Jan 03

2013 plug-in sales top-three: Volt narrowly wins, Nissan and Tesla looking strong

 

Just got this news in and figured for a Friday it was worth bumping the C-Max story.

The Volt did do relatively well in December, as did others in the traditionally strong month.

Overall things are positive, but in the “race,” things are still up in the air.

Nissan is exuberant because last year was poor. Chevrolet is hanging on compared to last year.

You can slice and dice the info a number of ways.

 

The Chevrolet Volt, while slightly down in sales compared to 2012, narrowly finished 2013 as the best-selling plug-in electrified car with 23,094 units delivered compared to the Nissan Leaf’s 22,610 units, but this year was otherwise Nissan and Tesla’s year to shine.

Numbers for Tesla are estimated as it declines to report monthly sales as per standard automaker practice, but it likely sold in the middle-upper 18,000 unit range for the year. As of November, it had delivered an estimated 16,950, and it did not likely deliver more than 2,000 this month given Tesla’s overseas focus at the moment.

Even if Tesla well-exceeded this estimate, it would need over 5,660 sales in December to place it second among plug-in electrified cars, so we are confident saying it’s third place overall. The next-highest seller, the Toyota Prius PHEV, is much further behind with 11,169 as of November.

Meanwhile, Nissan proudly announced its official numbers are in.

2013_Leaf

On the third-year anniversary month of the Nissan Leaf’s launch, the automaker reported its best-ever sales of 2,529 units.

Launched at the end of December 2010 with just 19 units sold that month, last month’s 2,529 units also exceeds November 2013’s 1,920 units sold, and it beats its previous best month in September 2013 when Nissan sold 2,420 Leafs.

All this year the now-U.S.-assembled and price-reduced Leaf has significantly surpassed correlated months from last year, and December 2013’s record beat December 2012 by 70 percent.

By contrast, the also price-reduced, and since-its-inception-U.S.-made Chevrolet Volt’s 2,392 units was down 9.2 percent from 2,633 in December 2012.

The Volt’s calendar year sales for all of 2013 at 23,094 units compares to 23,461 in 2012, representing a 1.6 percent decline.

The Leaf’s Total 2013 calendar year sales are 22,610, more than doubling last year’s 9,819 sold for all of 2012.

Model_S

So while the Volt is the top-selling plug-in car for 2013 it’s doing so on the relative way down, or just going sideways, whereas positive growth is far more remarkable for Tesla and Nissan – a point Nissan commented upon.

“The 2013 model launched in March accelerated sales and drove 10 straight months of record sales. In 2013 we crossed the 40,000 sales threshold, saw a LEAF driver’s odometer hit the 100,000 mile mark, and now have a new best-ever sales month in December,” said Erik Gottfried, Nissan’s director of EV sales and marketing. “As we gear up to roll out the 2014 Leaf, we look forward to continued growth in new-wave markets and deeper penetration on the west coast strongholds as the ever-growing Leaf owner base continues to evangelize the product to friends and neighbors.”

Nissan says Atlanta remains its number-one market for the fifth straight month, “and sales are expanding deeper into Georgia markets such as Macon and Columbus.”

The Leaf is also noted as the top-selling Nissan model in Atlanta, Seattle and San Francisco, as well as ranking within the top-three Nissan models in Honolulu and Portland.

Onward and Upward

What all this will mean for GM’s product plans is unknown.

According to GM’s Kevin Kelly, manager, Electric Vehicle and Hybrid Communications, “Gen 2 is well underway,” he said today, but he could offer no timeframe for this.

Meanwhile positive word continues to get out for the Volt which is also the top-selling plug-in period, with 54,552 U.S. sales since launch, exceeding the Leaf’s 42,122 and Model S’ over 20,000 since its June 2012 launch.

The Volt’s lower price and total cost of ownership are strong, but sales have been affected also by curtailed production, not to mention inexpensive gas of late, according to automotive analyst Alan Baum.

In any event, 2014 is a new year, and GM will continue onward – not without competition, but still in the strongest place of all.

This entry was posted on Friday, January 3rd, 2014 at 11:31 am and is filed under General. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

COMMENTS: 54


  1. 1
    Mark

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (11:37 am)

    Awesome! Slow and steady wins the EV race!


  2. 2
    ziv

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (11:45 am)

    You can’t sell what you don’t have and Volt inventory has dropped hard and sales have tapered. I do notice Nissan is working three shifts to build up the Leaf inventory. No surprise that they are growing their sales while the Volt is standing still.


  3. 3
    MrEnergyCzar

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (11:47 am)

    These Volt numbers are a good reason to push for the Gen 2.0 Volt to come out in the Fall of 2015 as a MY 2016. I can’t see them waiting another year after that to release it. The plug-in race is on….

    MrEnergyCzar


  4. 4
    Jim Seko

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (12:13 pm)

    I have leased both a 2012 Leaf and a 2013 Volt. The Volt is a much better car than the Leaf without even considering the range extending gasoline engine. The heater in the Volt (when in electric mode) is better than the Leaf and when the gasoline engine is running the heat is intense. The Volt is quieter in electric mode. The Leaf has a high pitch whine. Turning on remote heating in the Volt is as simple as hitting a button on the key fob. Remote heating of the Leaf requires a smart phone and internet connection. The Volt has an easy to use alarm for preventing theft of the charging station. The alarm goes off after ten seconds. If the charging station of the Leaf is removed you will get a text on your smart phone after about two minutes which is plenty of time for thieves to get away. The Volt has better acceleration, better handling, a five-star crash rating, a better engineered battery cooling system. Everything about the Volt is of higher quality than the Leaf.

    I can think of only one reason why the Volt is not selling well: anti-American prejudice is especially high among American environmentalists. A good example of this prejudice is the fact that anybody, at all, took seriously the conspiracy theory film, “Who Killed the Electric Car?”


  5. 5
    `Noel Park

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (12:26 pm)

    Jim Seko: anti-American prejudice is especially high among American environmentalists.

    #5

    Well I consider myself to be an environmentalist and I wouldn’t consider buying an “import”. I think that “anti-American prejudice” is high among people who are too dumb to understand their own enlightened self interest.

    +1 for your comment overall. I was right there with you until the very end, LOL.


  6. 6
    `Noel Park

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (12:29 pm)

    Mark:
    Awesome! Slow and steady wins the EVrace!

    #1

    That pretty much says it all. +1


  7. 7
    Thomas j. Thias ~ Selling Volts at Sundance

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    Thomas j. Thias ~ Selling Volts at Sundance
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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (12:30 pm)

    The link below should answer ALL your questions. Last updated in October; add additional Volt EREV’s sold through December 2013 to these totals.

    Pushing 70,000 Chevy Volt EREV’s sold since December, 2010 with most occurring after November, 2011 as Volt sales came off Beta status, just 26 months ago!

    The 70,000 figure is the one that outgoing GM CEO Dan Ackerson used in his address to the National Press Club a couple of weeks ago.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevy_volt

    Best-

    Thomas j. Thias

    Sundance Chevrolet Inc.

    517-622-6081

    Twitter.com/AmazingChevVolt


  8. 8
    Jim Seko

     

    Jim Seko
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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (12:42 pm)

    `Noel Park: #5

    Well I consider myself to be an environmentalist and I wouldn’t consider buying an “import”.I think that “anti-American prejudice” is high among people who are too dumb to understand their own enlightened self interest.

    +1 for your comment overall.I was right there with you until the very end, LOL.

    I know I sound like an angry resentful person but IT IS TRUE that many people took seriously the film, “Who Killed the Electric Car?” Anyone who took that film seriously knows nothing about the technical details of electric cars. The anti-American bias in that film is obvious. Every manufacturer, domestic and imported, was against the California EV mandate but GM was made out to be the most evil of them all. Everything in that film was complete BS.


  9. 9
    `Noel Park

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (12:46 pm)

    Jim Seko: I know I sound like an angry resentful person but IT IS TRUE that many people took seriously the film, “Who Killed the Electric Car?

    #10

    What’s that got to do with it? I never even saw it.


  10. 10
    `Noel Park

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (12:54 pm)

    Thomas j. Thias ~ Selling Volts at Sundance: Pushing 70,000 Chevy Volt EREV’s sold since December, 2010 with most occurring after November, 2011 as Volt sales came off Beta status, just 26 months ago!

    #9

    Very good! +1

    Somebody on the forum mentioned that the Volt sells more units that the 3 Escalade models combined. And more than the Corvette. And GM keeps producing them, LOL. A lot of people claim that GM doesn’t make any money on the Volt, but GM hasn’t been sharing those numbers with me. 22K units at say $35K each is $770 MILLION. Sounds like a fair chunk of change to me. Lots of niche players sell less cars than the Volt, and they just keep chugging along.

    It’s all good. Go Volt! Go GM!


  11. 11
    Martin

     

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (12:57 pm)

    All major auto companies must build on Volt platformi.e generator 800 cc if possible and electric motor and battery like Tesla with 200 mile rangeor 350 k.m..Then this car will be the car of common man. Price should be in current range also.


  12. 12
    Mark Z

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (1:10 pm)

    If the volume of battery kW sold each month was the standard of measurement, Tesla Model S would be number one!

    I wonder how many of these BEVs were sold? It was a sellout!

    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Hello-Kitty-Coupe-6-Volt-Battery-Powered-Ride-On/21692548


  13. 13
    Jackson

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (1:22 pm)

    “Nissan says Atlanta remains its number-one market for the fifth straight month”

    Told ya. A new, white LEAF went down my residential street the last week of December. In a wide arc from Marietta to Alpharetta, North of I-285, there is a real hot spot for the car. Admittedly, I don’t often travel outside this area, but after traveling beyond I can tell when I’ve returned when I spot the first of four or so LEAFs I’ll see on my way home.

    I know there are those here who disagree, but Spark EVs need to spread beyond the Left Coast quickly. The car has already been engineered, built and actually fielded; there is no need to wait for a “better” model which might take three years to roll out. The Spark is small and sporty, and conceivably could be cheap enough in quantity to be an entry-level ‘pony car’ EV; for which the more spartan accommodations are acceptable. Those later, “better” models will surely cost more.

    The Spark can make inroads into hot markets, where Nissan is rapidly becoming synonymous with EV technology, this year. GM shouldn’t wait.

    “So while the Volt is the top-selling plug-in car for 2013 it’s doing so on the relative way down, or just going sideways, whereas positive growth is far more remarkable for Tesla and Nissan”

    Just imagine what could happen with a meaningful, competent advertising strategy.


  14. 14
    volt11

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (1:25 pm)

    My view is that the Leaf is well positioned to ride on the Tesla’s coattails. Tesla is the darling, aspirational tech car right now. And most people can’t afford it, but they can afford a Leaf, which is arguably the next best EV on the nationwide market. GM has virtually nothing in that space right now. The Spark EV would be almost there, except for the fact that it’s further downmarket and is only sold in 2 states. And I also agree with Jim Seko that pro-import sentiment (other than with Tesla) rules in the targeted demographic.

    So in summary: “couldn’t afford Tesla S, bought Leaf.”


  15. 15
    `Noel Park

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (1:26 pm)

    Jackson: I know there are those here who disagree, but Spark EVs need to spread beyond the Left Coast. The car has already been designed and actually fielded; there is no need to wait for a “better” model which might take three years to roll out. It is small and sporty, and conceivably could be cheap enough in quantity to be an entry-level ‘pony car’ EV. It can make inroads into a markets where Nissan is rapidly becoming synonymous with EV technology. GM shouldn’t wait.

    #13

    Makes sense to me. +1


  16. 16
    Streetlight

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (1:38 pm)

    I know there are those here who disagree, but Spark EVs need to spread beyond the Left Coast.The car has already been designed and actually fielded; there is no need to wait for a “better” model which might take three years to roll out.It is small and sporty, and conceivably could be cheap enough in quantity to be an entry-level ‘pony car’ EV.It can make inroads into a markets where Nissan is rapidly becoming synonymous with EV technology.GM shouldn’t wait.
    Just imagine what could happen with a meaningful advertising campaign.

    Agree. SPARK EV’s reviews have been superb. GM could do more to distinguish the two SPARK versions. Not unlike the ’80′s-90′s confusion between BLAZER and its curiously inconsistent JIMMY lines. GM for whatever reason hasn’t tried to identify its EV lines. After three years VOLT, witness some of the media, is still not fully understood. GM has to be concerned about ELR falling into the same hole its put SPARK EV. This goes beyond brand.

    Its now on Mary’s watch to fix this. She knows her beans.


  17. 17
    Jackson

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (1:46 pm)

    Streetlight: After three years VOLT, witness some of the media, is still not fully understood

    People won’t reach for superior engineering if they can’t understand it’s value. Explaining the Volt’s value has been difficult even for those of us who own them: For good or ill, a straight-forward BEV is more easily understood. With the EV as an understood quantity, Volt would then become “EV plus;” a concept easier to put across. I believe GM will gain ‘cred’ by being involved in both areas, and they should make that happen sooner rather than later.


  18. 18
    sharkvolt

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (2:06 pm)

    The Volt is easy to explain.

    It is a “dual fuel” vehicle.

    It can run fully on electricity for the best economy.

    It can run on gasoline for longer trips.

    It does this with no compromises in performance in either mode.


  19. 19
    Jackson

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (2:23 pm)

    sharkvolt: The Volt is easy to explain.

    It is a “dual fuel” vehicle.

    You mean like the Chevy E-85 vehicles? You run the risk of muddying the water in an advertising campaign (where you punch a simple idea to death); especially since so many have been convinced that GM has the cultural equivalent of BO (as a victim of the politically motivated).

    Yeah, your approach could work pretty well face-to-face, no argument.


  20. 20
    Loboc

     

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (2:49 pm)

    sharkvolt:
    The Volt is easy to explain.

    It is a “dual fuel” vehicle.

    It can run fully on electricity for the best economy.

    It can run on gasoline for longer trips.

    It does this with no compromises in performance in either mode.

    It ain’t all that easy.

    It’s a parallel hybrid at highway speeds, but only after AER.
    It’s serial hybrid at street speeds. Mostly. But after AER.
    It’s an EV all the time. Except when AER is depleted. But the main drive is ‘always’ electric. Unless it’s running the gas engine due to low outside temp.
    Allof which can be modified by user-selectable HM and MM. Sheesh!

    All the ‘but’ ‘except’ ‘mostly’ makes it extremely difficult to classify and sell. Most dealers on the Internet just give up and quote 40mpg without mentioning the electric drive.


  21. 21
    Jackson

     

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (3:10 pm)

    More interesting hybrid news from Atlanta:

    Are we ready for Triple Fuel?

    “Ford connects with Georgia Tech to drive solar-powered car”

    142hk00.jpg

    http://www.11alive.com/news/article/317813/40/Ford-connects-with-Georgia-Tech-to-drive-solar-powered-car

    I’d have sent this to you, Jeff; but it would sit over the weekend, and it’s less than 24 hours old.


  22. 22
    Streetlight

     

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (3:22 pm)

    Jackson: People won’t reach for superior engineering if they can’t understand it’s value. Explaining the Volt’s value has been difficult even for those of us who own them:

    Proven superior engineering. The problem is manifold. A public confused by mixed media. A gun-shy GM still licking wounds taking a major PR hit following its stupefying public crushing of its entire GM EV fleet. (Save for maybe a couple dozen) Is it any wonder that’s fed a media circus…the movie, the conspiracy cult… Now that GM EV was marketed (by leasing only) under the GM brand.

    Intriguing thought is this — using the SAE DC COMBO charge as standard on all EV’s of any class to redefine EV’s (the 80%/20 min charge capability is inevitable) standard. Over a set apart brand. (That wouldn’t help ELR’s performance, but even so that soon to be retired N.A. 1.4 could be super tuned.)


  23. 23
    `Noel Park

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (3:27 pm)

    Jackson: “Ford connects with Georgia Tech to drive solar-powered car”

    #21

    This got chewed over pretty well on the forum yesterday, and a lot of people were pretty “from Missouri” as to how much charge could actually result depending on where one lived, weather, time of year, and many other factors.

    That said, I have always thought that something like this would be a cool option for the Volt. Cost is a big factor obviously, but I would have been really interested in it if it had been available.


  24. 24
    Dave - Phoenix

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (4:10 pm)

    sharkvolt:
    The Volt is easy to explain.

    It is a “dual fuel” vehicle.

    It can run fully on electricity for the best economy.

    It can run on gasoline for longer trips.

    It does this with no compromises in performance in either mode.

    Some folks have been saying….

    Electric vehicle in town… A hybrid on long road trips…


  25. 25
    Dave - Phoenix

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (4:15 pm)

    Considering that Tesla Model S replaced the Volt as the new hot vehicle for the wealthy celebrity, Nissan lowered its price to $26K, Prius plugin and Ford C-max Energi added new PHEV competition, GM did pretty well by still selling the same number of Volts in 2013 as it did in 2012.

    What is a bigger headline is that total plugin sales more than doubled from 2012 to 2013, and will probably do so again in 2014 as more models are released and prices continue to fall….


  26. 26
    koz

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (4:22 pm)

    Loboc: It ain’t all that easy.

    It’s a parallel hybrid at highway speeds, but only after AER.
    It’sserial hybrid at street speeds. Mostly. But after AER.
    It’s an EV all the time. Except when AER is depleted. But the main drive is ‘always’ electric. Unless it’s running the gas engine due to low outside temp.
    Allof which can be modified by user-selectable HM and MM. Sheesh!

    All the ‘but’ ‘except’ ‘mostly’ makes it extremely difficult to classify and sell. Most dealers on the Internet just give up and quote 40mpg without mentioning the electric drive.

    It’s not hard to explain but is hard for much of the public to understand, IMO. I think most of the difficulty lies in preconceived notions of what a hybrid is and what an EV is. Everybody wants to put it in one box or the other and they just have difficulty grasping an entirely new concept.

    I say it is a fully capable EV for the for 40ish miles and then a Prius-like hybrid getting 40ish mpg after that for a total range of about 350 miles. Then I have to reassure them that the transition to hybrid mode is automatic.

    In my company of 35 people, 2 others have gotten Volts. Neither of them were EV oriented or tech crazy. It just makes good sense for their driving patterns and they are very happy with them. They are the prototypical customer GM and its dealers should be going after if they really want to sell the Volt. They want something a little nicer than the everyday cars, hatch back is convenient for work, fuel saving is a big plus, and driving is a welcomed pleasant surprise.

    At its current price with Fed tax credit, I feel the Volt is a very viable product and should be selling at @50,000 units in the US/Canada markets. Even though December sales were down from 2012, I’m very encouraged by the 2392 sales. With the pathetic inventory carried in the month of December, this is a lot of sales. If inventory can be brought back up to the more industry norm of 60-90 days (5000-7000), I think Volt sales will move back over 3000/mo with little more effort from GM. With a little effort they could get to the 40,000-50,000 range.


  27. 27
    ATLJohnny

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (4:49 pm)

    I live in Alpharetta, GA, right in the middle of the N. Atlanta arc Jackson is talking about.

    Jackson is correct, there are a ton of Leafs up here. GA gives a $5k rebate on them [and nothing on the Volt], so, if you lease one, after fuel, you’re basically driving for free, and lots of folks find that irresistibly appealing.

    Anyway, if GA gave $5k to Volt buyers my guess is that you’d see a significant change in the numbers.

    All this said, I think GM is fighting an almost insurmountable battle with Asian-born folks who grew up on Japanese cars and are simply dismissive of US models due to their crappy reputation historically. Heck, my all-American-born neighbor only buys Hondas. Not sure how GM is going dig themselves out of that one.


  28. 28
    `Noel Park

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (6:40 pm)

    Dave – Phoenix: What is a bigger headline is that total plugin sales more than doubled from 2012 to 2013, and will probably do so again in 2014 as more models are released and prices continue to fall….

    #25

    Glass half full. +1


  29. 29
    Nelson

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (7:20 pm)

    In 2011 there were three (Volt, Leaf, T-Roadster)
    In 2014 there are 17 with more to come.
    (BMW i3, Cadillac ELR, Chevrolet Spark EV, Chevrolet Volt, Fiat 500e, Ford C-Max Energi, Ford Fusion Energi, Ford Focus EV, Honda Accord PHEV, Honda Fit EV, Mitsubishi i-MiEV, Nissan Leaf, Porsche Panamera PHEV, Smart ED, Tesla Model S, Toyota Prius Plug-In, Toyota RAV4 EV)

    Soon no excuse will remain.

    NPNS! (No-Plug, No-Sale)
    Volt#671


  30. 30
    `Noel Park

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (8:07 pm)

    Nelson:
    In 2011 there were three (Volt, Leaf, T-Roadster)
    In 2014 there are 17 with more to come.
    (BMW i3, Cadillac ELR, Chevrolet Spark EV, Chevrolet Volt, Fiat 500e, Ford C-Max Energi, Ford Fusion Energi, Ford Focus EV, Honda Accord PHEV, Honda Fit EV, Mitsubishi i-MiEV, Nissan Leaf, Porsche Panamera PHEV, Smart ED, Tesla Model S, Toyota Prius Plug-In, Toyota RAV4 EV)

    Soon no excuse will remain.

    NPNS!(No-Plug, No-Sale)
    Volt#671

    #29

    Advantage – California Air Resources Board (CARB). +1


  31. 31
    Bob Goldschmidt

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    Jan 3rd, 2014 (11:23 pm)

    Jim Seko,

    Don’t think environmentalists are a big factor in holding down sales. Rather conservatives and libertarians who were fundamentally against the bail out of GM and would like to prove that the government can’t do anything right. They seem to forget that both the Japanese and South Korean auto industries were created with massive government subsidies and rampant protectionism.


  32. 32
    xiaowei1

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    Jan 4th, 2014 (6:31 am)

    Bob Goldschmidt: Don’t think environmentalists are a big factor in holding down sales. Rather conservatives and libertarians who were fundamentally against the bail out of GM and would like to prove that the government can’t do anything right. They seem to forget that both the Japanese and South Korean auto industries were created with massive government subsidies and rampant protectionism.

    Agreed. it was clearly political and the bail out was a major factor – every forum at the time was calling GM “government motors”. the main stream media came down very hard on the Volt for no discernable reason but to sound controversial, whilst it was receiving awards all around the world (including in the US). Eric Bolling from Fox Business segments, misrepresented the Volt at every turn making it harder for people to know what the Volt was actually doing.

    if reporters actually looked at the car and what it did and what it could do for the US in terms of oil addiction, sales would be much better. people who don’t read car magazines were stuck with Fox and all the negative rhetoric about the bail out. then you had all the misinformation from people who only wanted to hear the sound of an ICE… it all made for a bad mix and a slow start.

    On a much more positive note, as more sales happen, more happy drivers will correct this misconception. We now have 70,000 families will be helping spread how good the Volt really is, and thousands more how drive other electric cars doing the same thing. Even as far away as Australia, people do recognise my Volt and I do what I can to help sell the concept.


  33. 33
    Raymondjram

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    Jan 4th, 2014 (8:50 am)

    “All this year the now-U.S.-made and price-reduced Leaf has significantly surpassed correlated months from last year, and December 2013’s record beat December 2012 by 70 percent.”

    The Nissan is Japanese so it isn’t “U.S. made”. It is just assembled or put together by workers from parts manufactured elsewhere. It can be U.S. made if Ford buys Nissan. As proof, the Chevy Spark (both gas and EV) is U.S. made, even in South Korea, because the manufacturing and assembly are done by GM Korea, an American-owned company. Assembly location or parts origin doesn’t change vehicle origin.

    Raymond


  34. 34
    Raymondjram

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    Jan 4th, 2014 (8:59 am)

    Jackson: People won’t reach for superior engineering if they can’t understand it’s value.Explaining the Volt’s value has been difficult even for those of us who own them:For good or ill, a straight-forward BEV is more easily understood.With the EV as an understood quantity, Volt would then become “EV plus;” a concept easier to put across.I believe GM will gain ‘cred’ by being involved in both areas, and they should make that happen sooner rather than later.

    There is superior engineering in every smartphone, but every layperson, even present forum members, take it for granted, and even expect more. It is a marketing problem as smartphone manufacturers use the carriers to promote their features and sell the phone. You will not see any direct Samsung ads because they don’t sell directly to users. Apple does, and even have their own stores. Yet Samsung sells twice as many phones.

    If power companies promote EVs. then EVs (including plug-in hybrids) will sell more.

    Raymond


  35. 35
    Jeff Cobb

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    Jan 4th, 2014 (9:02 am)

    Raymondjram,

    Hi Raymond,

    You may be right by FTC rules. I corrected it to U.S. assembled. Am checking domestic content. Nissan is sourcing locally in cases, including motors, but I’m unsure what percentage.


  36. 36
    stuart22

    +2

     

    stuart22
     Says

     

    Jan 4th, 2014 (11:07 am)

    sharkvolt:
    The Volt is easy to explain.

    I agree. All one needs to say is ‘It’s getting 109mpg since I got it”.


  37. 37
    stuart22

    +3

     

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    Jan 4th, 2014 (11:25 am)

    All things considered, Volt sales results for 2013 were impressive.

    The Volt got slammed both from above (by Tesla) and below (by LEAF) yet still managed to come up with decent numbers.

    Nissan’s price slashing effectively cut into Volt sales, and it took several months of lackluster sales numbers before GM reacted with their own price cut, which seemed to stabilize the Volt’s monthly numbers at around the 2K level.

    And then there was Tesla, whose fabulous Model S pulled many upper crust prospects away from settling on a Volt. Although I suspect many of them would still consider a Volt as their second car, given its EV capability combined with unlimited range.

    2014 could bring some surprises: I predict the next gen Volt will be announced by GM in the second half of the year.


  38. 38
    stuart22

    +2

     

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    Jan 4th, 2014 (11:30 am)

    Some have expressed a fear that GM is losing interest in the Volt, and perhaps will even cancel it.

    Not a chance. I think the opposite is happening. Furthermore, I believe there is a link between the low inventory levels and the next gen Volt – could it be that GM is purposely manipulating inventories to levels that will ensure dealers won’t be saddled with Volts that, for lack of a better term, may be considered obsolete when the new Volt is announced?

    Volt sales have been at pretty steady levels for months without much marketing effort – a demonstration that the market is driving demand. Given this situation, I think GM realizes the value of not disrupting this market driven sales momentum with talk about the improved next generation Volt until they are ready to come out swinging with it. And when they do, it will be to everybody’s advantage – from dealers on up to top GM management – for any remaining Gen 1 Volt inventory to be as small as ideally possible.

    My New Year’s prediction is the next gen Volt will be announced by GM in the second half of 2014. You heard it from me, here, first.


  39. 39
    'georgeBower

    +2

     

    'georgeBower
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    Jan 4th, 2014 (2:17 pm)

    article:

    According to GM’s Kevin Kelly, manager, Electric Vehicle and Hybrid Communications, “Gen 2 is well underway,” he said today, but he could offer no timeframe for this.

    stuart22:

    I predict the next gen Volt will be announced by GM in the second half of the year.

    stuart22:
    Some have expressed a fear that GM is losing interest in the Volt, and perhaps will even cancel it.

    Not a chance.

    My New Year’s prediction is the next gen Volt will be announced by GM in the second half of 2014.

    What will the Gen 2 be? That really is a million dollar question. We could see anything from a radical redesign to minimum changes. I think the one thing most certain is that they will put the new turbo 3 in the gen 2. Beyond that it is anyones guess. Will it have more AER and if so how much? Will they give it more acceleration? Will it share the Cruzes general unibody? Will they keep the “T” pack or put the batteries in the floor? Will they eliminate the 2 mode and go all series in order to radically reduce costs?

    Personally I think they will keep the 2 mode. They have too much invested and wow look at the bright side: They finally found a home for it. So then all we have left is: will it share the Cruze unibody and will it have the T pack??

    I am extremely anxious to find out. My lease is out in May of 2015.

    Any readers want to speculate?


  40. 40
    `Noel Park

     

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    Jan 4th, 2014 (3:29 pm)

    ‘georgeBower: Any readers want to speculate?

    #39

    Bring on the turbo 3. I’m all for more AER. +1

    “Simplicate and add lightness”

    Keep It Simple Stupid

    And my new favorite:

    “No washer gets a free ride” – Colin Chapman


  41. 41
    stuart22

    +1

     

    stuart22
     Says

     

    Jan 4th, 2014 (4:48 pm)

    Gen 2 could be any number of things, from a decontented stripper model to one similar in quality and features to Gen 1, but with improved range and mpg.

    Now with Cadillac in the game, the direction GM chooses to go with Voltec EREV is difficult to predict. My guess is that, in the long run, the Volt will become more of an inexpensive, entry model while Cadillac is where significant breakthroughs will first occur. However at this point, Cadillac has nothing beyond the ELR coupe which is Gen 1 tech.

    The big question I’d like answered is – will Gen 2 tech be introduced in the Cadillac brand first, and then trickle down to Chevy (and what about Buick?) or will it be simultaneously announced for both Cadillac and Chevy? If the latter, I believe GM will be giving Cadillac a more detailed (and costly) sampling of whatever comes out, with Chevy getting a more basic and less expensive format. If there’s anything GM should have learned from the ELR, it’s that electrified Cadillacs must have performance capabilities in line with their priciest competitors. This could mean larger batteries, motors, more sophisticated controls, etc.

    So – where will the Volt end up? I think it will become more value-oriented with pricing at levels which should drive sales volume upwards. I believe Cadillac will use their electrified models to raise the brand’s image, which means content and pricing will be at high levels.


  42. 42
    `Noel Park

     

    `Noel Park
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    Jan 4th, 2014 (4:51 pm)

    stuart22: So – where will the Volt end up? I think it will become more value-oriented with pricing at levels which should drive sales volume upwards.

    #41

    Works for me. +1

    But not at the cost of not improving AER and mpg.


  43. 43
    Sean

     

    Sean
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    Jan 4th, 2014 (7:17 pm)

    Guys I was reading one of the earlier pages about the Ford C Max Energi Solar Roof Concept and I sent an e-mail to my mom.

    This is what she said.

    Great idea! Sure hope they can perfect this concept. If they work, I think they should put them on ALL cars. Imagine the impact it would have on the pollution problem. They should definitely have these on ALL the cars in China!

    Yeah that would be great I know we don’t like the Chinese taking ideas from us and using them as there own but I’ll agree with my mom on this one.

    Who doesn’t want to live in the dirtiest city in the world when you’ve got to wear a gas mask over your face.

    Who doesn’t!

    I sure wouldn’t and who on earth wants to breath in the fumes I’ve heard your eyes can sting over there while in the pollution.

    In no way will I ever want to live over there ever even when it comes to child labor to poor salaries, only one child in the family.

    I’m glad I live in the USA.

    But this doesn’t mean I’m interested in there culture and wanting to respect there own culture.

    Like I said I just don’t like how they run there businesses

    But yes even we still need to fix our own solutions when it comes to pollution in our own country

    Still again on the positive side I would love to see Beijing and the rest of the country China to have clear skis and no smog in the air where you rarely ever see the sun that’s just sad and depressing you know what I hope they can truly fix up these problems wouldn’t you guys agree the only other two places on earth that I can think of that needs to fix up there pollution is Athens and New Delhi

    Where some of the worst pollution is on this planet.

    I’m only saying this because I think solar panels are a great idea for a vehicle and like we all know we need to get away from coal fired power plants and other sources of fossil fuels so we can be energy independent.

    Even if solar panels right now aren’t the best thing for an EV, PHEV, or an EREV.

    These Solar Panels could always be improved in the future when there able to charge up the car quicker like say in the next five or ten years they could be more efficient then ever before and maybe all vehicles could use them!

    The Future Is Electric Not Hydrogen!


  44. 44
    kdawg

     

    kdawg
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    Jan 4th, 2014 (7:22 pm)

    Dave – Phoenix: What is a bigger headline is that total plugin sales more than doubled from 2012 to 2013

    Not quite. My #’s so far are 52,562 in 2012, and 93,927 in 2013. We are still waiting on some #’s from Ford but it won’t a difference.

    So almost double 2012 #’s.


  45. 45
    'georgeBower

     

    'georgeBower
     Says

     

    Jan 4th, 2014 (7:58 pm)

    stuart22,

    What vague and generalized statements. Just address each change I listed in #39 and vote yeh or neh.


  46. 46
    'georgeBower

     

    'georgeBower
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    Jan 4th, 2014 (7:59 pm)

  47. 47
    Ziv

    +3

     

    Ziv
     Says

     

    Jan 5th, 2014 (8:39 am)

    I am with Noel on this one. The Gen II has to have increases in AER and mpg or it would be going backwards. Yes, the price has to continue to come down, but they are within $3k of the median MSRP of a US car now, so the price drops can slow a bit. My priority list shifts from day to day, but:

    1) More AER, at least 42 miles and 45 would be better. Maybe offer a Long Range option of 50 miles.
    2) More back seat legroom.
    3) Lower the price incrementally, year by year.
    4) Faster charging, at least 6.6 kW, (11 miles per hour of charging is pathetic).
    5) At least 40 mpg combined EPA mpg, 42 or more would be better, mainly for the PR aspect.

    `Noel Park: #41

    But not at the cost of not improving AER and mpg.


  48. 48
    Bonaire

    +3

     

    Bonaire
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    Jan 5th, 2014 (2:12 pm)

    GM needs a Voltec CUV. 50-60 miles AER and 37-38 mpg would be nice. Make it as nice as a Honda CR-V and price about 4-5k more than a Volt. Maybe use the Spark EV battery pack.


  49. 49
    kdawg

    +1

     

    kdawg
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    Jan 5th, 2014 (3:38 pm)

    Today, in about 15 minutes, will be the first TRUE winter snow test of the season for my Volt. We’ve had about 8″ of snowfall with another 8 expected. I hope I don’t get stuck. (to be continued…)


  50. 50
    Jackson

    +1

     

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    Jan 5th, 2014 (5:29 pm)

    kdawg,

    Hard to believe, but we’re expecting 6 degrees in Atlanta later this week, possible snow and ice tomorrow. The engine has been coming on when in the 30s already, and AER at startup is showing as 36 consistently.


  51. 51
    Raymondjram

    +2

     

    Raymondjram
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    Jan 5th, 2014 (6:47 pm)

    I read at Inside EVs that Cadillac sold six ELR vehicles in December:
    http://insideevs.com/cadillac-elr-december-2013-sales/

    And keep yourselves warm. Today it was 86 degrees, a very warm day for Puerto Rico.

    Raymond


  52. 52
    Bonaire

    +2

     

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    Jan 5th, 2014 (7:02 pm)

    Jackson: kdawg,

    Hard to believe, but we’re expecting 6 degrees in Atlanta later this week, possible snow and ice tomorrow.The engine has been coming on when in the 30s already, and AER at startup is showing as 36 consistently.

    Looks like EVs have solved global warming in three years of early adoption. We did pretty well.


  53. 53
    kdawg

    +3

     

    kdawg
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    Jan 5th, 2014 (7:17 pm)

    I made it there & back! (barely).
    I don’t think this dawg is going to work tomorrow.
    My driveway looks like I didn’t even shovel it, and it’s still coming down in pounds.

    It took all of my 10.5kWh to drive 18 miles round trip. Actually the last 2 miles were in gas mode.

    Good thing I didn’t have to make a right turn here. I tried to time the lights so I didn’t have to stop, but not always possible. The street in my subdivision was even worse.

    IMG_20140105_182633_391_zps79857dcb.jpg


  54. 54
    Mr Clutch

     

    Mr Clutch
     Says

     

    Jan 7th, 2014 (4:16 pm)

    Jim Seko,

    Here are some facts:

    Chris Paine directed both “Who Killed the Electric Vehicle” and “Revenge of the Electric Vehicle”

    1) Chris Paine owns (or at least owned) a Chevy Volt
    2) Chris Paine had driven his Chevy Volt across the country prior to 10/22/2011
    3) Chris Paine stated something very close to “GM/Chevy may have it right” presumably in reference to EREV and, I believe, based on his personal experience using the Volt and his drive across country.

    Chris Paine stated all of the above during a Q&A session following an afternoon showing of the latter film on 10/22/2011 at Landmark’s NuArt on Santa Monica Blvd. in Los Angeles. Chris and other people in the film(s) and behind the films production, were present at the Premiere event the weekend of 10/21-23 2011, or at least on Saturday 10/22.

    The latter film includes extensive footage and content on the Chevy Volt, on GMs return to EVs (perhaps presented as remarkable, surprising, etc.) given the death of the EV-1 and the first film’s account of that. Further, there is, what seems to be at least a reconciliation or let by gones by by gones between Bob Lutz and Chris Paine in the film. I think it is at least fair to state that Bob Lutz shows no animosity towards Chris Paine – after all this is the revenge of the EV…

    So, the director is a film maker, activist (certainly an EV activist), I don’t see that as Anti-American, one could in fact easily argue quite the opposite.