicle to the consumer.

    Yes, it was a tongue-in-cheek post.

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    Dan Petit/Petit Technical College

     

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    Jan 7th, 2017 (9:47 am)

    Steverino,
    While that front page post is gone, what I am referring to was :

    1. The looseness of the statement where the wrong impression was left, in that “a 47 ohm resistor could be installed”, and;

    2. Where that PID shows up in other sub processors, that sensor ****is in fact*** utilized by those other sub processors. And;

    3. There should be no assumption that all temperature conditions for all subprocessor functions would still be within tolerances for service longevities of all systems.

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    Dan Petit/Petit Technical College

     

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    Jan 7th, 2017 (2:12 pm)

    Please allow me to explain this insistence on specificity.

    Any advice given here has tremendous responsibilities attatched to every single statement each of us makes.

    New owners asking questions regarding modifications require hightened due dilligence because they almost always don’t have necessary working experience.

    Working experience is always “a full time work in progress”, but even in the very best shops, highly experienced L-1 and L-3 (especially!!!) techs still have very detailed and specific procedures for everything they do because they must be responsible for your entire vehicle every moment it is in the shop.

    While the current and increasing trend of “sharing” information itself is in every pocket, what doesn’t confer with that is the hard-won experience of repairing small, big, and sometimes hugely-costly mistakes.
    With that said, while we may wish helpfulness by “sharing” information in this extremely powerful way, society has no way of applying responsibility for when damages occur when technically-obscure suggestions cause loss. (Could someone just go to an electronics store to buy a 47 ohm resistor to “try that”?)

    While GM is the VERY BEST at failsafes, still, these systems are far too new to infer the same general outcomes compared to the 110 year failsafe design heritage of internal combustion.

    This is also where, as we see it, an insistence on a 100 year design heritage of blood and sweat excludes Google for autonomous systems, for instance, which has them not just a little rankled.

    They need constantly to have their toes held to the fire on that.

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    Dan Petit/Petit Technical College

     

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    Jan 8th, 2017 (8:40 am)

    Regarding APP stored datum for unintended accelerations, for inclusional or exclusional investigative logic, if APP went directly from zero percent to 100%, then primary importance would be vehicular faulting.
    Where datum indicates any progression of percentages between zero and 100%, then operator error would be of primary investigative importance, when all possible analog tests exclude analog faulting.

    Analog analytics must be performed firstly, and as soon as possible after the incident for the most distinctive values.

    Overall, the automotive industry does not have a strictly open minded attitude towards new proven methodologies.

    Some may think our relentless drive for safety constitutes immaterial-paranoia. We respectfully disagree.

    Perhaps that may somehow change for the better this year.

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    Mark Z

     

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    Jan 8th, 2017 (3:37 pm)

    OT: If you want 3D in a high end 4K TV, buy now. Sony and LG for 2017 have dropped the 3D capability.

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    Eco_Turbo

     

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    Jan 8th, 2017 (8:39 pm)

    I wonder if Woz had to pay any difference, old Teslas are worth a significant amount of money, greater than $30,000 is not beyond reason.

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    Upnorth QC

     

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    Jan 8th, 2017 (11:32 pm)

    ERDTT is only to heat the cabin and keep over 20 miles range in the coldest conditions.There is no problem running in cold conditions or in hot condition because the battery is protected with sensors inside the pack.When the battery is too cold, the ICE starts even if the thermistor is modified.Adding a 47,000 ohms resistance to the thermistor had no influence on the performance of my 2012 Volt.It’s been five winters now and my battery has the same capacity as other one’s who did not do the mod.As others, it loose 3% capacity after 3 years and nothing more since.The Volt has the same kind of cells as the Spark EV and in Quebec,there is at least 3 small delivery fleet of Spark EV operating several times a year at minus 30° F.

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