Apr 16

New LED Lighting Makes Office EVSE Possible

 

By Mark Smolinski (flmark)
 

NOTE: Some of you may be frustrated with the lack of EV charging options available at places you do business or even in community residences (i.e., apartment complexes). As a business owner and EV advocate, I hope to explain why we could not consider installing charging equipment until viable fluorescent bulb replacements came on the market. And hopefully, after you understand what is presented here, you’ll be able to take that knowledge and convince business and property owners that they can, indeed, consider EV charging for their customers and tenants.

To get to this headlined concept, it requires quite a bit of background first:

Some of us, most notably business owners, have to pay attention to how much electricity we are using AT THE MOMENT- not just overall. This is called the “demand charge.” The “demand” is measured in kilowatts (versus kilowatt-hours) and, depending on your location, is normally the highest rate of sustained energy usage over a short-term duration. Typically 15 or 30 minutes, if you are a demand customer, the utility has a watch on you for the worst time of your month. It doesn’t matter if you have your power turned OFF for 29 out of 30 days, if you turn on all your equipment for a short burst, you could pay hundreds of dollars just for this peak usage.

Allegedly, this charge is put there because the utility must build to this peak capacity utilization, and if you need more, you can pay through the nose. Typical residential customers can be blissfully ignorant of having to make sure to switch off one thing when you switch on another, as demand is not billed to them.

Chevy-Volt-ChargingPhoto courtesy of stateimpact.npr.org.
 

My first rude awakening to demand charges came when my electric bill rose to over $500, a figure that I had never even approached before. I called the utility and got an explanation, but then I had to figure out WHY demand had gone through the roof. It turns out that on just one morning, our Southwestern Florida had a bit of a chill. Our staff kicked on the heaters.

That meant electrical strip resistance heaters- on two air handlers. They only turned on the heat for a half hour or so, but that was enough for our demand to go to 38 kilowatts, a high we never again approached. Staff members were given warnings and heaters became off limits (it quickly warms here and heating is rarely required). If you run those numbers, you see that you are not far off from maxing out your standard 200 amp house breaker, and, at approximately $10/kw, you see that the demand charge was $380, or about 70 percent of the bill.

Flash forward a few years until just after we installed our 13 kw of solar on the roof. I had expected my bill to approach zero. Oops, forgot about that blasted demand charge. Solar PV does almost NOTHING to the demand charge, as it is your WORST time of the month that sets the rate, and we know the sun isn’t always shining. So, after spending $100,000 on solar for the roof, I started down a path of spending about another $40,000 to rid myself of more kwh and more kw. One shining (no pun intended) example is the water heater. Energy advocates would promote solar water heating or on-demand type water heaters. While these would lower your kwh overall, they don’t help with demand (and of course, on-demand electric water heaters would exacerbate the situation). A typical electric water heater would contribute about 5 or 6 kw to your demand reading, because that’s what the coils energize to when hot water is required, even just to wash your hands.

solar-roof-items-sm
 

And the problem with solar water heating is that its backup (for cloudy days) are those blasted electric coils again. I have solar water heating at home, but at the office, I have installed a GE Geospring HEAT PUMP water heater, which I can set to never use those coils. So, instead of 5000-6000 watts of electricity, my heat pump water heater can be set to use just 550 watts.

Now let’s keep track of those demand numbers. I mentioned that our worst was 38 kw. Our typical demand reading (pre solar) was 18-24 kw. After I put in the solar, I was noticing we were sustaining numbers below 20 kw. It turns out that the magic number was 21 kw. If you never went above 21 kw, you could stop being a demand customer. However, there were no good graces allowed under Florida tariffs. If you hit 21 kw, you were a demand customer for the next 12 months. Absolutely aggravating. After I installed the solar, I had indeed already had NEGATIVE kwh usage for the month, but still paid over $100 in demand charges.

So beyond the heat pump water heater, we upgraded the air conditioning, put soy-based spray foam insulation in the attic, and applied solar film to the windows, among other things. After finding the right person at the utility, an inspector was sent out and we were removed from demand billing. Our bill went from $200 to $8 in an instant, and because they made it retroactive for a few months, we enjoyed a credit that lasted over a year.

T5-T8-LED-TubePhoto courtesy ChinaLEDLight.biz.
 

Finally, I get back to the titled portion of this article. As I never wanted to again pay a demand charge, it seemed that installing an EV charging station was out of the question. The magic number was 21 kw and we had a healthy margin. Our typical demand fell to about 12 kw. But because of a lack of grace period, I had to ensure we never even approached 21 kw.

While your Volt won’t demand so much electricity, we already know that it is common for EVSEs to output 7 kw (6.6, actually) for other EVs (current, as well as planned models). Do the math and you see that 12 + 7 = 19, which is too blasted close to 21. I lamented, as we now call ourselves “Eco Sensitive Dentistry,” but putting an electric charging station threatened to roll our bill up hundreds of dollars a month- even if only one customer during that month used it.

Enter the latest iteration of green upgrades. We have A LOT of fluorescent tube fixtures. I had always hated the worst part of owning these fixtures, which was replacing the ballast. This year marks the tenth anniversary of the grand opening at our current location. And the ballast failure was just starting to show its head. I had replaced a couple last year- over my head and in a very awkward position against the wall. And the ballasts aren’t cheap- which is what made this whole thing viable from so many standpoints.
You may balk at the cost of T8 replacement LED bulbs for your cheap, mercury filled tubes (I paid approximately $40 per tube for the latest batch of LED tubes), but if it is time to replace ballast, the financial equation quickly becomes a no-brainer.

LED tube replacements are superior for so many reasons. LEDs have the characteristic of directional light. But if those bulbs were only pointed down in the first place, all the light goes where you need it.

helios 3000
Helios 3000 provides directional light to patient’s mouth, not the eyes as with previous types of dentist’s lights used.
 

Subsequently, I found that one LED tube produced nearly as much light as two fluorescent bulbs. The tubes use about half as much electricity, so if you can put in only half as many bulbs, you cut electrical usage by 75 percent. The lighting “temperature” can vary. We put in “daylight white” (nice and bright) for treatment areas. When I put these in my wife’s personal office, they were stark. So, I put in “warm white” in a few places, making the lighting quality preferable to fluorescent tubes, where “atmosphere” was important. And of course, now there will also be less energy wasted as heat, which lowers air conditioning usage.

In a business, you keep those bulbs on all the time and that adds up to a lot of kwh AND measureable kw of demand. Well, I FINALLY just placed the last of my 4 ft led replacements yesterday. There were slightly less than a hundred (I’ll round up) that replaced approximately 200 fluorescents.

Since it has taken me several weeks, I am already seeing the demand number reflected at the meter. As mentioned, 12 kw was a pretty reliable demand number to see. The meter, about to be zeroed again for meter reading time, sits at 9.1 kw.

Where we live in Charlotte County, we do not have an urgent need to run out and get an EVSE. There are only 9 Volts in the county (and we own two of them). It just doesn’t act as much of an incentive for increased business … yet. However, it was, and remains, a goal. Patients are usually in the chair longer than they would be at a restaurant. It was never about the kwh. No matter what, it would be less than a dollar per charge. It was that blasted demand issue. I had scraped every electric item down to the minimum and given up on ever installing an EVSE. It wasn’t until I had to replace those fluorescent ballasts that I took a step back and looked at ALL
those tubes…and the MASSIVE amount of capital, and effort, that lay ahead of me in ballast replacement, that I decided to investigate LED tube replacements. With each LED tube I placed, I realized that I would probably never have my head in that fixture again. And that may have been the best part. [Incidentally, there is no need to actually physically remove the old ballast. Just clip its wires and bypass it before installing led replacement tubes.]

eco sensitive dentistry
 

So, if you have fluorescent tubes, investigate led replacements. Yes, they are expensive. But knowing that you may never have to deal with the bulb (or its ballast) again may be a deciding factor. I have read that as municipalities switch over to LED street lighting, they are doing it for one big reason- labor. Most street lights are unmetered and contracts prevent (at least in the short term) savings via lower electric bills. However, cities that put in LED street lamps (and traffic signals, etc), are finding that their labor savings are tremendous.

And if you are ever driving along I-75 in Southwest Florida, our dental office is just off Exit 170. At some point soon, I hope to have an EVSE installed. Once we do, I will invite you to stop and charge up your Volt while you fill your stomachs at one of our nearby restaurants. And if you just happen to be experiencing oral troubles at the same time, we can determine what ails you. And when you lean back in the chair, you’ll be able to look up and realize that those LED light bulbs get a lot of the credit for being able to recharge your car while the nitrous takes you off to lah-lah land.

This entry was posted on Tuesday, April 16th, 2013 at 5:55 am and is filed under General. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

COMMENTS: 62


  1. 1
    Mark Z

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (6:30 am)

    LED lighting is the future that is here today. The challenge is choosing the right lamp for each location. Brightness, color temperature, beam width and bulb design are just the start. Some lamps will have a different hue within a single production run. Watch how the light from some manufacturers will have a hint of green, yellow, or red tint. Green is the worst and it is frustrating with both LED and CFL. Trial and error while switching lamps from one fixture to the next gives the best result. As new models appear, new discoveries are made. The results can be much better than incandescent or fluorescent. Start with a single bulb purchase and try it in various places. Compare and experiment. I have replaced almost 75 lamps in two homes with LED and there are many more to change. The lower power bills encourage me to upgrade the lamps and enjoy the results.


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (6:35 am)

    Given all the “techno-weenies” (EEs, MEs, etc) we have here, this is a highly-appropriate article!


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    James McQuaid

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (6:40 am)

    Very informative. Thanks Jeff!


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (7:02 am)

    I’m sure the LED lighting will pay for itself in the long run.

    My problem is with the EVSE. I know my opinion isn’t very popular here, but I don’t believe charging away from home will make much difference. And in this particular case, I wonder how many people live over 17 miles from their dentist.

    I know there are exceptions, like charging at work for people who live further away. But for the most part, plug-ins will be charged at home, so the ability to charge away from home won’t make a significant difference.


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    GSP

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (7:08 am)

    Great article, and a great example of how to reduce your electric bill and charge your EV at the same time.

    21 kW is a pretty low threshold to start adding demand charges. Other utilities don’t charge for demand below about 100 kW. The author has done a good job to stay below 21.

    GSP


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    Roy_H

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (7:27 am)

    Wow, I had no idea that demand charge could be so punitive. This will drive a market for used EV batteries to load level on a small scale for individual businesses. Not very practical, as it would be more efficient for the utility company to do this, but in Florida’s case they are forcing their customers to solve the problem.


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    Nelson

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (8:08 am)

    I get wonderful results from the eight LED bulbs that replaced one two tube light fixture in my basement. Each tube was 40watts, now the entire basement is well lit using less wattage.
    http://www.lowes.com/pd_352274-75774-LA19DM/5K/LED_0__?productId=3408610&Ntt=led+bulb&pl=1&currentURL=%3FNtt%3Dled%2Bbulb&facetInfo=

    NPNS!
    Volt#671


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    Loboc

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (8:37 am)

    Last year, I replaced all 15 90w can bulbs with 11w (65w of light) LEDs. I also replaced some halogen under the kitchen cabinets and the ugly 4′ floresents with more LED cans.

    I did this based on comments made here.

    The light quality is much better. LEDs rock!

    I have no idea if I’m getting any net savings. Changing the stove to gas put a noticeable dip on my bill, though. The new SEER 15 A/C unit should make a very noticeable dip this summer.

    My rate is 5.6c with no demand or variable rate.

    OT. The GE wattstation EVSE arrived yesterday! Going on the old stove circuit Saturday.


  9. 9
    ClarksonCote

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (8:53 am)

    Anybody here try the new Cree LED lighting? I’ve been very impressed with their warm 40W and 60W equivalent LED bulbs.

    What’s amazing about them, is that the 40W versions are less than $10! They also use only 6W, and are warrantied for 10 years.

    It’s really a no-brainer almost, if you’re okay with fronting the cost for that bulb.

    http://www.cree.com/lighting/landing-page/cree-bulb

    They’re available only at Home Depot, I think. I’m loving mine so far!


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    Bobc

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (8:55 am)

    About 3 years ago I approached the board of my building about changing all fluorescent tubes in the building over to LED base tubes. I did a proof of concept and after a 6 month test case the bulbs were ordered to the tune of $9000. For 99% of the building. The January before (2010), the bulbs and ballast were replaced consumption was listed 10,017kWh for a bill of $485 for the monthly electric charges of the building common areas, (hallways, garages, laundry room, mail room, etc). The previous year we had reduced the figure from an annual budgeted value of $10,000 for electric by replacing all incandescent bulbs in the 5 stairwells with compact fluorescent bulbs. January 2011 the building monthly bill for common area electric charges dropped to 1575 kWh and we received a credit of $100 for the month . The bulbs paid for themselves in 1.5 years by lower electric costs, lower labor costs for replacement of bulbs and ballast and a projected 60,000 hour life cycle and savings on replacements as well. Ballast were the old magnetic type which lasted about 2 years, bulb life was typically 6 months.

    I currently work for the Port Authority of NY,NJ and they are currently replacing all fluorescent tubes in the Holland Tunnel with LED tubes. That is 1.9 miles of lighting times 4, 2 tubes of tunnel both sides. This change over is projected to save the Port $250,000 per month. Not much compared to their annual budget but as changes are made in all airports, train tunnels and stations, and Port owned buildings and rail cars not to mention tunnels and bridges, the savings figure could reach the tens OS millions of dollars per month.


  11. 11
    Raymondjram

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (9:04 am)

    nasaman:
    Given all the “techno-weenies” (EEs, MEs, etc) we have here, this is a highly-appropriate article!

    What is a “techno-weenie”? I am a professional EE since 1974, and I have played with electric lighting (mostly battery powered) since I was a child in the 1950′s, so I am reveling my age here.

    I have converted 45 lamps in my home to LED lamps, and I just ordered the missing bulbs to converts the last five. I have posted about LEDs here before, since as an EE students, I have played with red LEDs in 1972.

    The key number in buying LED lamps and bulbs is the light output which is measured in lumens. One lumens is the light of one candle at one foot of distance (some LEDs are measured in candelas or candle power).

    The older incandescent bulbs were sold in wattage. A 40 watt bulb gave abot 350 lumens, and a 60 watt buld gave out over 700 lumens. So if you have to replace a 60 watt bulb for a fluorescent or a LED bulb, the replacement will be a 800 lumens bulb which will consume between 12 and 15 watts (a 75% savings).

    For those who are just users (no “techno-weenie”), I recommend Philips and Feit Electric lamps and bulbs. Last week, Costco had a special on 800 lumens Feit Electric LED bulbs for just $14.98 each, so I bought ten. They have a two year warranty and they do comply. I had one bad bulb from a previous purchase, so I called their customer number, gave them information, and in one week, a replacement arrived in the mail.

    The return on the investment is less than one year. If you measure how long your old incandescent lamp is on (hours) every day, and multiple that by the days it is turned on in a year, and finally by its wattage, you can calculate its cost. Divide that by four and that is your new cost, so the difference is the savings. Besides, LED lamps are cooler, safer, have no mercury or glass (as in a fluorescent bulb), and can be dimmed which is a good reason a home may still have incandescent lamps.

    Raymond


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    Steverino

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (10:26 am)

    Philips claims to have achieved the ability to produce 200 lumens of light per watt. A lumen is the standard measure of the amount of light a lamp casts in a given area.

    According to Mark Hand, a technology expert at Philips competitor Acuity Brands Inc., that’s about twice the output per watt of the best fluorescent tubes currently on the market; he estimated the best LED lamps may get up to 120 lumens per watt.

    Cree already advertises an LED lamp it says reaches 200 lumens per watt under some circumstances. Van Schooten said the Philips lamp is different. It will be the first on the market that reaches that level of efficiency and functions across a normal range of temperatures and is capable of consistently producing the same amount of warm white colored light as comparable fluorescent tubes.

    http://www.usnews.com/news/world/articles/2013/04/11/philips-targets-office-market-with-new-led-light


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (10:33 am)

    Green toothpaste… ew! ;)

    One little hidden secret of LED lights, as the LED warms up it loses efficiency and produces less light. Just the opposite of fluorescent lights. Also I still find the spectrum (or the color rendering index if you wish) of LED lights to be inferior even to that of fluorescent lights. In the attempt to offer LED lights at an agreeable price there are a lot of crappy products out there.

    I am old-fashioned and still have 150W dimmable halogen floor lights in all “living” rooms that shine up and reflect light from the ceiling. It is probably the least efficient way to light the rooms, but in my view it offers the best light that is as much diffused as possible and offers the fewest dark shadows and corners. Table lights are a mix between 40W dimmable incandescents and 9W CFLs. Outside/porch lights are all CFLs on timers — they stay on all night.

    The kitchen has all fluorescent tubes, an old “neutral” cloud U-shaped lights in the ceiling and individually lit “warm-white” small tubes under the leading edge of the cabinets pointing towards the wall. Hallways and closets have warm-white spiral CFLs, and the bathrooms currently have 2.8W G25 LED lights from GE. I really hate the light spectrum these produce and only installed them because the previous 9W CFLs were too bright.


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    Steverino

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (10:37 am)

    Of course, you know that some people will now start hoarding 4′ fluorescent tubes.:)


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (10:43 am)

    Raymondjram: nasaman:
    Given all the “techno-weenies” (EEs, MEs, etc) we have here, this is a highly-appropriate article!

    What is a “techno-weenie”?

    Sincere apologies to you & anyone else perhaps insulted/offended by this term. It’s a self-deprecating term sometimes used in technical circles, intending to be pseudo-humorous. From your many posts, Raymond, you’re no “weenie”, so I’d be tempted to instead consider you a “techno-hotdog”. :) :) :)

    PS: Jeff, thnx for deleting my remark in post #2 and giving our Mark Smolinski (flmark) credit for this technically-excellent article! I genuinely applaud you both for writing and selecting it for today’s topic!


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    BLIND GUY

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (10:51 am)

    FLMark, I noticed that you installed an electric heat-pump water heater. We have a heat-pump for our home heating and cooling, so I was considering the water heater as well (the next time it dies). What I am wondering is; would a heat-pump water heater in our enclosed garage lower the temperature in our garage in AZ summers? I am trying to house our Volt in a garage under 100 degrees with the least long-term expense. We’ve already had the garage door insulated which helped a lot. I am thinking that a heat-pump water heater would act like a mild AC unit in our garage? Thanks


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    flmark

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (11:07 am)

    Dave G:
    I’m sure the LED lighting will pay for itself in the long run.

    My problem is with the EVSE.I know my opinion isn’t very popular here, but I don’t believe charging away from home will make much difference.And in this particular case, I wonder how many people live over 17 miles from their dentist.

    I know there are exceptions, like charging at work for people who live further away.But for the most part, plug-ins will be charged at home, so the ability to charge away from home won’t make a significant difference.

    You might be surprised.

    While the vast majority of patients are from nearby areas, before the recession, we had a number of people (and still a few that I know of) coming from distant places. The one that I was always most pleased with was the driver coming from Boca Grande. Boca Grande is the land of rich folks (the Bush family likes to vacation there- all of them- George(s), Jeb, etc). Before this woman moved from Boca Grande, I found it remarkable that she would drive the 50 or so miles, past DOZENS of dentists, to get to OUR office. There is LOTS of trauma in the world of dentistry (bad experiences from past visits). When you treat people right, they will go great distances to come see you.

    Mostly, though, the desire to have an EVSE is a concept of ‘put your money where your mouth is’ (no pun intended for a dental office). AND it is about perception. My wife, Donna, did an awesome job decorating the place and making it feel homey. She will sometimes buy lunch for patients who have been in the chair for hours. We have given people rides home. Often, you do things out of consideration that have little to do with currency exchange. And when you call yourself ECO Sensitive Dentistry, with solar panels on the roof, some of that consideration yields ‘topping off the tank’, so to speak.


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    smithjim1961

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (11:10 am)

    I sympathize with you, Mark. Being a business owner sounds pretty damned stressful. The key thing I learned from your article is that energy efficiency incentives are effective at getting people to conserve energy.

    I would like to see laws changed that exclude owners of rental property from being eligible for tax breaks for energy efficiency upgrades. I live in an apartment and my heating and cooling bills are outrageously high. I don’t know who is against energy efficiency tax breaks for owners of rental property. Conservatives ought to be sympathetic to the idea because they favor tax breaks for business owners and liberals should be in favor because they have a greater tendency to care about sustainability and the environment.


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    flmark

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (11:15 am)

    GSP:
    Great article, and a great example of how to reduce your electric bill and charge your EV at the same time.

    21 kW is a pretty low threshold to start adding demand charges.Other utilities don’t charge for demand below about 100 kW.The author has done a good job to stay below 21.

    GSP

    Indeed, demand charge justification is all over the place. When I investigated the concept where my other house is, in NY, I found I would NOT be a demand customer with my solar. In NY’s case, if you used under 2000 kwh in a month, you were not a demand customer, regardless of actual demand for any given time period. So my discussion really requires further investigation for anyone who MAY be subject to demand charges.


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (11:26 am)

    ClarksonCote:
    Anybody here try the new Cree LED lighting?I’ve been very impressed with their warm 40W and 60W equivalent LED bulbs.

    What’s amazing about them, is that the 40W versions are less than $10!They also use only 6W, and are warrantied for 10 years.

    It’s really a no-brainer almost, if you’re okay with fronting the cost for that bulb.

    http://www.cree.com/lighting/landing-page/cree-bulb

    They’re available only at , I think.I’m loving mine so far!

    Another endorsement here for the Cree bulbs!! I wrote this up a few weeks ago, but Jeff didn’t find it in his in basket until I contacted him again a few days ago. No doubt, the t8 replacements were the most significant part of my LED conversion, but since I wrote this up, I have attacked other non-led bulb issues.

    I just noticed the Cree bulbs at Home Depot a couple weeks ago. These have turned out to be awesome! The t8 bulbs are in larger spaces, but hallways have different bulbs. On the walls, we have sconces which cover the bulb, only allowing light to project down (onto artwork) and up along the wall. LED bulb weaknesses have traditionally included uni-directional projection, even when you want omni-directional projection. I had CFL bulbs in those sconces. Keeping in mind that there were only a few watts to be saved per bulb, I decided to investigate HEAT effect and found that CFL still gives off significant heat (which the air conditioning must remove). Therefore, I decided to give these (relatively) inexpensive bulbs a shot. MUCH IMPROVED over traditional LED lamp bulbs. I went back and got more. I put them in bathrooms, hanging fixtures…holy crap, I didn’t realize just how many freaking bulbs we had. In any case, go to Home Depot and buy a couple of these Cree bulbs just to see for yourself.


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    George S. Bower

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (11:29 am)

    nasaman:

    PS: Jeff, thnx for deleting my remark in post #2 and giving our Mark Smolinski (flmark) credit for this technically-excellent article! I genuinely applaud you both for writing and selecting it for today’s topic!

    Yes agreed. Good wright up Mark.

    I just got done studying this for the last 2 hours. I have 6, 2 tube T12 florescent shop lights in my shop. Looks like the LED replacements are around 40$ each. I will use your advice and start to replace these as my ballasts start to go out.

    The downside I see from reading the Amazon reviews is that all these tube lights are made in China……and as such have a pretty high failure rate right out of the box. Therefore I would NOT order the LEDs thru the mail but instead get them at my local Home Depot.

    The other good info from this article is to experiment w/ different color intensities. Some people don’t like the brightness of the light so mix and match bulbs is good advise. (Although my wife says they went all LED at the art gallery and they got used to it pretty quick.)

    Boy I must say I am impressed with the extent of the battle you had to go thru to do this project….way to go and great write up!!


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (11:40 am)

    Bobc:
    About 3 years ago I approached the board of my building about changing all fluorescent tubes in the building over to LED base tubes. I did a proof of concept and after a 6 month test case the bulbs were ordered to the tune of $9000. For 99% of the building. The January before (2010), the bulbs and ballast were replaced consumption was listed 10,017kWh for a bill of $485 for the monthly electric charges of the building common areas, (hallways, garages, laundry room, mail room, etc). The previous year we had reduced the figure from an annual budgeted value of $10,000 for electric by replacing all incandescent bulbs in the 5 stairwells with fluorescent bulbs. January 2011 the building monthly bill for common area electric chargesdropped to 1575 kWh and we received a credit of $100 for the month . The bulbs paid for themselves in 1.5 years by lower electric costs, lower labor costs for replacement of bulbs and ballast and a projected 60,000 hour life cycle and savings on replacements as well. Ballast were the old magnetic type which lasted about 2 years, bulb life was typically 6 months.

    I absolutely get this, and as mentioned in the preceding response, I continued on the LED path after already seeing results. [The last time I checked, meter was <8 kw of demand, and we had our first $8 electric bill for the first time in two years after I wrote this up.] So I resolved to replace EVERYTHING with LED. The most puzzling were these g24 base CFL (actually, I'll call them FL-C, because they may look like CFL, but after I looked closer, I found ballast up in the ceiling and CFL, by definition, means onboard ballasting) which were in cans in the ceiling. I am proudest of myself for dealing with these, because I had to improvise. I bought new light sockets and utilized existing holes in the can to screw them in place. Then I put regular LED downlights into the sockets. Well, the casual observer will never realize the conversion, but I can pat myself on the back knowing I got rid of 52watts and replaced it with 8 watts for each of eleven fixtures- that I will not have to deal with again. After realizing I had ballast in ceiling for each of these fixtures, I was doubly thankful I undertook the project. Those ballasts would have been a NIGHTMARE to replace.


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (11:49 am)

    Cree Sets New R&D Performance Record with 276 Lumen-Per-Watt Power LED
    February 13, 2013

    Extends Leadership with Highest-Efficacy Power LED
    DURHAM, NC — Cree, Inc. (Nasdaq: CREE) delivers another industry first with a barrier-breaking 276 lumen-per-watt white R&D power LED. This significant milestone exceeds Cree’s previous R&D industry record of 254 lumens per watt and demonstrates Cree’s continued commitment to innovate and accelerate the adoption of LED lighting.

    http://www.researchtriangle.org/news-and-events/cree-sets-new-rd-performance-record-with-276-lumen-per-watt-power-led

    The LED’s are quickly improving these days, just like the li-ion batteries. The better the efficiency in the labs gets, it trickles down to commercial products in 2 years or so. My most efficient (lumens per watt) LED bulb now is about 80 lumens per watt. In a few years, they will hit 180, and an 1800 lumens replacement for the old 100 watt bulb will take only 10 watts (allowing simple heat sinks, not the current expensive heat dissipation systems).

    The theoretical maximum lumens/watt for green light at 555 nm is 683 – so what’s the maximum for white light LED commercial products ? 300 ? 500 ? 600 ? Whatever it is, 276 is at least 40% there.

    In 10 years, those old incandescent bulbs will be as quaint as slide rules.


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (11:54 am)

    Great article Mark!

    You don’t have residential demand charges (that I know of) but you can replace incandescents with LEDs. That’s a bigger savings because the fluorescents are more efficient in the first place. Also, and this can be a big deal in some places, the LEDs are much cooler. Replacing a bank of halogens with LEDs can make a huge difference during the warm months.

    The LED light used to be a little off but the latest generation, at least from Philips and I imagine from Cree and Sylvania as well, are superb. In fact my wife, who is insanely picky about light color, prefers the LEDs to the halogens. Happy Days!

    As for the no-name Chinese bulbs: I had a friend who kept getting these. The light they produced was terrible and he kept having a high rate of failures. The last time I was at his place I noticed that he had just replaced all of them with Philips bulbs. My advice is that, if you want LEDs, you can save money by just getting the quality ones in the first place and not going through the process of buying the junk and then buying the quality ones. I’ll also note that the prices will probably come down, so at this point I’d wait until fall to see where the market is at.

    NOTE: Thanks Jeff I see the Edit function is working!


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (11:56 am)

    Bobc:

    I currently work for the Port Authority of NY,NJ and they are currently replacing all fluorescent tubes in the Holland Tunnel with LED tubes. That is 1.9 miles of lighting times 4, 2 tubes of tunnel both sides. This change over is projected to save the Port $250,000 per month. Not much compared to their annual budget but as changes are made in all airports, train tunnels and stations, and Port owned buildings and rail cars not to mention tunnels and bridges, the savings figure could reach the tens OS millions of dollars per month.

    IMPORTANT POINT. After reading this it brought to mind a couple things. As mentioned, I only put bulbs in half the sockets. Well, in three areas, my wife decided she wanted the additional lighting from those vacant sockets. So I went to go buy three more of these same bulbs and found NONE on Amazon. Further investigation yielded a dearth of the $40 bulbs IN MY CONFIGURATION. I am suspecting that projects like the one discussed above are sucking up a lot of the supply that might have previously been available for consumers. Like it or not, for now, most of these bulbs are arriving from China, and supply constraints may be at issue.

    ***IMPORTANT***I mention ‘MY CONFIGURATION’. There are two approaches to these t8 tubes. Once you bypass the ballast, the electric leads will either BOTH go to the same end of the bulb, and you may or may not need to buy non shunted sockets for that end…OR…one lead will go to EACH end. My configuration was the former case, and as you might suspect, once you commit to wiring one way or the other, you must stick with it. The majority of my fixtures at home were fine with this wiring to the same end. At the office, it was just the opposite and I had to buy lots of those (<$1) sockets. So bear in mind, there is a MAJOR difference in concept and you'll want to investigate method of wiring before plunging into this or that bulb if you have lots to deal with as I did.


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (12:16 pm)

    vdiv:
    Green toothpaste… ew!

    One little hidden secret of LED lights, as the LED warms up it loses efficiency and produces less light.Just the opposite of fluorescent lights. Also I still find the spectrum (or the color rendering index if you wish) of LED lights to be inferior even to that of fluorescent lights.In the attempt to offer LED lights at an agreeable price there are a lot of crappy products out there.

    I am old-fashioned and still have 150W dimmable halogen floor lights in all “living” rooms that shine up and reflect light from the ceiling.It is probably the least efficient way to light the rooms, but in my view it offers the best light that is as much diffused as possible and offers the fewest dark shadows and corners.Table lights are a mix between 40W dimmable incandescents and 9W CFLs.Outside/porch lights are all CFLs on timers — they stay on all night.

    The kitchen has all fluorescent tubes, an old “neutral” cloud U-shaped lights in the ceiling and individually lit “warm-white” small tubes under the leading edge of the cabinets pointing towards the wall.Hallways and closets have warm-white spiral CFLs, and the bathrooms currently have 2.8W G25 LED lights from GE.I really hate the light spectrum these produce and only installed them because the previous 9W CFLs were too bright.

    My suggestion is to keep looking. The Cree LEDs I just installed had no perceptible change in ‘warmth’ from what they replaced. My wife had been thinking she wanted a new paint job in her personal office. She lost that desire after I put in the ‘warm white’ led tubes. Her paint colors gained the depth she wished for, that the fluorescents were dulling. Lots of color temperature options are (becoming) available.

    Jeff put a fairly innocuous comment under my Helios 3000 treatment lamp photo that I sent. We actually converted these lamps AT GREAT EXPENSE a couple years ago. My wife actually WISHED it was all about the energy savings or light bulb longevity, because she would have said ‘no’ due to the expense. However, these lamps offered a couple HUGE advantages over the halogen they replaced. Most significant was the ability to ALTER the color temperature. You see, the resin (cavity filling) material is cured by UV light. The bluer the light, the faster the material sets up. Sometimes you even have to start over because you could not work fast enough with the light shining down on your work area. These LED lights allow Donna to shift the color over to the warmer end of the spectrum to give her more time to craft the restoration.
    Check out this video and you’ll see (at around 50 seconds) the adjustment of lighting temperature.

    So if you can’t find light color that makes you happy, keep looking. You’ll find it eventually- certainly more options than available with other lighting technologies- unless you paint the bulb surface- and that’s just cheating.

    …and, while not easy to find, I was able to find a U shaped bulb for the one place I needed it
    http://www.shineretrofits.com/neptun-light-nubt8-88018-led-unv-18-watt-18w-22-u-bend-t8-led-tube-glare-free-meso-lens-5-year-warranty.html


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (12:35 pm)

    BLIND GUY:
    FLMark, I noticed that you installed an electric heat-pump water heater.We have a heat-pump for our home heating and cooling, so I was considering the water heater as well (the next time it dies).What I am wondering is; would a heat-pump water heater in our enclosed garage lower the temperature in our garage in AZ summers?I am trying to house our Volt in a garage under 100 degrees with the least long-term expense.We’ve already had the garage door insulated which helped a lot.I am thinking that a heat-pump water heater would act like a mild AC unit in our garage?Thanks

    ‘Mild’ AC unit to say the least. Yes, you can feel the cool air coming out of the Heat Pump Water Heater. Our heat pump water heater is located in a non-climate controlled utility space, and I believe that limited space does benefit from the cooling. Most garages are sieves regarding air flow. You will get cool air, but unless you make a lot of hot water, seal that garage up tighter than a drum and insulate it well, I expect you won’t notice much difference. However, it can only help. The hotter the air, the more readily the heat pump will heat the water and the less electricity you will use.

    If I were in your shoes, I would go with the solar water heating; if you put a small solar panel on the roof to run the circulating pump, then there is zero ongoing cost to make your hot water (unless you use lots or it gets cloudy). Of course, there definitely a substantial price premium for this option, but I think of it as improving the value of the home. As discussed in the post, solar wins out unless demand charges are an issue; I have solar at home, but heat pump for the office. [Or if your house is shaded; I have a Geospring at my NY home as well, because the home is heavily shaded- but I doubt this is an issue for you in AZ]


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (12:54 pm)

    Hey, check this out:

    2v8pjqx.jpg

    mstc0.jpg

    Light is directed to the sides for more natural home lighting, and the interior of the bulb is filled with a silicone oil to dissipate heat buildup for greater life and efficiency. This allows larger “wattages” than pretty much any other kind of home-use LED bulb.

    Yes, they’re expensive, but costs should come down within a year or two.

    http://www.switchlightingco.com/


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (1:04 pm)

    flmark,

    flmark,

    flmark:

    .The majority of my fixtures at home were fine with this wiring to the same end.At the office, it was just the opposite and I had to buy lots of those (<$1) sockets.So bear in mind, there is a MAJOR difference in concept and you’ll want to investigate method of wiring before plunging into this or that bulb if you have lots to deal with as I did.

    I have T12 flourescent shop lights now. Which LED wiring configuration do I need to get. What are these<1$ sockets you are refering to.


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (1:35 pm)

    Here are the sockets
    http://www.amazon.com/Leviton-13357U-Lampholder-Non-Shunted-Programmed/dp/B00522MPTA/ref=lh_ni_t?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A1OKQR6K61KBEK

    Unfortunately, I found no definitive way to identify socket type by visual examination. If you see holes on only one side, you definitely have a shunted socket. I also saw ‘S’ for shunted on some sockets. At the office, I literally had to tear the cardboard backing off one before I understood what I had in my hand. You see, I started at home, where all the sockets were just fine. Then, at the office, I flip the light switch and then, POP, the breaker trips. As you might suspect, if the socket is shunted, you just created a short, as the two leads are now connected directly to each other.

    As my mission was to eradicate the ballasts, I made no attempt to pay attention to color coding before I clipped the wires. Yellow, black, white, red, blue…it was mind numbing if I was trying to figure it out. I do suspect, however, that the colors of the various wires would have told me whether the sockets were shunted if I had known what to look for. I did figure out I think, by the end, to assume that one wire per socket meant shunting (two wires, non-shunting), regardless of the rainbow of colors.

    I suggest you examine the wiring after removing the bulbs. The office had 4 undercounter fixtures where visual inspection of the wires made me realize that no socket replacement seemed required. While we are not supposed to use safety equipment for diagnostic purposes, it wasn’t until I flipped the switch, and the breaker did NOT trip, that I knew for sure that my sockets were not shunted and I could proceed with bulb installation in those fixtures.

    Remember that, after disconnecting ballast from incoming (black and white) leads, they can only be hooked up one of two ways- both to the same end or one to each end. A wiring diagram with the bulb will show you which is the case. After that, the only difference becomes which socket style you have- or will need to buy. I would let the bulb purchase decision be your guiding factor and then have the socket accommodate that decision. I got my first batch of bulbs a year ago and did not know this concept. I ended up getting both-wired-to-one-end type bulbs. After perusing my options a couple weeks ago, I am thinking that most bulb availability is now the opposite configuration of what I have.

    I wish I could be of more help, but manufacturers proved that they have no standard in their sockets. Indeed, the mystification for me, with that first office socket, when I had to tear it apart, was ‘why have holes on both sides for wires if they can only short out the socket’. If they all stuck with holes on one side for shunted sockets and holes on both sides for non-shunted sockets, it would be MUCH easier to quickly identify the need (or lack of) to buy alternate sockets. Thank God for breakers.


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    Skotty

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (1:42 pm)

    Unlike CFLs, I really like LED lights. I am looking forward to installing more of them. The only thing holding me back is cost, but costs are coming down so it shouldn’t be long. I was very happy to see that I could buy PAR20 LED bulbs for $20 each recently, whereas 6 months previously they were running $30 each. That’s a big price drop, and it’s getting close to the cost where I can start considering buying in bulk.

    Having an EVSE at a dentists office would be an incentive for me to choose that dentist. And since you generally spend upwards of an hour for dentists appointments, it’s a fairly reasonable place to have one. Certainly moreso than a place like Walgreens where you are generally only there for 10 minutes.

    Public EV charging is not big right now because the EVSE’s are in the wrong places (IMO). When I look at where the public chargers are in my home town of KC, I find I have no reason to visit any of those locations. If they would install one at a mall or strip mall or restaurant or place of entertainment, I would use them. But no, they have them in places like the local city courthouse parking garage. That’s great for the 1 time every 10 years I visit the courthouse.


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    George S. Bower

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (1:48 pm)

    flmark,

    If one has shunted sockets then one would want a wire at each end of the LED. If one has non shunted sockets then either wiring config would work. Is that correct.

    Also couldn’t one just check continuity on the socket to find out if it’s shunted or not?


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (1:50 pm)

    Skotty:
    Unlike CFLs, I really like LED lights.I am looking forward to installing more of them.The only thing holding me back is cost, but costs are coming down so it shouldn’t be long.I was very happy to see that I could buy PAR20 LED bulbs for $20 each recently, whereas 6 months previously they were running $30 each.That’s a big price drop, and it’s getting close to the cost where I can start considering buying in bulk.

    Having an EVSE at a dentists office would be an incentive for me to choose that dentist.And since you generally spend upwards of an hour for dentists appointments, it’s a fairly reasonable place to have one.Certainly moreso than a place like Walgreens where you are generally only there for 10 minutes.

    Public EV charging is not big right now because the EVSE’s are in the wrong places (IMO).When I look at where the public chargers are in my home town of KC, I find I have no reason to visit any of those locations.If they would install one at a mall or strip mall or restaurant or place of entertainment, I would use them.But no, they have them in places like the local city courthouse parking garage.That’s great for the 1 time every 10 years I visit the courthouse.

    Glad you made this comment! It makes perfect sense. If I knew it would make a difference here in Charlotte county, I’d be dealing with it now. We have, however, the oldest folks on average in the country (MEDIAN age is OVER 60). Not the first market that comes to mind in the purchase of EVs [although I would argue with their 'fixed income' arguments that an EV should be the FIRST thing that comes to mind...but I didn't invent the phrase about old dogs and new tricks]


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (2:01 pm)

    Great article! Many thanks.


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (2:07 pm)

    George S. Bower:
    flmark,

    If one has shunted sockets then one would want a wire at each end of the LED. If one has non shunted sockets then either wiring config would work. Is that correct.

    Also couldn’t one just check continuity on the socket to find out if it’s shunted or not?

    The problem with the continuity check is the size of the holes (quite small) vs the size of the leads on your multimeter. Just because you didn’t get an indication of zero resistance, it doesn’t mean you got the lead to connect to the conductive surface beyond that tiny little hole. You might be able to tell a shunted socket if you jammed it in there and got zero resistance, but you could not be certain of having a NON shunted socket, given those tiny holes.

    As to your first statement, the bulb will dictate, not the wiring. Don’t reverse the scenario and wire anything up without the bulb in hand. You see, with my current batch of bulbs, that require both leads at the same end, the other end is inert. No metal, or wires required. The socket has one job- mechanical support- at the other end. You could hang it with string at that end. My bulbs make it easy, in that I can ignore the socket assembly at the end of the bulb that has no writing near its terminals. And in my case, that means I can CHOOSE whichever end is more convenient to send the leads to (from where they come into the fixture- and four feet makes quite a bit of difference in choosing an end, if you indeed have the choice).

    …and, if I am reading what you wrote correctly, having only shunted sockets MIGHT mean the REQUIRED purchase of non-shunted sockets (depending on bulb purchase), but having non-shunted sockets does not mean you would have a similar purchase requirement. The wiring diagrams I have seen seem to indicate that either pin will work on one end. In any case, any non-shunted socket can be made shunted by simply using the middle 2 (of the 4 total) holes to connect a short wire over between the two pins on that side of the bulb.


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    Jackson

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (2:31 pm)

    Little known and often overlooked is the induction, or electrodeless lamp. With service lives approximately twice that of equivalent LED lamps, similar operational savings and greater efficiency at higher light outputs, they are most often used in factories, public parking garages (and increasingly, in street lighting fixtures):

    zilhex.jpg 1442x6r.jpg 15qq3qh.jpg

    2njeih5.jpg

    2saffac.png

    Don’t let the round tube in the image above fool you into thinking of the old circuline bulb; the cross-section is typically over 2″ and the high-density phosphor is too bright to look at comfortably. It is a true torus with no end electrodes (“induction” refers to the method of energizing the internal gas; the dark bands are external coils). These are fluorescents on steroids, available in a range of color temperatures, and offering good color rendition.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrodeless_lamp

    http://www.everlastlight.com/street-and-area-fixtures/wellworth-cobra-head.html

    https://www.sylvania.com/en-us/newsroom/press-releases/Pages/quicktronic-icetron-outdoor-induction-lighting-systems.aspx


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (2:35 pm)

    ClarksonCote,
    The CREE bulbs are great for the traditional incandescent look of a bare bulb. They do have a teeny tiny bit of green cast, but are totally acceptable. Unlike Philips, they dim well and don’t have a obnoxious greenish light at low levels.

    I have found that Sylvania have the most green cast at full brightness. Philips bulbs are more yellow and their flame shaped 4 watt bulb is excellent at full brightness if you want a warmer look. The older GE floods that have the four visible LED reflectors feature a nice hint of red if you want a less yellow look in either a 3000 or 2700K flood.

    I am still wanting GE to create a perfect LED Reveal lamp. There are commercial companies featuring the dimming of LED so the lowest dim levels have that orange warm look instead of a cold cool appearance.

    http://www.junolightinggroup.com/splash_juno_warmdim_LED.asp

    Costco currently has a sale on a 75 watt replacement PAR30 LED flood from Feit Electric that uses 15 watts. If you like a bright 3000K pure white light, the $11.99 sale price is excellent for 790 lumens at a 38 degree beam spread.


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (2:41 pm)

    Steverino:
    Of course, you know that some people will now start hoarding 4′ fluorescent tubes.:)

    There are LED replacements for those 24-inch and 48-inch fluorescent tubes. I have both at home. They fit in the same fixtures, but the ballast is removed, because the tubes connect directly to the AC lines from the wall switch. No more “burnt ballasts”!

    Raymond


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (2:53 pm)

    Mark Z:
    ClarksonCote,

    Costco currently has a sale on a 75 watt replacement PAR30 LED flood from Feit Electric that uses 15 watts. If you like a bright 3000K pure white light, the $11.99 sale price is excellent for 790 lumens at a 38 degree beam spread.

    Costco now sells a package of three 7.5 W LED dimmable bulbs from Feit Electric (500 lumens) for $19.99. These replace the 40 W incandescent bulbs, which many homes have in bedrooms and hallways. The light is warm white (3000 K) and the replacement warranty is now three years:
    http://www.feit.com/conserv_energy/led_lamps/globe/bpceag-500-3

    The Costco item number is 728181. They can operate in damp environments, so they are indoor and outdoor rated.

    Raymond


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (3:30 pm)

    Jackson: Hey, check this out:

    Light is directed to the sides for more natural home lighting, and the interior of the bulb is filled with a silicone oil to dissipate heat buildup for greater life and efficiency.This allows larger “wattages” than pretty much any other kind of home-use LED bulb.

    Yes, they’re expensive, but costs should come down within a year or two.

    http://www.switchlightingco.com/

    As I understand it, the Cree lights still run even cooler, and are much cheaper. That’s why they have lower wattage for the same light output. At 6W for 40W equivalent, and 9W for 60W equivalent, $10-$13 each, 10 year warranty, and looking nearly identical to a normal light bulb, they’re hard to beat.


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (3:31 pm)

    Raymondjram: Costco now sells a package of three 7.5 W LED dimmable bulbs from Feit Electric (500 lumens) for $19.99. These replace the 40 W incandescent bulbs, which many homes have in bedrooms and hallways. The light is warm white (3000 K) and the replacement warranty is now three years:
    http://www.feit.com/conserv_energy/led_lamps/globe/bpceag-500-3

    The Costco item number is 728181. They can operate in damp environments, so they are indoor and outdoor rated.

    Raymond

    $20 for three isn’t that bad, but these do use 25% more energy than the Cree 40W. Then again, when we’re talking such low wattage values it’s probably not significant :)

    The 10 year warranty on Cree is hard to bea though; What’s the warranty on these?


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (3:39 pm)

    ClarksonCote: As I understand it, the Cree lights still run even cooler, and are much cheaper.That’s why they have lower wattage for the same light output.At 6W for 40W equivalent, and 9W for 60W equivalent, $10-$13 each, 10 year warranty, and looking nearly identical to a normal light bulb, they’re hard to beat.

    It is my understanding that the bulbs use Cree (or Cree-style) LEDs; the breakthrough is the form factor. The cooling system allows more chips to be used without damaging heat buildup, while offering an emission pattern similar to a standard incandescent. Once prices come within reach, these bulbs may cause even the reluctant to “switch.” ;-)

    fkwfw6.jpg 15i40g3.jpg

    The LED chips are surface-mounted on metal fingers which help dissipate heat to the silicone oil, which in turn spreads it out over the surface of the glass envelope. The conventional heat sink keeps the ballast cool.


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (4:10 pm)

    Jackson: It is my understanding that the bulbs use Cree (or Cree-style) LEDs; the breakthrough is the form factor.The cooling system allows more chips to be used without damaging heat buildup, while offering an emission pattern similar to a standard incandescent.Once prices come within reach, these bulbs may cause even the reluctant to “switch.”

    The LED chips are surface-mounted on metal fingers which help dissipate heat to the silicone oil, which in turn spreads it out over the surface of the glass envelope.The conventional heat sink keeps the ballast cool.

    Fair enough, but the Cree Light form factor seems to be a bit better, or so it seems. It also, at least on the surface, looks to have a much simpler manufacturing process (and therefore, hopefully, a lower manufacturing carbon footprint).

    Image here: http://www.cree.com/lighting/landing-page/cree-bulb


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (4:15 pm)

    Raymondjram: Costco now sells a package of three 7.5 W LED dimmable bulbs from Feit Electric (500 lumens) for $19.99. These replace the 40 W incandescent bulbs, which many homes have in bedrooms and hallways. The light is warm white (3000 K) and the replacement warranty is now three years:
    http://www.feit.com/conserv_energy/led_lamps/globe/bpceag-500-3

    The Costco item number is 728181. They can operate in damp environments, so they are indoor and outdoor rated.

    Raymond

    Actually, I think these are the same light bulbs that Cree sells, just sold under a different company/license. In fact, the screen capture I got of the Cree light bulb, from the Cree website, points to a feit.com image (see above).

    Although, Cree must have done something different internally, since their run cooler and use less wattage for the same output. Interesting nonetheless.


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (4:44 pm)

    Here is a great photo of the exterior and interior of the CREE LED Bulb:

    http://www.technologyreview.com/view/512126/cree-introduces-an-led-bulb-edison-would-love/

    The protective opaque coating adds grip and helps avoid dropping the bulb.

    This is an illuminated comparison photo with incandescent:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/BGKIsNZCYAEeHWU.jpg


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    Streetlight

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (4:57 pm)

    flmark: Then I put regular LED downlights into the sockets.

    Hi Mark: Having just read about new product LED room lighting, here’s an article that adds to what you’re looking to achieve.

    http://www.eetimes.com/design/smart-energy-design/4412016/Philips-claims-LED-light-efficiency-record

    It could well be Philips shows interest in your well detailed article.

    (For readers who don’t know EE TIMES:
    Since the 70′s EE TIMES was electronics industry’s leading EE paper pub. In 1999, EE TIMES was acquired by UK based UBM, a 100 year old publisher, which owns a whole lot including sister pub Design News.)


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (5:44 pm)

    Streetlight: Hi Mark:Having just read about new product LED room lighting, here’s an article that adds to what you’re looking to achieve.

    http://www.eetimes.com/design/smart-energy-design/4412016/Philips-claims-LED-light-efficiency-record

    It could well be Philips shows interest in your well detailed article.

    (For readers who don’t know EE TIMES:
    Since the 70′s EE TIMES was electronics industry’s leading EE paper pub. In 1999, EE TIMES was acquired by UK based UBM, a 100 year old publisher, which owns a whole lot including sister pub Design News.)

    While I would certainly like to spread the word to a bigger audience, I doubt that Philips would want my discussion, as I didn’t use their bulbs.

    If inclined, please feel free to submit the material to EE Times; since I am an ME, they would probably ignore anything I might send them. Certainly, no one that I have read about is using my methodology. Lots of kwh saved guidance, but freeing up demand usage so that you can use it for other electrical applications would seem like something that would be of interest to them.


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (5:59 pm)

    flmark:

    since I am an ME, they would probably ignore anything I might send them.

    As an ME, I’m still laughing.
    Good one!


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (8:34 pm)

    I need more LED bulb replacements and hope that the Cree LED 60 watt replacement will help?

    Also I hope these bulbs will get cheaper in the future close to CFL prices around $5.00 or even better around incandescent bulb prices at $1.00-$2.00 a bulb now that would be great!


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (8:46 pm)

    Also Cree is American so support them can’t say if the product is American made?

    But it’s always good to check and here are some indoor down llights from Eco Smart on Homedepot.com

    It says it uses 625 lumens and only consumes 9.5 watts of electricity.

    But it would be nice if they could bump up those lumens some without making those watts going up?

    Still I hope these are helpful if someone wants to replace those lights in there kitchen, bathroom, or even the hallway just to say.

    http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/202240932?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&keyword=Cree&storeId=10051&N=5yc1v&R=202240932#.UW3vt8ptbAM


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (9:28 pm)

    Re: EcoSmart at Home Depot

    I’ve bought a bunch of these EcoSmart bulbs (not the one in the link, but screw in bulbs). They are reasonably priced, do a good job and dim nicely with the proper switches. Inventory is another issue, though. [Perhaps because I have bought so many] I mentioned previously that I used led downlights in the office cans; this is what I used
    http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/203605659?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&storeId=10051&N=5yc1vZ4b8&R=203605659#.UW35sLXD9ow
    The online site showed sparse inventory, so I ended up ordering what I had left to install (7) and they arrived today. I also have gotten sizes larger and smaller than this
    http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/203605655?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&storeId=10051&N=5yc1vZ4b8Z4b8&R=203605655#.UW36WrXD9ow
    http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/203202029?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&storeId=10051&N=5yc1vZ4b8Z4b8&R=203202029#.UW36iLXD9ow
    & I’ve been pleased with all of them


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    Apr 16th, 2013 (10:33 pm)

    What would your yearly cost be if you went over 21kW?
    What is the average profit margin on 1 patient?
    If an EV charger allowed you to gain just 1 patient, would it pay for itself?


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    Greg

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    Apr 16th, 2013 (11:30 pm)

    Another Cree believer. I’ve bought over 20 of the 800 lm bulbs already.


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    Apr 17th, 2013 (12:07 am)

    kdawg:
    What would your yearly cost be if you went over 21kW?
    What is the average profit margin on 1 patient?
    If an EV charger allowed you to gain just 1 patient, would it pay for itself?

    Maybe you missed certain parts of the discussion-
    -if you overshoot the 21 kw JUST ONCE, you are on the demand billing schedule for the next YEAR
    -demand charge is about $10/kw IF you cross the threshold, and ZERO if you do not. Hmmm…$200 vs $0…for the next year because ALL kw are now on the table at $10/kw
    -the month I got myself off demand billing, I went from a bill over $200 to $8 and my current bill was $8 this month, (with 300 kwh carried over to next month from solar)

    …crossing the threshold has THOUSANDS of dollars of ramifications over the following 12 months
    …so NO, it would NEVER pay for itself in profit margin.

    …and besides, the same demographic that would want EV charging would be APPALLED to find out that charging their car entirely negated the effect that the solar on the roof has on the electric bill

    I don’t know in what spirit your question was asked, but you kind of MISSED all the expense I incurred to get OFF this billing system…that forty thousand spent in foam insulation, new air conditioning, solar film on the windows, etc. The kwh are CHEAP, demand billing is NOT! The point of the discussion, as stated at the beginning was to hope you gathered enough information to show business/apartment owners how they could budget an EVSE into the mix and still have a cheap electric bill. Crossing the demand threshold is to be AVOIDED here.

    Now if you are already a demand customer, and never hope to be released from the burden, the math is also simple. You would need to expect to pay an EXTRA $70 (at 6.6 kw charge rate) for EACH Level 2 charger you had in place or $30 for plugging into any old electrical outlet. If this is your scenario, and you were sure that you did indeed get a new customer during that month, who did more than xray, cleaning, exam of a first visit or recall appointment, then it might be worthwhile. However, if they just did that basic service combo I mentioned, then again, an extra $70 to get them cost you money.


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    Apr 17th, 2013 (1:53 am)

    This article illustration of night time charging benefit. In general would be beneficial to use separate metering for EVSE.
    To make the same beneficial day time charging next step would be V2G arrangement when electric vehicle could serve as short time backup (during seconds) for electric grid and supporting not diminishing grid capacity during peak hours. I have feeling that would be much more cost efficient than changing LED lamps or installing solar roofs.


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    Apr 17th, 2013 (9:40 am)

    flmark: I don’t know in what spirit your question was asked, but you kind of MISSED all the expense I incurred to get OFF this billing system…that forty thousand spent in foam insulation, new air conditioning, solar film on the windows, etc. The kwh are CHEAP, demand billing is NOT!

    I followed the article, and I was asking out of curiosity. Even if you have to pay more for your electricity, all of the benefits of using less electricity, and being more efficient would still be effective. It would just mean your bill didn’t go down. So I was trying to figure out how many more customers/patients you would have to accumulate to pay for the extra cost of the electricity. I know dental work can be expensive, so I thought maybe it would not be that many, but apparently the #’s don’t work out.


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    Apr 17th, 2013 (11:41 am)

    kdawg: I followed the article, and I was asking out of curiosity.Even if you have to pay more for your electricity, all of the benefits of using less electricity, and being more efficient would still be effective.It would just mean your bill didn’t go down.So I was trying to figure out how many more customers/patients you would have to accumulate to pay for the extra cost of the electricity.I know dental work can be expensive, so I thought maybe it would not be that many, but apparently the #’s don’t work out.

    If you found yourself offering a service that none of your competitors did, and which all your customers desired, it would make a lot of sense to spend more to help generate that service. This would be capitalism at its finest. At the other end of the extreme, in the most altruistic sense, you provide a service that NOBODY is willing to pay for, your competitors couldn’t care less about, yet you spend money on it because it is THE RIGHT THING TO DO. For us, that would be the (mercury) amalgam separator we have in our discharge lines. http://sensitivedentistry.net/green.html#a2
    This is not mandated, nor would we expect it to provide incremental value to the dental experience. You publicize it in the hopes that you can a) get like minded people to be your customer and b) pressure your competitors into doing the right thing, along with you. (Think ‘dolphin safe’ tuna). Each ‘green’ item in the bag is often a mix of capitalism and altruism. If you offer EV charging, and no one takes advantage of it, nor cares, you have simply wasted the money to install the charger and accomplished nothing. Maybe California is filled with people who can be stimulated by such conscience/financial incentives, but here in God’s waiting room, no one is yet interested in EV charging. We’ve been advertising ‘green’ for a couple years now. While a number of ‘green’ people are patients, NONE of them has an EV. EV charging is the goal, and a goal that is now easier with demand worries gone. We will get there eventually.


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    Apr 17th, 2013 (1:29 pm)

    flmark: Maybe California is filled with people who can be stimulated by such conscience/financial incentives, but here in God’s waiting room, no one is yet interested in EV charging.

    That’s too bad. I guess it’s just going to take more time. I have my choice of 3 theaters near me in Michigan. I only go to the one that has EV charging. So it worked on me. I have not seen any other businesses put up a charger yet, so we are not at California levels. When I travel, if I know which parking garages have EV chargers I use those, even if it means a little further walk.


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    Apr 17th, 2013 (1:31 pm)

    Oh, and I was going to say, this article & comments were *enlightening* to me. I plan to go to Home Depot after work today and pick up some LED bulbs.


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    Apr 17th, 2013 (11:00 pm)

    kdawg:
    Oh, and I was going to say, this article & comments were *enlightening* to me.I plan to go to Home Depot after work today and pick up some LED bulbs.

    Nice. If you’re looking for the Cree bulbs at Home Depot, you may need to look outside the lighting aisle. I found a few stores that have a big promo end-aisle full of them, but none are in the LED aisle! Kind of crazy if you ask me!


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    Apr 18th, 2013 (12:25 am)

    ClarksonCote: Nice.If you’re looking for the Cree bulbs at Home Depot, you may need to look outside the lighting aisle.I found a few stores that have a big promo end-aisle full of them, but none are in the LED aisle!Kind of crazy if you ask me!

    I’ll second that, indicating the need that when I return to Central NY, I’ll have to go look for them in the same end display as in the two Charlotte County Home Depots that I have been in. The truly sad part is that I was ahead of the employee curve, as well. I walked away from the led light bulb (standard) display and walked over to two HD employees and asked if they had led bulbs anywhere else in the store. They said ‘no’. I asked about the Cree bulbs. [Very convenient to have smart phone]. They recognized the image. The woman said, ‘I’ve seen those recently.’ She then remembered and pointed to the end display about 40 feet away.


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    Apr 18th, 2013 (6:23 pm)

    ClarksonCote: Nice. If you’re looking for the Cree bulbs at Home Depot, you may need to look outside the lighting aisle. I found a few stores that have a big promo end-aisle full of them, but none are in the LED aisle! Kind of crazy if you ask me!

    Was funny, i was looking everywhere on the racks, and finally asked a helper. He pointed them out in the cardboard stands right in front of me. I bought 3 of the 40watt ones, and spent $20 on an LED light to replace my halogen ceiling light. Wow, its bright.