Oct 19

Video: Chevy Volt One Year Review

 

How healthy would the U.S. economy be if in five years from now, the average gas price were to be $7.25 per gallon, never to decline, and still on its way up?

Whether you believe this will happen – and if it does things will be OK or not – a car like the Chevy Volt, for which we have a one-year review video posted below – can travel around 38 miles more or less on electric power – with gasoline backup. Since it is a part-time EV, the Volt is resistant to rising fuel costs, and is a hedge against the economic decline that some say could follow assuming prices do rise.

Do you realize how utterly dependent this civilization we’ve built is upon oil? Petroleum is used for way more than just making combustible fuels. It is used in chemical manufacturing, and actually, nearly every man-made object we have come to enjoy in our modern lives has some tie-in to oil and its byproducts. Can you think of anything that doesn’t?
 


 

The person who submitted this Volt review video is more than in tune with these realities. He is a Peak Oil advocate who goes by the name of MrEnergyCzar. Regulars here have no doubt seen his comments on this Web site, and in the forum.

He, as were many of you, was one of the early ones in line to buy a Volt. His motivation was it was part of his 10-year plan to prepare for the effects of how things could go considering most independent oil experts say conventional petroleum production peaked in 2006, and as for the U.S., that event happened in 1970.

MrEnergyCzar believes that society won’t grow by burning more and more lower grade oil resources, like tar sands or heavy oil, that take more money and energy to extract and process.

“I cannot control oil geology, but I can mitigate some of the peak oil potential negative effects on my home, life and family with careful planning, change, persistence, sacrifice and perseverance,” says MrEnergyCzar. “In other words, I’m creating my own peak oil insurance policy.”

That’s his rationale, and he’s sticking to it. Whether your personal reasons to be interested in the Volt involve reducing carbon emissions, other pollutants, improving energy security, national security, patronizing an American business, or merely paying less in monthly gas bills, it does not really matter.
 


 

MrEnergyCzar’s one-year review video has you covered, but just so you know, his concern is the global macro economy given the world uses oil for far more than just burning to power our personal vehicles.

He is writing a book on the subject from which I reviewed an excerpt. It actually pulled me in, and got my attention with straight facts evenly delivered. He has given this topic a lot of research, and his approach comes across as rational and his arguments are cogently presented, but I won’t give the book’s details away here.

As for how the Volt fits into the book’s storyline, that I’ll share. Like any car, the Volt also requires oil to build, but once it’s in your possession, it can conceivably use very little oil to run, which at least is half the battle.

MrEnergyCzar says he gets around 300 mpg in his Volt given he usually stays on electric power minimizing the need to draw from the fuel tank. And to get his electricity, he uses surplus solar generated juice from his utility free New England home along with charging at work via a donated charger. He adapted the way he lives to be in sync with the amount of power the sun provides for his home and car.

His approach to predicted petroleum decline and rising prices, he said, was not to put his head in the sand and deny. Nor was it to scream doom and gloom or head for the hills.

Instead, it was and is to progressively wean his suburban lifestyle away from unnecessary consumption – while retaining a high quality of life in suburbia. So, assuming petroleum does become more and more scarce, he will not be caught short.
 


 

His message is free for all, and he readily shares it on his Web site, Facebook, Twitter, other avenues, including YouTube – that latter of which, we’re posting one example of here.

While he does make a small income from his advocacy efforts, they have been mostly on him. His day job is in the helping profession with a nonprofit, and he’s a helper by nature. He spends many hours per month developing his social network to express what is essentially a sideline passion he’s researched extensively since 2007.

He says he does not expect people to necessarily buy into all he says at once, but be forewarned, he has done his homework. He is also obviously intelligent, sane, and so … assuming you are too, he may be worth listening to more, if you’re not already in tune with his worldview.

And in any case, he gives a nice straightforward review of the Volt from his personal perspective which does not require belief in anything except MrEnergyCzar speaks from the heart, and GM has engineered one fine extended-range electric car.

Oh also, in the video he mentions a “red dot” on the graphic pasted on the back of his bumper. What does it mean?
 


 

It represents where we are about to be or will be during most of the Volt’s life in terms of the “conventional” oil production curve.

If you have other observations or questions you can address them as usual in the comment section below.

And if you like the video, this could be a good one to share with those misinformed about the Volt.

This entry was posted on Friday, October 19th, 2012 at 5:55 am and is filed under General. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

COMMENTS: 70


  1. 1
    Mark Z

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (6:31 am)

    A perfect topic for the weekend; Chevy Volt and Peak Oil. With the recent fuel price price peak in California, the residents got a sample of the problems that would occur as supplies decrease. As the nation moves toward energy independence, the number one solution is to decrease the use of oil. No better way than the enjoyable Chevy Volt and other EV models that fit the driver’s daily drive.

    Congratulations to MrEnergyCzar for a great report, video and proving that the Volt can get amazing lifetime MPG. Thanks for sharing the results and keeping us informed on Peak Oll.


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    nasaman

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (6:42 am)

    Mark Z: Congratulations to MrEnergyCzar for a great report, video and proving that the Volt can get amazing lifetime MPG. Thanks for sharing the results and keeping us informed on Peak Oll.

    Agreed —and the video even has a couple of zingers that perked up my interest by “got solar girl”!

    /I’ll be emailing my skeptical friends/family this excellent Peak Oil video using its YouTube link at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYPI0RO_qM4&feature=player_embedded#


  3. 3
    Eco_Turbo

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (7:02 am)

    If breweries had regulations like the oil industry, we’d be talking about Peak Beer. GM should push the performance qualities of the Voltec drive.


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    xiaowei1

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (7:24 am)

    loved the video, it was not belittling and it answered many questions common viewers may ask. the vehicle certainly lived up to its expectations; exceeding them. Suffice to say, the video speaks volumes about a well thought out car.


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    MrEnergyCzar

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (7:24 am)

    I want to thank Jeff for the great article. As mentioned above, sharing the video or article is a great way for Volt members here to spread the message…..

    Thanks,

    MrEnergyCzar


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    kdawg

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (9:17 am)

    Nice video Czar.

    Gas prices are dropping like crazy the last week (not sure what’s going on). I wonder what the oil companies will do to keep prices low and prevent EV’s from taking hold?

    Michigan has a proposal on the ballot regarding green energy. It seems controversial (lots of negative ads on television), but I’m just glad more people are talking about renewable energy.

    Here’s the proposal:

    PROPOSAL 12-3
    A PROPOSAL TO AMEND THE STATE CONSTITUTION
    TO ESTABLISH A STANDARD FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY
    This proposal would:
     Require electric utilities to provide at least 25% of their annual retail sales of
    electricity from renewable energy sources, which are wind, solar, biomass, and
    hydropower, by 2025.
     Limit to not more than 1% per year electric utility rate increases charged to
    consumers only to achieve compliance with the renewable energy standard.
     Allow annual extensions of the deadline to meet the 25% standard in order to
    prevent rate increases over the 1% limit.
     Require the legislature to enact additional laws to encourage the use of Michigan
    made equipment and employment of Michigan residents.
    Should this proposal be approved?
    YES __
    NO __


  7. 7
    Tom

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (9:52 am)

    I’ve long been of the opinion that we would find the technology and resources to deal with peak oil in a timely manner. The Peak Oil curve that MrEnergyCzar has on his bumper is essentially in line with that belief. Recently, however, I have considered another possibility. I call it the drinkers at the keg party theroy. Basically, if there were many drinkers at a keg party and they continued to arrive as the night grows on and someone noticed at some point that the keg was half empty would the drinkers proceed to drink slower and conserve their keg or continue to drink at the current rate even as more people arrive, causing the keg to empty rapidly? A chart of the latter would look more like a cliff than the smooth gradual peak oil curve. Now consider that the drinkers are oil producers motivated by high oil prices.


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    N Riley

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (9:53 am)

    Good report and video. One thing I disliked. We should stop making blanket statements about people on the “right” being against the Volt and what it stands for. I fit in the right side of the political arena and I very much appreciate the Volt. There are many more like me.

    But good job otherwise.


  9. 9
    Loboc

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (10:17 am)

    Tom:
    I’ve long been of the opinion that we would find the technology and resources to deal with peak oil in a timely manner.The Peak Oil curve that MrEnergyCzar has on his bumper is essentially in line with that belief.Recently, however, I have considered another possibility.I call it the drinkers at the keg party theroy.Basically, if there were many drinkers at a keg party and they continued to arrive as the night grows on and someone noticed at some point that the keg was half empty would the drinkers proceed to drink slower and conserve their keg or continue to drink at the current rate even as more people arrive, causing the keg to empty rapidly?A chart of the latter would look more like a cliff than the smooth gradual peak oil curve.Now consider that the drinkers are oil producers motivated by high oil prices.

    The thing about peak oil is that nobody knows when the top of that bell curve will be hit (or if it already has) and on the way down, the price increases exponentially (which it is not. yet.).

    The recent problem in CA was supply of refined product. There was not a supply problem with the base commodity (crude oil).

    There are still another dozen (relatively cheap) kegs in the garage at this point. Until the price goes up quite a bit, alternatives can’t compete directly.

    I admire Mr. Czar’s enthusiasm, but, to do what he is doing is considerably more expensive than using NG or other fossil fuels.


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    DonC

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (10:36 am)

    Nice video!

    I liked the shots driving along the two lane country road. From experience I can say the Volt is a fun car to drive on these types of roads. The low centered battery pack and the very responsive electric drive makes these types of twists and turns a blast!


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    Oct 19th, 2012 (10:39 am)

    MrEnergyCzar,

    I noticed you didn’t like the mats either. In Michigan, we get rough winters and you need mats that will hold snow/mud. I installed deep rubber ones.

    You can sort of see it here.
    2012-08-04_13-49-44_10.jpg

    2012-08-04_13-46-10_817.jpg


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    Tom

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (11:00 am)

    Loboc,

    Many people believe the peak was hit in 2006 based upon total oil consumed thus far, divided by the projected recoverable oil as projected by every country in the world. That amount could change, but new discoveries are rare. Peak Oil is the half way point. In my Keg theory I am suggesting that production could continue to increase past the halfway point as higher prices encourage further development of the finite resource. As for exponential prices a 7% annual inflation rate equates to doubling every 10 years. In today’s terms that would be $8 a gallon gas, which would leave a lot of us on foot, but worst yet wreak havoc on food prices as well as consumer goods made of oil (plastic bottles, chemicals, etc.) We can adapt to that rate, and I do believe that is the rate we are currently in. The real test comes when we hit the steep downward slope of the traditional Peak Oil bell curve, or the cliff in my keg theory. If 2006 is Peak then that critical point would take place in about 20-40 years. Oh and I agree California was basically a refinery supply problem. Its worth noting that the U.S. has been exporting an increasing amount of refined oil products recently.


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    Chuck

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (11:11 am)

    N Riley,

    I agree. I’m quite conservative but have followed the Volt since the concept.
    In fact, I ordered my Volt just as the production line shut down. Will receive
    delivery in Dec. Can’t wait…


  14. 14
    Solar Joe

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (11:19 am)

    Great Article and Video. Mr.Czar, I have learned so much about the Volt and the feature the car offers thanks!


  15. 15
    Steverino

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (11:49 am)

    N Riley:
    Good report and video.One thing I disliked.We should stop making blanket statements about people on the “right” being against the Volt and what it stands for.I fit in the right side of the political arena and I very much appreciate the Volt.There are many more like me.

    I suspect he is referring not to you, but to the mediamongers like Rush, Hannity, Beck, Cavuto, Drudge, Romney, Gingrich, Rep Darrel Issah, etc. and their online equivalents. You don’t see Rachel Maddow, Obama, etc. bashing the Volt. There is an anti-Volt bias on the right that pushes a narrative of the Volt as a complete failure in every way. Recall the Fox news test drive where they claimed the Volt “broke down” in the Lincoln Tunnel because the car switch from battery to gas? Saddly, just one of many, many hit jobs.

    I’m a registered Republican who is not voting that way this year. I did not leave the party, they left me.

    I think Bush signing the EV tax credit into law may be seen as his “Nixon goes to China” moment. Without that tax credit, I would not be driving a Volt today. In contrast, today’s GOP has disavowed the tax credit and blamed it on Obama while rushing to suckle on the teats of big oil. They have no inclination to discuss peak oil (other than to deny it) or to prepare our country for its effects.

    I’m sure there are plenty of Dems that can (or have) been bought as well, but I’m voting for the guy who at least sat in a Volt instead of the one who said cars can’t run on sunshine or wind power and who uses global warming as a laugh line. MrEnergyCzar puts the lie to that notion.


  16. 16
    Jeff Cobb

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (11:52 am)

    Thanks all – just a heads up – a version of this is posted to HybridCars which gets more mainstream general traffic – including from fence sitters and fans of other vehicles/technologies/viewpoints – if anyone wants to chime into how factually accurate the comment stream will go …

    http://www.hybridcars.com/news/one-year-chevy-volt-review-video-55167.html


  17. 17
    Loboc

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (12:00 pm)

    Tom,

    A lot of big ‘IF’s in there. I think that the price is being manipulated. There is not a lack of crude (yet). There is a lack of production.

    A more important issue in my view is the pollution from all the oil burning. That’s the main reason I’m buying a Volt.


  18. 18
    pjkPA

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (12:02 pm)

    Here in western PA .. natural gas is plentiful… would like to see a CNG backup generator for the Volt.
    There are a few natural gas stations popping up… my brother drives a Ford CNG F250 that costs the same to run on CNG as his tiny 4cyl nothing car… not enough CNG stations though to make his trip to Florida.

    I’m still waiting for a more roomy CUV Voltec vehicle that you don’t have to climb in and out of.

    Good to hear of people using residential solar to power cars…


  19. 19
    Dave K.

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (12:11 pm)

    = We should stop making blanket statements about people on the “right” being against the Volt and what it stands for. I fit in the right side of the political arena and I very much appreciate the Volt.”

    Niel Cavuto and Biil O’Reilly have been very clumsy in their delivery of Volt related reports. Romney and his, ”Volt, a car whos’ time has not come”. These talking heads need to better inform the public.

    As for Romney. It’s fine for him to dislike the EV tax credit. I feel most here will agree that the tax credit along with 5% OF ALL GOVERNMENT SPENDING could use reducing. This includes reduction of lifetime benefits for government employees. With their yearly pay increase tied directly to GDP. A raise of 1.7 % sounds about right.

    Throwing tax payer cash at battery and solar panel makers is also unfair and reckless. Didn’t anyone in D.C. have the brains to buy EV’s for Police and government transport use? Maybe covert half the government buildings to solar? This would both grow green business AND get something in return for otherwise drunken gambling sprees on the tax payers dime.
    I feel Romney will be elected next month. The right had better take control with sober and focused action. No smirks or country club reward parties. The Cadillac ELR will soon be available. I can see Romney using the ELR as part of his White House pool.
    Better not blow it Republicans. Or the entire lot of you will be down the road in 2016. What does Romney say? ”I like firing people”.


  20. 20
    Thomas J. Thias

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (1:01 pm)

    We did NOT begin the EV/”Big Oil” wars. Those of us that have chosen to place our currency in the new emerging technologies have done so in part because of the $4.00 cost of a gallon of gas from June through November of 2008 that came out of nowhere!

    This punishing gas cost spike came on top of the collapse of the financials, the worldwide corporate money run and the bused balloon of mortgage securities.

    The billions of dollars sucked from households worldwide, the severe economic hemoraging incured by families, mom and pop businesses, Auto Companies, and local, regional and national economies was staggering.

    By early December of 2008, gas had suddenly dropped over the span of weeks down to $2.00 or so a gallon BUT by this time the damage had already been done.

    I said then and I will state it here, “Never Again!”

    Never Again will I pay $4.00+ a gallon for 90% of my daily driving-

    We were helpless then, as No alternatives to personal and fleet travel exhisted.

    “Big Oil” NEVER apologised and NEVER said sorry. Done with it!

    Now with every major auto maker concentrated on bringing the P.H.E.V. and P.E.V. Electromotive platform to market the tide has turned.

    Chrystler, having R/D issues and Toyota aparently not technolocicaly advanced enough to mass market such a platform will stay the Hybrid course for now. Chrystler with it’s parent company, Fiat will bring to market a passenger car in the near term.

    The electrification of commercial medium duty short haul fleet vehicles, FedX for example, urban mass transit and livery services are ramping up.

    Personaly, now at 9,000 miles since March of this year and using 6 gallons of gas to do so at a cost to me bout a buck a day, electric, I’m done with the high cost of gas.

    Sure, in the future, I’ll run cross state or cross country from time to time but 95%+ of my driving is now pennys on the mile.

    Steverino is right. The tidal wave of antiVolt and EV reteric is relentless and malitiously disinforming to the masses. From the above mentioned commentators, opinion pieces, blogs, tweets, web article comments sections, video’s, email’s…the scope of this propaganda goes on and on.

    This Republic has had political mudslinging during election seasons for over 200 years. At times over these centuries the discourse has been ripe and vile.

    Folks, this campaign against the Amazing Chery Volt EREV and other Alternative Fueled Vehicles has been relentless since the Volts introduction at the NIAS of 2007.

    The Volt is just a machine. An American Made/ American Fueled alternative way of daily driving. Called a masterpiece by many the Amazing Chevy Volt Extended Range Electric Vehicle works for me. Might just make sense to you as well.

    There, I have weighed in. Mr. Energy Czar has put forth a very informative video. Just the facts with a touch of humor. The fact that this machine has outsold one half of all new car nameplates in North America as we approach the first year anniversary of national availabillity speaks plenty in its favor.

    GoVoltGo

    Best-

    Thomas J. Thias


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    Noel Park

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (1:11 pm)

    Steverino: I’m voting for the guy who at least sat in a Volt instead of the one who said cars can’t run on sunshine or wind power and who uses global warming as a laugh line.

    #15

    Me too. Nice comment. +1


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    Noel Park

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (1:12 pm)

    Loboc: A more important issue in my view is the pollution from all the oil burning. That’s the main reason I’m buying a Volt.

    #17

    Excellent point. Thanks for the reminder. +1


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    Oct 19th, 2012 (3:04 pm)

    Loboc: A lot of big ‘IF’s in there. I think that the price is being manipulated. There is not a lack of crude (yet). There is a lack of production.
    A more important issue in my view is the pollution from all the oil burning. That’s the main reason I’m buying a Volt.

    It would be interesting in a hypothetical near-future, where electricity is free, recharges take the same time as fueling a gas car, and electric cars cost the same as gas cars and have the same performance. How many people would still drive gas cars? I think we would be surprised how many still would. I think that speaks to the core hurdle that EV’s face. It’s not just cost, or pollution, or recharge times, etc… there’s a whole gasoline culture that needs to be overcome.

    EDIT: An example I was going to give was the telephone. My parents have cell phones, but refuse to give up their land line. I have a cell phone, grew up with land lines, but ditched mine around the year 2000. My niece & nephew have cell phones, and they barely know what a land line is.


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    Noel Park

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (3:24 pm)

    kdawg: It’s not just cost, or pollution, or recharge times, etc… there’s a whole gasoline culture that needs to be overcome.

    #24

    It’s all about the price of gas IMHO. How many times have we seen wild swings in Prius sales? When the price of gas spikes they go to waiting lists and when it falls back again they offer incentives.

    The price of gas is falling back a little bit in SoCal, but the cheapest I have seen so far was this AM at Costco, $4.29 for regular. If it hangs up over $4 much longer Volt sales are going to get a boost. When the pain gets to be too much at the pump people tend to reach for higher mileage cars even if the math doesn’t really work. When it eases off a little bit they go back to pickups and SUVs with an equal level of irrationality. Or at least that’s my take.

    I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard Chevy salespeople wishing that they had some kind of a Prius fighter. At least now they do.


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    nasaman

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (3:28 pm)

    Steverino: I’m a registered Republican who is not voting that way this year. I did not leave the party, they left me… I’m voting for the guy who at least sat in a Volt instead of the one who said cars can’t run on sunshine or wind power and who uses global warming as a laugh line. MrEnergyCzar puts the lie to that notion.

    I agree completely— Romney & Washington, DC Republicans have gone stark, raving mad!


  26. 26
    kdawg

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (3:49 pm)

    Noel Park: It’s all about the price of gas IMHO. How many times have we seen wild swings in Prius sales? When the price of gas spikes they go to waiting lists and when it falls back again they offer incentives.
    The price of gas is falling back a little bit in SoCal, but the cheapest I have seen so far was this AM at Costco, $4.29 for regular. If it hangs up over $4 much longer Volt sales are going to get a boost. When the pain gets to be too much at the pump people tend to reach for higher mileage cars even if the math doesn’t really work. When it eases off a little bit they go back to pickups and SUVs with an equal level of irrationality. Or at least that’s my take.
    I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard Chevy salespeople wishing that they had some kind of a Prius fighter. At least now they do.

    I’ll agree with you that when gas spikes, more efficient gas cars are purchased, but they are still gas cars, and its not extremely large #’s we’re talking about. When gas was/is $5/gallon people still buy cars that are sub 20mpg. People like Cavuto will be the last hold outs. They view electric cars as weak, compromising, toys for hippies and nerds. All misconceptions. So in my hypothetical world, where I removed any possible disadvantage assigned to EV’s, there will still be people like Cavuto, that will just flat out refuse to drive on electricity. Luckily humans only live for about 80 years (if you’re lucky), and new generations won’t be so prejudiced.


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    Opp Chg

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (3:52 pm)

    Steverino: I’m voting for the guy who at least sat in a Volt instead of the one who said cars can’t run on sunshine or wind power and who uses global warming as a laugh line.

    Great quote – I’m stealing this!

    (The guy who sat in the Volt also said “When I’m no longer President, I’ll buy one!”) Guy is not allowed drive – gives the Secret Service fits. :)


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    Oct 19th, 2012 (3:57 pm)

    OT: Is Hamtramck cranking yet? And when will the first ELR roll off the line later this year?


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    Loboc

     

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (4:42 pm)

    kdawg,

    Most people don’t care what size engine they have or if it is electric or poop-powered. They just get in and drive (while talking on the phone, putting on makeup, and eating). I don’t see a major hurdle just a slight change in how it gets fueled. Heck, my wife hasn’t put gas in her car for over 10 years. It just automagically gets filled on the weekend. (guess who).

    I still have my land line because I’ve had the same number for 20 years. I did switch it to magic-junk @ $2/month just to keep it alive.

    kdawg,

    There is traffic on the forums talking about getting ordered cars in December. The ELR won’t roll until late 2013 (as a 2014) right?


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    Connie M

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    Oct 19th, 2012 (5:07 pm)

    Great video MrEnergyCzar…is “got solar girl” your GF? Would love to get a ride in your Volt…


  31. 31
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    Oct 19th, 2012 (5:32 pm)

    Connie M:
    Great video MrEnergyCzar…is “got solar girl” your GF? Would love to get a ride in your Volt…

    I’m very lucky to have “Got Solar Girl”… she is electric more ways than one..:)


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    Oct 19th, 2012 (5:35 pm)

    kdawg:
    Nice video Czar.

    Gas prices are dropping like crazy the last week (not sure what’s going on).I wonder what the oil companies will do to keep prices low and prevent EV’s from taking hold?

    Michigan has a proposal on the ballot regarding green energy.It seems controversial (lots of negative ads on television), but I’m just glad more people are talking about renewable energy.

    Here’s the proposal:

    PROPOSAL 12-3
    A PROPOSAL TO AMEND THE STATE CONSTITUTION
    TO ESTABLISH A STANDARD FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY
    This proposal would:
     Require electric utilities to provide at least 25% of their annual retail sales of
    electricity from renewable energy sources, which are wind, solar, biomass, and
    hydropower, by 2025.
     Limit to not more than 1% per year electric utility rate increases charged to
    consumers only to achieve compliance with the renewable energy standard.
     Allow annual extensions of the deadline to meet the 25% standard in order to
    prevent rate increases over the 1% limit.
     Require the legislature to enact additional laws to encourage the use of Michigan
    made equipment and employment of Michigan residents.
    Should this proposal be approved?
    YES __
    NO __

    Unless there is a national and global renewable energy standard it’s too little too late doing it state by state…. Competing industry has an incentive to fight it down and legally they can financially influence lawmaking votes… Change that and things can happen…

    MrEnergyCzar


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    Oct 19th, 2012 (6:24 pm)

    MrEnergyCzar: Unless there is a national and global renewable energy standard it’s too little too late doing it state by state….

    #32

    Well I dunno, but we do have such a law here in CA. And the utilities do seem to be trying to gear up to comply. Stay tuned.

    Not unlike the first car emission control laws that came out of CA and spread nationwide. We can hope so anyway.

    “Lead, follow, or get out of the way”


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    Oct 19th, 2012 (6:31 pm)

    Loboc: There is traffic on the forums talking about getting ordered cars in December. The ELR won’t roll until late 2013 (as a 2014) right?

    Yes, its supposed to start production before the end of this year, and it will be a 2014.


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    Oct 19th, 2012 (6:38 pm)

    Tom:
    I’ve long been of the opinion that we would find the technology and resources to deal with peak oil in a timely manner.The Peak Oil curve that MrEnergyCzar has on his bumper is essentially in line with that belief.Recently, however, I have considered another possibility.I call it the drinkers at the keg party theroy.Basically, if there were many drinkers at a keg party and they continued to arrive as the night grows on and someone noticed at some point that the keg was half empty would the drinkers proceed to drink slower and conserve their keg or continue to drink at the current rate even as more people arrive, causing the keg to empty rapidly?A chart of the latter would look more like a cliff than the smooth gradual peak oil curve.Now consider that the drinkers are oil producers motivated by high oil prices.

    Ahhh! Finally a subject that I am overqualified for. You missed the third and proven by real world experiences actual outcome. They drink faster in an effort to not loose out :)


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    Oct 19th, 2012 (6:39 pm)

    Loboc: Most people don’t care what size engine they have or if it is electric or poop-powered. They just get in and drive (while talking on the phone, putting on makeup, and eating). I don’t see a major hurdle just a slight change in how it gets fueled.

    People don’t just adopt new technology. Look how long hybrids have been around and how little market share they have. And those really aren’t any different than a normal car. There’s a lot of FUD to go around, on top of old-school mentality. Even if EV’s magically overcame all the obstacles/excuses for not buying one overnight, tomorrow at the dealer’s lot, many people would still buy a gas car. It’s going to take word of mouth, and exposure, to reach a level of trust where people don’t think twice about buying an EV.

    This only covers the “new technology” aspect. There’s also a social stigma attached to EVs. This image needs to be shaken before mass adoption. That’s just how I see it, and my experience answering questions from strangers.


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    Oct 19th, 2012 (6:45 pm)

    kdawg: I’ll agree with you that when gas spikes, more efficient gas cars are purchased, but they are still gas cars, and its not extremely large #’s we’re talking about.

    #26

    Quite true, but there really haven’t been viable electric cars before. And every spike is a bit higher and more painful than the last one, so my hope it that the trend will just accelerate. And that the now available EVs will provide a more efficient option that the previous more efficient gas cars.

    kdawg: there will still be people like Cavuto, that will just flat out refuse to drive on electricity.

    Sorry to keep saying it, but “Stupid is as stupid does”. Plus people like Cavuto are just show business personalities IMHO. They have no actual philosophy, they just mouth whatever their writers and handlers tell them will get ratings with their niche of the market. Again, I think it’s best just to ignore them and let them rant to whoever it is that likes hearing it.


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    Oct 19th, 2012 (6:47 pm)

    koz: Ahhh! Finally a subject that I am overqualified for. You missed the third and proven by real world experiences actual outcome. They drink faster in an effort to not loose out

    #35

    Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhh, yeah, LOL. +1


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    Oct 19th, 2012 (6:52 pm)

    Dave K.:
    = We should stop making blanket statements about people on the “right” being against the Volt and what it stands for. I fit in the right side of the political arena and I very much appreciate the Volt.”

    Niel Cavuto and Biil O’Reilly have been very clumsy in their delivery of Volt related reports. Romney and his, ”Volt, a car whos’ time has not come”. These talking heads need to better inform the public.

    As for Romney. It’s fine for him to dislike the EV tax credit. I feel most here will agree that the tax credit along with 5% OF ALL GOVERNMENT SPENDING could use reducing. This includes reduction of lifetime benefits for government employees. With their yearly pay increase tied directly to GDP. A raise of 1.7 % sounds about right.

    Throwing tax payer cash at battery and solar panel makers is also unfair and reckless. Didn’t anyone in D.C. have the brains to buy EV’s for Police and government transport use? Maybe covert half the government buildings to solar? This would both grow green business AND get something in return for otherwise drunken gambling sprees on the tax payers dime.
    I feel Romney will be elected next month.The right had better take control with sober and focused action. No smirks or country club reward parties. The Cadillac ELR will soon be available. I can see Romney using the ELR as part of his White House pool.
    Better not blow it Republicans. Or the entire lot of you will be down the road in 2016. What does Romney say? ”I like firing people”.

    I think the generalization being made (and pretty accurately IMO) is not that all on the right are against the Volt, rather it is all against the Volt are on the right. All squares are rectangles but not all rectangles are squares. Personally, I think the non-square rectangles should take up the issue with the squares and not the non-rectangles. They are the ones ruining the rectangles’ reputation.


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    Oct 19th, 2012 (6:54 pm)

    koz: Ahhh! Finally a subject that I am overqualified for. You missed the third and proven by real world experiences actual outcome. They drink faster in an effort to not loose out

    Or start hoarding their own stash of beer and telling their buddies they don’t have any.

    Hopefully someone would tweet the kegs running low, so no more people came to the party and instead they would go to cocktail lounge where they were serving tequila sunrises (solar) and Jager bombs (nuclear) ;)

    If this happened enough they may become a home-brewer (solar panels)


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    Oct 19th, 2012 (7:09 pm)

    kdawg:

    EDIT: An example I was going to give was the telephone.My parents have cell phones, but refuse to give up their land line.I have a cell phone, grew up with land lines, but ditched mine around the year 2000.My niece & nephew have cell phones, and they barely know what a land line is.

    A little OT:

    I worked with the local telephone company for 37 years (the last two with the new Claro company, which belongs to Carlos Slim). I firmly believe in keeping the land line at home. It only failed once in 35 years, I have 2 MB DSL service (with a WiFi network at home which I am using now) and I could get digital TV if I ask.

    BTW, how does your nephews and nieces access the Internet? Do they have a home network of computers and printers? Data usage though the cellular service is costlier than DSL. And if the cellphone battery runs down when there is a power outage, how can they call for service? The land line has a 48 VDC circuit so it powers the phone and ringers. It has worked flawlessly when we get hit by tropical storms and hurricanes. Phone service and DSL through cable is also using a land line and it needs 120 VAC to work!

    Raymond


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    Oct 19th, 2012 (7:53 pm)

    Dave K.:
    = We should stop making blanket statements about people on the “right” being against the Volt and what it stands for. I fit in the right side of the political arena and I very much appreciate the Volt.”

    Niel Cavuto and Biil O’Reilly have been very clumsy in their delivery of Volt related reports. Romney and his, ”Volt, a car whos’ time has not come”. These talking heads need to better inform the public.

    As for Romney. It’s fine for him to dislike the EV tax credit. I feel most here will agree that the tax credit along with 5% OF ALL GOVERNMENT SPENDING could use reducing. This includes reduction of lifetime benefits for government employees. With their yearly pay increase tied directly to GDP. A raise of 1.7 % sounds about right.

    Throwing tax payer cash at battery and solar panel makers is also unfair and reckless. Didn’t anyone in D.C. have the brains to buy EV’s for Police and government transport use? Maybe covert half the government buildings to solar? This would both grow green business AND get something in return for otherwise drunken gambling sprees on the tax payers dime.
    I feel Romney will be elected next month.The right had better take control with sober and focused action. No smirks or country club reward parties. The Cadillac ELR will soon be available. I can see Romney using the ELR as part of his White House pool.
    Better not blow it Republicans. Or the entire lot of you will be down the road in 2016. What does Romney say? ”I like firing people”.

    Very good post…
    especially…”reduction of lifetime benefits for government employees. With their yearly pay increase tied directly to GDP.” except I would say GNP instead of GDP… GDP includes the money generated by foreign companies who build plants here and DO NOT PAY TAXES.. they effectively suck billions OUT of our economy… that’s why Japan would NEVER let GM or Ford build a plant in JAPAN. GNP is what matters!

    The big question is WHY DO GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES STILL GET FREE MEDICAL WHEN ALL TAXPAYERS HAVE TO PAY HALF!!! Making government workers pay like the rest of us… all taxpayer funded jobs including teachers pay half of their medical just like the rest of us… this alone would cut the deficit more than any proposal I’ve heard.


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    Oct 19th, 2012 (8:20 pm)

    Raymondjram: I firmly believe in keeping the land line at home.

    #41

    Yeah, I think about getting rid of mine sometimes but the cell service at my house is shaky enough the connections are just so much better. Plus it’s bundled with the DSL and the cable TV so it costs like $9.95/month for unlimited use in CA. So I just keep it for a backup.


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    Oct 19th, 2012 (11:01 pm)

    Raymondjram: BTW, how does your nephews and nieces access the Internet? Do they have a home network of computers and printers?

    Typically their phones, but sometimes they bust out a bulky laptop and use WiFi. They have a cable modem, which also gets used for online gaming for their multiple gaming systems.

    I wonder what they would do if I showed them a rotary phone?


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    Oct 19th, 2012 (11:27 pm)

    Regarding the phone land line. If preparing for Peak Oil, you keep the land line (corded phone for simplicity and power outages) and for redundancy and because they use much less energy than cell towers. Many cell towers may not be able to be maintained, they already have costly back-up battery systems and so forth. Remember, in a no growth world, we go backwards in complexity, not forwards. What about Internet phone? Keeping those server farms humming won’t be cheap…… Keep the land line along with another way to communicate. Always have multiple ways to do the same thing…. it’s communication insurance.

    MrEnergyCzar


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    Oct 19th, 2012 (11:40 pm)

    Great to know that some republicans are buying the Volt. Riley and others it is not to bash the republicans but when a party bases its success on propaganda from Fox, Beck, Rush etc something need to be said. Just listen to a big media channel Fox to put out lies, bs on daily basis what does it suggest? You cant believe what it says but Fox, GOP knows that to keep the low IQ people in the fold feed them the lies, bs and keep them angry. Not a way to run for political office? is it?


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    Oct 20th, 2012 (4:01 am)

    A great article and a very nice video by MrEnergyCzar, Thank you!
    I hope this report will guide more people in the right direction.

    I followed a similar thought proccess as MrEnergyCzar explains – having seen the oil crisis in ’73, the ever resurfacing complaints about higher gas cost (yet people keep buying bigger cars / SUV’s …), reading about ‘peak oil’ etc. For these reasons I did want to reduce our dependency on oil and contribute to a cleaner environment.

    So, four years ago we had solar installed and the system I requested was – on purpose ! – oversized with a view towards owning an electric car.
    I did follow all the early reports on this forum – initially by Dr Lyle and now handled as well & capable by Jeff. Now we own the Volt almost one year and it is the best car we have had:
    I fully agree w/ all the descriptions of handling, acceleration, comfort given in the video and many other places.
    (I would have bought the car earlier, but dealers initially wanted a “premium”, as much as 10 k$ !)

    Like MrEnergyCzar, our driving habit is to use “L” mode = one foot driving – love it for the regenerative breaking !

    Due to trips to Lake Tahoe (*), Folsom etc. we ‘only’ drive 86 % on electric – but we are happy that we can drive about 11 000 miles per year on solar w/o cost incurred (other than the initial investment)

    (*) Did get 75 miles on one battery charge driving home (= downhill) !

    Our Volt = Powered by the sun’s electrons


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    Oct 20th, 2012 (8:37 am)

    MrEnergyCzar: Regarding the phone land line… What about Internet phone? …Keep the land line phone along with another way to communicate. Always have multiple ways to do the same thing… it’s communication insurance.

    MrEnergyCzar

    First of all, thanks VERY MUCH for this superb weekend lead topic/article and video!

    OT: Regarding land lines & redundancy in phones: For the past 1 1/2 yrs I’ve been saving ~$100/mo by “cutting the cord” on my land-line phone, WHILE AT THE SAME TIME I’ve enjoyed excellent voice/signal quality PLUS full telephone redundancy, the following way:

    1) Using wi-fi/voip for telephoning at home or in all other wi-fi areas for $9.95/mo for unlimited local and long distance— see http://www.line2.com

    2) Using cell/3-4G frequencies outside wi-fi areas (in my car, etc) on the same smart phone as used at home— toll-free in-/out-bound calling adds $5/mo (for “Line2Pro”)

    David Pogue (NY Times) evaluated and lavished praise on Line2/Line2Pro ~2yrs ago, saying “phone company CEOs will be losing sleep” over this. Regarding redundancy: If my wi-fi, isp, power, etc fail (as in severe storms) I simply use the cell/3-4G frequencies (switchover is automatic)*. For extended power outages, I keep a spare fully-charged battery for the smart phone; also, both of my cars have adapters to power the phone on the road (or in my driveway). Its GREAT to save so much money while still having two dissimilar means of communicating by telephone, normally & in emergencies!

    *I live near Orlando, which suffered 3 severe hurricanes in August 2004 —cell frequencies and my cell phone worked perfectly throughout all 3 storms and the resulting extended power outages


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    Oct 20th, 2012 (10:42 am)

    MrEnergyCzar: Keep the land line along with another way to communicate. Always have multiple ways to do the same thing…. it’s communication insurance.

    Land lines are going to disappear. They lose more market share every year. If no one is paying for them, the companies are not going to keep/maintain them.


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    Oct 20th, 2012 (10:45 am)

    OT: On my way to Ann Arbor to watch MSU vs UofM. Found an available free charger in the city (according to ChargePoint). Hopefully nobody gets there before me in the next hour or so.

    Captain Jack – you asked about DC quick chargers in the US the other day. If you go to charge point’s website you can filter for just DC quick chargers. Wow, there’s A LOT in Chicago. I don’t have time to grab a screen shot of the map, so you’ll have to wander over to the site.


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    Oct 20th, 2012 (1:20 pm)

    kdawg: Land lines are going to disappear.They lose more market share every year.If no one is paying for them, the companies are not going to keep/maintain them.

    There will still be a hard line to most houses for awhile longer but it may only be the cable line or some form of high speed data line. Analog lines and those originally run for analog purpose will fade away.


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    Oct 20th, 2012 (4:54 pm)

    Seeings how oil has quadrupled in price in the last decade or so, to think that oil prices could double again in another 10 years is certainly not out of the realm of possibility. It all depends on growth of developing countries and their per capita oil use. If oil production can’t keep up for whatever reason, an inelastic commodity like oil, the economy crumbling is the only possible outcome. Nobody gets that though, there’s too many other problems to put blame on, and rightfully so in most or all cases, but cheap oil covers a multitude of sins, just ask Bill Clinton.


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    Oct 20th, 2012 (6:35 pm)

    We can predict with certainty that oil will get more expensive in future. Those noveau rich folks in developing countries such as china, Brazil, India and many others etc owning a car is symbol of status and wealth which need to be displayed. It is not necessaity for many but cars are being sold by the millions. In these countries the roadway structure is terrible but that does not disuade these folks to buy cars. If one can walk faster than drive what is the purpose of car?

    US need to get ahead of this oil price curve and make the efforts now to switch to EV (all sorts) before oil prices real hits us hard. Now is the time to move to alternate energy sources and move to EV including heavy trucks like VIA etc. In 20-30 years we will be smiling with deep cuts in our oil consumption and the these developing countries (BRIC) looking for high priced oil.

    Alas our politicians are driven by the short term results rather than what is good for the country on a longer horizon. Folks forget what happened in Gulf (a distant memory now) and we want to drill in Alaska? Give me a break!


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    Oct 20th, 2012 (9:25 pm)

    Suddenly now deficits are in vogue as the GOP says. It was no problem since 2000 when we started a war in Iraq for no reason and spent trillions with a T on that war. For what I ma ask? Then took the eye away from Afghanistan where the fight was essential. That led to a even longer war now. Folks get amnesia especially on right when VP Cheney said that defcits dont matter and today they do. What a joke it is!
    GOP only position is work hard make $5/hr and work 3 jobs to make ends meet…And yes those top 2% they worked very hard to deserve the trillions in tax cuts. yes I got $300. last time I recall Bush gutted the SEC and wall st took advantage of that and led to economic crisis. GS CEO said they are doing GODs work and paid millions in fine lately for the mortgage bundling and heaped pain on the homeowners.


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    Oct 21st, 2012 (9:13 am)

    kdawg: Land lines are going to disappear.They lose more market share every year.If no one is paying for them, the companies are not going to keep/maintain them.

    AT&T is going VoIP. I switched my number to a magic jack at $2/month. Their bundled VoIP service is $42!


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    Oct 21st, 2012 (9:43 am)

    kdawg: OT: On my way to Ann Arbor to watch MSU vs UofM. Found an available free charger in the city (according to ChargePoint). Hopefully nobody gets there before me in the next hour or so.

    Update: got to the ChargePoint stations yesterday. A big truck and a Cadillac Escalade had both spots taken. I asked if they could move, and basically got told “nope”. Fortunately, there was as public parking deck 1 block away that had free charges on the first level. Sweet!


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    Oct 21st, 2012 (9:45 am)

    Koz,

    Loboc,

    As wireless gets better & better, eventually cable TV/interet/VoIP will disappear. This may take 25+ years. We’ll see. You can already get satellite TV so one-way communication over cable is already obsolete.


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    Oct 21st, 2012 (2:33 pm)

    Interesting discussion on landlines, VOIP and wireless. Any suggestions to get good wireless basic service and drop the landline? Last I recall Magic jack was not that cheap. Any link to that $2/mo service? I will goggle it meanwhile.

    Looking to change my wireless provider to new one and basic cell plan with text/no text etc. Wud appreciate any suggestions… Thank you


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    Oct 21st, 2012 (4:57 pm)

    Pat: Any suggestions to get good wireless basic service and drop the landline? Last I recall Magic jack was not that cheap. Any link to that $2/mo service? I will goggle it meanwhile.

    Looking to change my wireless provider to new one and basic cell plan with text/no text etc. Wud appreciate any suggestions… Thank you

    I’m VERY happy with the approach I describe in my post #48 above. It uses AT&T as my cell phone provider & Line2 (see http://www.line2.com ) as my voip service. For only $9.95/mo Line2 provides full redundancy, saves me over $100/mo for landline + cell service & works better than either!


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    Oct 21st, 2012 (5:53 pm)

    Pat,

    Depends on a lot of things.

    Do you have an internet provider already?
    Do they offer VoIP?
    Do you have a cell phone already?
    Who’s the provider and how good is their coverage?
    How many minutes/month do you talk?
    How much data usage do you need?


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    Oct 21st, 2012 (9:21 pm)

    kdawg: People don’t just adopt new technology.Look how long hybrids have been around and how little market share they have.And those really aren’t any different than a normal car.There’s a lot of FUD to go around, on top of old-school mentality.Even if EV’s magically overcame all the obstacles/excuses for not buying one overnight, tomorrow at the dealer’s lot, many people would still buy a gas car.It’s going to take word of mouth, and exposure, to reach a level of trust where people don’t think twice about buying an EV.

    This only covers the “new technology” aspect.There’s also a social stigma attached to EVs.This image needs to be shaken before mass adoption. That’s just how I see it, and my experience answering questions from strangers.

    the problem with hybrids is not the technology; the problem is that hybrids are a lot more expensive than the non-hybrid equivalents, yet, in some cars the hybrids only offers a few mpg improvement over the non-hybrid version.

    i don’t know anything about this “social stigma attached to EVs” stuff that you are writing about…


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    Oct 21st, 2012 (9:25 pm)

    Loboc:

    Most people don’t care what size engine they have or if it is electric or poop-powered. They just get in and drive (while talking on the phone, putting on makeup, and eating). I don’t see a major hurdle just a slight change in how it gets fueled. Heck, my wife hasn’t put gas in her car for over 10 years. It just automagically gets filled on the weekend. (guess who).

    this statement is not true, there are a lot of uncertainties about electric vehicles – some of them are legitimate. there is a long history of people keeping gasoline powered vehicles for decades. with electric vehicles, who knows?


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    Oct 21st, 2012 (9:34 pm)

    kdawg: It would be interesting in a hypothetical near-future, where electricity is free, recharges take the same time as fueling a gas car, and electric cars cost the same as gas cars and have the same performance.How many people would still drive gas cars?I think we would be surprised how many still would.I think that speaks to the core hurdle that EV’s face.It’s not just cost, or pollution, or recharge times, etc…there’s a whole gasoline culture that needs to be overcome.

    EDIT: An example I was going to give was the telephone.My parents have cell phones, but refuse to give up their land line.I have a cell phone, grew up with land lines, but ditched mine around the year 2000.My niece & nephew have cell phones, and they barely know what a land line is.

    the hypothetical that you propose is a pipe dream: electricity will never be free, and electric charging times equal to those of a gasoline fill up are not as simple as you might think. one of the reasons that chevrolet limited the recharge rate on the volt was concerns that fast charging rates can degrade the battery.

    but to live in the present, the various uncertainties about electric cars is the reason why i would buy a chevrolet volt but would not buy a BEV like a tesla or leaf. i kept my last car for 12 years and don’t like the idea of a car that might have a lifetime of less than 10 years. i also don’t like the idea of being shut down for hours to recharge if i run low on battery charge. think about it: even if you bought a tesla with the greatest battery capacity, and took off for a weekend trip from chicago to st. louis. when you get to your destination you will probably only have access to a 120v outlet, in which case, you will probably have to leave your car in st. louis at the end of the weekend and take the amtrak train back to chicago and use mass transit for the following week and then go back down to st. louis the next weekend to retrieve your car. such a thing would not happen with a conventional car or one that had a gasoline powered source available.


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    Oct 21st, 2012 (9:46 pm)

    MrEnergyCzar:
    I want to thank Jeff for the great article.As mentioned above, sharing the video or article is a great way for Volt members here to spread the message…..

    this video is in some respects like the gospel of st. john; it’s preaching to the already converted. i mean, do you really think that you are getting “free” electricity from your solar panel? unless you stole the thing, you are probably in the middle of getting payback from the cash outlaid to install it.

    that isn’t to say that the solar panel is a bad idea, it really speaks to the important (i would say vital) role that the government has to play in making the electrification of transportation viable. i think that it is good that the government has (for this year) extended subsidies for charging stations. i think that there should be even more subsidies for installation of solar panels and those subsidies should be offset by increases in federal taxes on gasoline to steer people toward electric transportation. president obama is correct in that this country should be at the vanguard of electrified transportation. after all, without government subsidies in the 1960′s and 1970′s, we would not have the internet today. one reason why europe is so far ahead of the U.S. when it comes to energy efficient building products is because of tougher building codes and higher taxes on energy that steer people into buying more energy efficient products. this in turn reinforces the development of industries to supply those products.

    of course this is all pie in the sky in today’s U.S. government which is so bogged down by republican obstructionism that it is not possible to do any long term planning. add to that an american public, including teabaggers, who are so mired in “me, me, my, my” mentality that many don’t want to pay taxes to invest in anything unless it benefits them personally, today.


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    Oct 21st, 2012 (10:57 pm)

    no comment: i don’t know anything about this “social stigma attached to EVs” stuff that you are writing about…

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JiUcNGAJMSw

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ef-YWyG5TXw

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOvp69lnZbA


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    Oct 21st, 2012 (11:02 pm)

    no comment: the hypothetical that you propose is a pipe dream

    Do you understand the definition of “hypothetical”?


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    Oct 22nd, 2012 (3:23 am)

    kdawg: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JiUcNGAJMSw

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ef-YWyG5TXw

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOvp69lnZbA

    what you have presented is not persuasive evidence of a “social stigma”. i mean, really? do you think that the target demographic for the chevrolet volt (or any electric/hybrid car) is the viewers of “south park”? and your presenting of an opinion of some british guy that nobody here has every heard of? gotta be kidding…


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    Oct 22nd, 2012 (3:25 am)

    kdawg: Do you understand the definition of “hypothetical”?

    there are hypotheticals that have some prospect of being realized; there are others that don’t. the latter tends to fall in the category of pipe dreams…


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    Oct 22nd, 2012 (8:33 am)

    no comment: what you have presented is not persuasive evidence of a “social stigma”. i mean, really? do you think that the target demographic for the chevrolet volt (or any electric/hybrid car) is the viewers of “south park”? and your presenting of an opinion of some british guy that nobody here has every heard of? gotta be kidding…

    If you don’t know that hybrids (& now EV’s) are perceived *differently* than normal cars, then I think you have been living under a rock. Even Bob Lutz joked about using a Volt for picking up girls with more hair on their legs. FYI, I watch South Park and I own a Volt. So does the other Volt owner I work with. I’m not sure who you think is out of the South Park demographic, maybe senior citizens, but I know a few of those who laugh at it as well. The “some British guy” is Jeremy Clarkson, who co-hosts the most popular car show in the world, Top Gear. I wouldn’t trivialize the opinions coming out of his mouth, not because they are the truth, but because he has a HUGE audience/influence. There’s millions of examples of pop culture poking fun at hybrids & EV’s. However I believe the tide is finally starting to change. IMO, It started with White Lighting beating ICE cars at drag races. Now we have Telsa first with the roadster now with the Model S, also Fisker. These are cars which fight the stigma. Also the Volt, with its sporty looks, instant torque, and top speed of 100mph is going against the grain. Once more “joe the plumbers” buy these kinds of cars, they will become more accepted as *equals*.


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    Nov 5th, 2012 (8:44 pm)

    I participated in a big car show, Automobilia, in Wichita, KS last July. The oldest car at the show was a 1918 electric car. Detroit Electric, I think, not Baker like Jay Leno has.