May 23

Countdown: One Month to Tesla Model S Blast Off

 

Tesla Motors has shown a talent for creating enthusiasm with lavish parties, personally written blogs, and an overall sense of imparting to its prospective customers that it is all about them.

Company founder Elon Musk must be flying high, having yesterday seen his separate SpaceX company successfully launch its historical first Falcon 9 rocket carrying a Dragon spacecraft to orbit – and in unrelated news, one month from now on June 22, Tesla Motors is preparing to blast off its first Model S deliveries.

 

Yesterday, Tesla Communications Manager Shanna Hendriks told us the first 1,200 cars delivered will be top-of-the-range Signature Series 85-kwh models, and in all Tesla counts over 10,000 pre-orders for all variants including 60 kwh and 40 kwh.

Although Musk’s car and spacecraft operations are separate entities, the latest news according to an Enthusiasts blog post yesterday spoke of a “countdown” to this the Model S launch with tidbits about how personalization will be carried all the way to regenerative braking, steering, and suspension.

“I’d like to share a few Model S updates that again underscore how personalized YOUR Model S can be. Model S can be adjusted exactly the way YOU like it,” Blankenship wrote.

On the Model S 17-inch touchscreen, drivers can select from a menu that gives a high degree of individualization.

Adjustable Regen

Regenerative braking – not in itself unique – can be tailored on Model S for greater or less feeling of resistance when the driver’s foot is off the accelerator.

“We listened to your requests and I’m pleased to announce that Model S Regen will be adjustable. You can adjust Regen to suit your driving style,” he wrote. “Some owners like a little more resistance, some like a little less. Having less Regen means you will likely get less range, but some people still prefer the feel of their car with less Regen.”

Adjustable Steering

Beyond personalized regen, the automaker is offering a choice between “Comfort, Standard and Sport” steering.

The vehicle has speed sensitive, variable-ratio rack and pinion steering with electric assist.

“It’s allowing you to adjust the torque, based on driver preference. For example, the Comfort setting is very little torque. It is controlled through electric power steering.” Hendriks said.

Adjustable Suspension

As shown on the center stack touch screen, suspension can be electrically selected from a menu of VERY HIGH, HIGH, STANDARD, LOW, AND JACK – the recommended position for towing.

The Model S uses an Active Air Suspension, with some general details about it from Tesla’s Web site as follows:

Active Air Suspension Everyday advantages combine with on-demand features. Active Air Suspension automatically and continuously responds to speed and road conditions. As Model S accelerates, it lowers the vehicle for optimized aerodynamics and increased range. Raise and lower Model S using the touchscreen to traverse thick snow and enter extremely steep driveways. Much more than just a great ride and handling package.

Stoking the Flames

A phrase we’ve seen a few times already from Tesla’s marketers is “exceeded expectations.” The company says it has exceeded expectations in range and cold weather performance, and in general this seems to be a theme it would like show it has carried through in every way.

The Model S line starting at just below $50,000 to just around $100,000 is not inexpensive however, so what is expected and what really exceeds expectations could be debated, as the company is otherwise raising expectations for itself aiming to create the impression of a pampered experience for its customers.

As Musk is literally doing in his space endeavors, his terrestrially oriented company is likewise metaphorically shooting for the stars in its gambit to launch a new car company that since discontinuing its Roadster, has gone a few months with no current deliverable models, but it will be back at it again in another month.

The LA Times yesterday quoted Morgan Stanley which forecast deliveries of nearly 3,000 Model S cars this year, 16,000 in 2013, and 19,000 in 2014.

 

This came as news to Hendriks, who said the Palo Alto-based company expects to deliver 5,000 this year, but she said she was unable to divulge forecasts for subsequent years.

In any event, compared to its closes competitor, Fisker Automotive, Tesla appears to be hitting on a better stride as it moves with fewer problems and more chutzpah to propel itself into orbit as a bona fide U.S. based automaker, albeit with still more left to actually prove.

This entry was posted on Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012 at 5:55 am and is filed under General. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

COMMENTS: 39


  1. 1
    WVhybrid

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    May 23rd, 2012 (7:15 am)

    Congratulations to Tesla. I wish them all the best success.


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    May 23rd, 2012 (7:44 am)

    Tesla is going full steam ahead. No timid roll out of a few cars for the first year then slow ramp up. They have to take this route because they do not have any other models to generate income. But it is somewhat risky, what if they have a massive re-call like the Fisker battery issue? None the less I admire them and they are already selling the Model X. Meanwhile GM has not announced any Voltec variants. Make the commitment GM, bring out SUV and crossover variants. With more models to choose from you will reach a wider consumer base and at the same time make more people comfortable with buying this new technology.


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    May 23rd, 2012 (7:56 am)

    Speaking of Fisker… they have often stated that they have 5000 orders in hand. Anybody know how many have been delivered, or if the 5000 is a real figure? I think their production rate was about 1500 per month, so they should have been able to manufacturer close to 5k by now, but then again production may have been slowed down because of motor and battery problems.


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    Skotty

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    May 23rd, 2012 (8:39 am)

    I love that the Model S has adjustable ride height — not just a toy, this feature could be very helpful with maintenance and navigating nasty driveway entrances and exits, among other things, while still allowing for a low height when highway cruising.

    I’m curious about the quote regarding regen setting. I don’t see why there would be any concern over reduced regen reducing range. This would seem to indicate one of three things: either the Tesla braking control is more primitive than other manufacturers and the regen is actually reduced (rather than remapping pedal control), or Blankenship was suggesting the average driver will just make less efficient use of the regen (though I think that is just picking nits), or he was simply mistaken.

    Following the Roadster, I’m really impressed with the Model S. If the Model S is free from major problems (cross fingers!), I think it will solidify Tesla as a real and respected auto manufacturer rather than just a niche company.


  5. 5
    kdawg

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    May 23rd, 2012 (8:45 am)

    “We listened to your requests and I’m pleased to announce that Model S Regen will be adjustable. You can adjust Regen to suit your driving style.
    ———-

    Same as putting the Volt in “L”


  6. 6
    kdawg

     

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    May 23rd, 2012 (8:51 am)

    The Model S uses an Active Air Suspension, with some general details about it from Tesla’s Web site as follows:

    Active Air Suspension Everyday advantages combine with on-demand features. Active Air Suspension automatically and continuously responds to speed and road conditions. As Model S accelerates, it lowers the vehicle for optimized aerodynamics and increased range. Raise and lower Model S using the touchscreen to traverse thick snow and enter extremely steep driveways. Much more than just a great ride and handling package.

    ————–

    Why didn’t they use a Magnetoheological fluid shock? It is an EV after all. Is there a way to combine mag-shocks w/adjustable height?

    Mag shocks is what you find in a lot of GM vehicles (Cadillac, Corvette, etc) and now other companies more luxury brand cars.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetorheological_fluid


  7. 7
    George S. Bower

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    May 23rd, 2012 (8:58 am)

    This is great news. I love the S. and also am ecstatic about the space X flight

    Did you guys know that:

    Scotty’s (James Doohan of Star Trek fame) ashes were on the flight!!

    It’s true:

    http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/2012/5/22/star_trek_scottys_ashes_beamed_up.htm


  8. 8
    Mark Z

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    May 23rd, 2012 (9:36 am)

    The regen selection is great news as I expressed my concern last year during several events. The reason for concern was simple, the Volt had spoiled me with the luxury of selecting “D” or “L”. A salesperson who took my Volt for a test ride told me that the Roadster had a set regen with a Volt like “L” all the time. Only when the Volt was in Sport Mode and “L” did it feel more Roadster like during the test ride.

    I explained that having the choice of “D” or “L” on the freeway is important when driving at faster speeds. It’s a waste of power to lift your foot off the accelerator and slow down when all you wanted was an ICE like engine retard at highway speed. As long as Tesla applies regen when first hitting the break pedal, energy issues should be minor. The default setting will be best in heavy traffic, around town or mountain roads.

    While I’d rather have a lever to adjust the regen, the ability to decrease it by accessing the center screen on longer trips will be appreciated. A handy button to access two or three driver selected preset levels would be the ideal. GM made the right choice by engineering the regen change using the floor mounted gear selector. Considering that Tesla left that area of the vehicle between the front seats empty in recent beta vehicles, they do have room for the floor shifter. The customers would probably vote for cup holders instead.

    By the way, George Blankenship attends the events and loves to hear the customers ideas. Tesla engineers attend the major events and get feedback as well. This personal touch is why so many user requests are engineered into the vehicle. Some concerns may not be addressed (like the absence of extended foot space to the left of the break pedal) but Tesla is listening and doing what they can to improve Model S. I look forward to what George and the engineers come up with when mounting the front license plate on Model S. Our discussion at Fashion Island may encourage some unique solutions. We will just have to wait for the production models appearing soon!


  9. 9
    MTN Ranger

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    May 23rd, 2012 (9:38 am)

    Hopefully, we can see a lot of the advanced Model S features will be offered in the Cadillac ELR. It would appear the variable regen is a lot more advanced and customizable than just putting the Volt in L.


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    stuart22

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    May 23rd, 2012 (10:16 am)

    Tesla Model S is the only pure EV sedan I’d consider owning. I wish them all the success they need to survive and prosper. There’s plenty of room in the market for a Tesla to do well, and I do believe a successful Tesla will help all EV/EREVs prosper just as the Volt doing well in sales helps open things up for other success stories to emerge.

    Such as perhaps, the Tesla Model S.


  11. 11
    Victor C

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    May 23rd, 2012 (10:25 am)

    Congratulations to Telsa. A successful Model S will also increase awareness of the Volt and the entire EV sector. Bring on the ELR.


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    May 23rd, 2012 (10:44 am)

    Good luck to Tesla. With new EVs from Ford, Toyota and others due this year, we should see more competition and lower prices in a few years.


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    Steve

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    May 23rd, 2012 (11:06 am)

    That’s interesting, but it’s even more expensive than the Volt. Even further out of my price range.


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    Noel Park

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    May 23rd, 2012 (11:21 am)

    kdawg:
    “We listened to your requests and I’m pleased to announce that Model S Regen will be adjustable. You can adjust Regen to suit your driving style.
    ———-

    Same as putting the Volt in “L”

    #5

    Bingo! +1


  15. 15
    Noel Park

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    May 23rd, 2012 (11:23 am)

    Steve:
    That’s interesting, but it’s even more expensive than the Volt.Even further out of my price range.

    #13

    It’s not going to lure me out of my Volt any time soon, LOL. +1

    Sorry Elon, but EREV is the answer at this point in our history.


  16. 16
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    May 23rd, 2012 (11:43 am)

    The LA Times yesterday quoted Morgan Stanley which forecast deliveries of nearly 3,000 Model S cars this year, 16,000 in 2013, and 19,000 in 2014.
    This came as news to Hendriks, who said the Palo Alto-based company expects to deliver 5,000 this year, but she said she was unable to divulge forecasts for subsequent years.

    ————-

    2012 seems doable, but those 2013 & 2014 #’s seem high to me, especially if we look at the Leaf & Volt #’s (and these are vehicles coming from established car companies). I think there will be the initial surge for the Tesla S, but after that it will be slow sales due to the price. If the price comes down, sales will increase, but the same goes for all the over EV’s that are competing for this segment.

    Just what my crystal ball is saying.


  17. 17
    Noel Park

     

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    May 23rd, 2012 (11:56 am)

    kdawg: Just what my crystal ball is saying.

    #16

    Makes sense to me. +1


  18. 18
    Jeff Michaud

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    May 23rd, 2012 (12:06 pm)

    lol, come in for a view after over a year and same old crap from some of the same old folks like “sorry elon but erev is the answer at this point in our history”, still see EV’s and the world as black or white with and not a rainbow of colors.

    there’s plenty of room in the market, and as the pre-orders for the Model S show, never mind the Nissan LEAF which is already selling, for pure BEV’s. Hell if everyone needs/desires were all the same we’d only have one auto maker that would build/sell only one model.

    In any case I’m finally in the market for a new car (my volvo will turn 13 later this year, still runs great but T5′s require high test and lucky if I get 25mpg), and would love to get a plug-in (I’ve test drove the Volt and the plug-in version of the Prius), obviously can’t test drive a Tesla S yet (and probably not even after the launch?)… biggest problem checking my research however is….

    I’m essentially retired so no income, my investments are mostly long term (not high dividend paying) stocks, and just found out the “up to” $7,500 is a NON-refundable tax credit… so unless you have a close or above $7,500 tax liability I’ll essentially be paying $7,500 more than most folks for a Volt or other plug-in. Anyone know a way around this? I may be stuck waiting til enough Volt’s, etc plug-ins are sold that the tax credit goes away and the MSRP drops accordingly (but even then it looks like the credit is phased out over 2 years).

    I may just end up having to buy a non-plugin hybrid :(


  19. 19
    Jackson

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    May 23rd, 2012 (12:34 pm)

    With a lot of battery fire screed floating around, I wonder if “blast off” is the kind of imagery they should be evoking …


  20. 20
    Kickincanada

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    May 23rd, 2012 (12:49 pm)

    I recently saw a Model S in Ottawa Canada (see my thread below). Like the first time I saw the Volt, the Model S exceeded my expectations and I think the price point is very competitive for what you get. I would be tempted to buy this over a Cadillac ELR

    http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?7649-OFFICIAL-CANADIAN-VOLT-THREAD&p=148478#post148478


  21. 21
    Kent

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    May 23rd, 2012 (1:00 pm)

    Jeff Michaud:
    lol, come in for a view after over a year and same old crap from some of the same old folks like “sorry elon but erev is the answer at this point in our history”, still see EV’s and the world as black or white with and not a rainbow of colors.

    there’s plenty of room in the market, and as the pre-orders for the Model S show, never mind the Nissan LEAF which is already selling, for pure BEV’s.Hell if everyone needs/desires were all the same we’d only have one auto maker that would build/sell only one model.

    In any case I’m finally in the market for a new car (my volvo will turn 13 later this year, still runs great but T5′s require high test and lucky if I get 25mpg), and would love to get a plug-in (I’ve test drove the Volt and the plug-in version of the Prius), obviously can’t test drive a Tesla S yet (and probably not even after the launch?)… biggest problem checking my research however is….

    I’m essentially retired so no income, my investments are mostly long term (not high dividend paying) stocks, and just found out the “up to” $7,500 is a NON-refundable tax credit… so unless you have a close or above $7,500 tax liability I’ll essentially be paying $7,500 more than most folks for a Volt or other plug-in.Anyone know a way around this?I may be stuck waiting til enough Volt’s, etc plug-ins are sold that the tax credit goes away and the MSRP drops accordingly (but even then it looks like the credit is phased out over 2 years).

    I may just end up having to buy a non-plugin hybrid

    Have you considered leasing your Volt? You’ll benefit with lower monthly payments due to the leasing company taking the tax credit. You can then buy your Volt when your lease term is over.


  22. 22
    kdawg

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    May 23rd, 2012 (1:09 pm)

    Jeff Michaud: I’ll essentially be paying $7,500 more than most folks for a Volt or other plug-in. Anyone know a way around this?

    Lease a Volt. (or buy a used one)


  23. 23
    volt11

     

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    May 23rd, 2012 (1:10 pm)

    The S is such a complex car compared to their initial Roadster, it will be very interesting to see how well they pull it off in terms of quality. I hope they do well, I recently bought some of their stock!

    I would consider a Tesla S if and when: A) I can afford it, B) initial quality reports are good, C) I like it on a test drive, and D) Tesla installs some of their superchargers along I-95 in the northeast corridor. But an improved Volt / ELR with longer range and quieter ICE operation would probably keep me with GM. Like it or not, Tesla is still a start-up automaker (and we all know how that usually goes) and buying one is a gamble.


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    jeffhre

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    May 23rd, 2012 (1:13 pm)

    Jeff Michaud,

    Kent: Have you considered leasing your Volt?You’ll benefit with lower monthly payments due to the leasing company taking the tax credit.You can then buy your Volt when your lease term is over.

    Jeff,
    Would you consider “unretiring” yourself for a few years and writing off all of your expenses, including a leased car, as business costs?


  25. 25
    nasaman

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    May 23rd, 2012 (1:31 pm)

    Noel Park: Sorry Elon, but EREV is the answer at this point in our history.

    Ditto for me too, Noel! I’ll explain by relating a story from a different blog posted yesterday…

    An engineer who owns a Volt decided to, in his own words, “run out of gas on purpose just to see how far it would take me, not far enough. Got about 3 miles at 65mph. (So I bought a gas can for the next time when I run out…)”

    I responded as follows: “The Volt’s design is unique in that it employs ‘dissimilar redundancy’ (the most powerful kind), much like we attempt to do when possible in the space program & UNLIKE ANY OTHER CAR. If you deliberately discharge the battery THEN try to drive on an empty tank, sorry, but it’s your own fault!!! ALWAYS keep a couple gallons of gas in the tank — gas degrades much less in the Volt’s sealed, pressurized tank than in an external gas can!”

    The following comment expands on my thoughts regarding the Model S or ANY other “pure” EV…


  26. 26
    nasaman

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    May 23rd, 2012 (1:32 pm)

    Here’s why I’m convinced “pure” EV’s just don’t make sense…

    1) The only major technical flaw in GM’s EV-1 was not its lead-acid or (later) its NMh batteries —it was that drivers didn’t have a back-up energy source, so they lacked the freedom to extend any given trip, however important, to beyond the car’s maximum range.

    2) ICE cars and “pure” EVs have the lack of any redundancy as a common flaw of both architectures. For example, if your fan belt fails in an ICE, you’ll soon be disabled even if you have a full gas tank. [Yesterday's Falcon 9 launch would have been at a much greater risk of failure if virtually all critical systems had not been redundant.]

    3) At today’s costs and foreseeable battery costs, an EREV’s generator can be manufactured at a comparable (if not lower) cost than the battery it replaces. IOW, the Leaf’s enlarged battery adds close to the same cost to a Leaf as the Volt’s generator adds to a Volt. And I believe Lotus and others have already shown an EREV generator’s can be reduced to significantly below present costs.


  27. 27
    Raymondjram

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    May 23rd, 2012 (2:14 pm)

    nasaman,

    Your idea of redundancy made me laugh. If you lived 100 years ago, you would have a horse tied to the rear bumper of your “automobile” in case the engine would fail or would not start. Then you would tie the horse to the front bumper to pull the automobile home. I remember seeing pictures of those old vehicles being pulled by horses, especialy when they broke down out on old roads!

    Redundancy is costly, and limited to what is practical. The Volt has two power sources because it was designed as a EREV, which is first an EV with a ICE for extra power when the battery discharges. If the electric motor fails, your ICE could not move your Volt, so you don’t have redundancy there. Maybe some of the parallel hybrids do have redundancy with two power sources driving the wheels.

    The only redundancy I have in my ICE vehices is the spare tire.

    If you still want redundancy for your Volt, use your contacts to buy a solid-fuel rocket engine, attach it to the trunk, and fire it up when your Volt dies. ; – )

    Have fun but be safe!

    Raymond


  28. 28
    Logical_Thinker

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    May 23rd, 2012 (2:53 pm)

    Wow, some of you gurus on the Volt Forum are becoming remarkably anti-EV. Y’all, keep in mind that if Tesla flops, it is going to have at least a bit of a ripple effect.

    But furthermore, the reality is that some people would like to not have all that extra complexity of a gas powered generator. And for some people, a range over ~150 miles is truly never EVER needed.

    Like me. The farthest I’m going to DRIVE is to Orlando (from down here near Miami). Beyond that I’m flying and renting a car.


  29. 29
    kdawg

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    May 23rd, 2012 (5:41 pm)

    Logical_Thinker: Wow, some of you gurus on the Volt Forum are becoming remarkably anti-EV. Y’all, keep in mind that if Tesla flops, it is going to have at least a bit of a ripple effect.
    But furthermore, the reality is that some people would like to not have all that extra complexity of a gas powered generator. And for some people, a range over ~150 miles is truly never EVER needed.
    Like me. The farthest I’m going to DRIVE is to Orlando (from down here near Miami). Beyond that I’m flying and renting a car.

    Not sure who you’re referring to, but I’m not anti-EV. I think they are a great 2nd car. I don’t think they will work as most people’s only mode of transportation. Even if you only drive short distances, at some point you are going to have to make multiple trips in a day, and won’t have time for a recharge. What happens if you forget to plug in? What happens if the power goes out? How do you get to work in the morning? All of these concerns have been discussed before (among others), but they are worth mentioning again. I would love to have an EV if I was in a 2-car family (preferably where the 2nd car was a Volt). However I won’t buy one as my sole source of transportation until it can go 300 miles per charge, at 70mph, with the heater/ac on, and recharge in under 1hr. We are not there yet. I have kept my eye on the electric motorcycle market though.


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    koz

     

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    May 23rd, 2012 (6:07 pm)

    Jeff Michaud:

    I’m essentially retired so no income, my investments are mostly long term (not high dividend paying) stocks, and just found out the “up to” $7,500 is a NON-refundable tax credit… so unless you have a close or above $7,500 tax liability I’ll essentially be paying $7,500 more than most folks for a Volt or other plug-in.Anyone know a way around this?I may be stuck waiting til enough Volt’s, etc plug-ins are sold that the tax credit goes away and the MSRP drops accordingly (but even then it looks like the credit is phased out over 2 years).

    I may just end up having to buy a non-plugin hybrid

    You would have to consult your accountant to verify but if you have a traditional IRA there may be a way. IRA funds become taxable when you withdraw them (unless it is a ROTH IRA). If you have enough liquid assets, withdraw enough to create a $7500 tax liability that you can them take the full credit. The only downside is if the funds are then put in investments outside of your IRA, their capital gains then become taxable.


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    stuart22

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    May 23rd, 2012 (6:11 pm)

    nasaman:
    Here’s why I’m convinced “pure” EV’s just don’t make sense…

    drivers ….. lack freedom to extend any given trip, however important, to beyond the car’s maximum range.

    This fact kills the market potential for pure BEVs. Every trip taken in a BEV has a point of no return – exceed it at your own peril. Tesla mitigates this issue with longer ranges than other BEVs of today. Combine that with extremely attractive styling, high tech features and roomy comfort, and you’ve got a BEV that could very easily tip the scales for people who can afford one.


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    koz

     

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    May 23rd, 2012 (6:14 pm)

    kdawg: Not sure who you’re referring to, but I’m not anti-EV.I think they are a great 2nd car.I don’t think they will work as most people’s only mode of transportation.Even if you only drive short distances, at some point you are going to have to make multiple trips in a day, and won’t have time for a recharge.What happens if you forget to plug in?What happens if the power goes out?How do you get to work in the morning?All of these concerns have been discussed before (among others), but they are worth mentioning again.I would love to have an EV if I was in a 2-car family (preferably where the 2nd car was a Volt).However I won’t buy one as my sole source of transportation until it can go 300 miles per charge, at 70mph, with the heater/ac on, and recharge in under 1hr.We are not there yet.I have kept my eye on the electric motorcycle market though.

    While it may be true that “most” people currently “think” they need more range in their primary car than a 40KWh battery provides but in reality “most” do not. As more EV’s are on the road and experienced first hand, more people will realize this. It’s not much different than the realization that the Volt needs from the general consumer about how many electric miles they will be able to drive in a year with a 40 mile EREV and how much savings goes along with that. Besides a large portion of the $35+K automotive customer base has more than one car per household. I would bet that the percentage of drivers that drive their own car more than 240 miles on trips more than 4 times per year is below 25%.


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    Noel Park

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    May 23rd, 2012 (6:15 pm)

    kdawg: Not sure who you’re referring to, but I’m not anti-EV.

    #29

    I think that they’re referring to me because of my remark about Elon above. Obviously, I agree with you. +1

    I don’t think that BEVs are going to do much, given the current state of public charging facilities. Maybe someday………….. If people want to buy Teslas, God love them. More jobs and less pollution in CA, how can that be bad? I’m just saying that GM learned the stark reality of “range anxiety” better than anyone from their EV1 experience.

    IMHO EREV has a lot better chance of selling a lot of cars than does BEV, at least for some failly lengthy interim period. To every one who buys a BEV, especially a made in USA Tesla, my hat is off to you. You all are truly leaders, and I honor you for it.


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    May 23rd, 2012 (6:40 pm)

    koz: While it may be true that “most” people currently “think” they need more range in their primary car than a 40KWh battery provides but in reality “most” do not.

    As your only mode of transportation 40kwh isn’t enough. That could be as low as 60 miles on very hot/cold day. Which means you can’t go further than a 30 mile radius from your house. And you would need a full recharge to do a 2nd similar trip.

    Even though the average daily mileage is 40 miles or less for 80% of the population, that is just an average, and that is just 80%. What about the 10 to 20 times a year you want to drive to a nearby city (where you can’t plug in)? What about the days you have to make 20 errands? I don’t think everyone want’s to mess w/renting a car. Also, if your power is out for a few days, you’re screwed.

    EV’s are great daily commuters, but I would want a backup car. Right now I don’t plan on owning 2 cars, so it’s EREV for me.


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    JoMo25

     

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    May 23rd, 2012 (7:36 pm)

    kdawg: As your only mode of transportation 40kwh isn’t enough.That could be as low as 60 miles on very hot/cold day.Which means you can’t go further than a 30 mile radius from your house.And you would need a full recharge to do a 2nd similar trip.

    Even though the average daily mileage is 40 miles or less for 80% of the population, that is just an average, and that is just 80%.What about the 10 to 20 times a year you want to drive to a nearby city (where you can’t plug in)? What about the days you have to make 20 errands? I don’t think everyone want’s to mess w/renting a car.Also, if your power is out for a few days, you’re screwed.

    EV’s are great daily commuters, but I would want a backup car.Right now I don’t plan on owning 2 cars, so it’s EREV for me.

    I agree that currently BEV’s may be not practical for EVERYONE, but they are practical for SOME. And I think companies making full BEVs (including Tesla) realize this. But what Tesla is doing with the Model S is trying to address the primary issues that keeps the SOME from being MANY. By giving range options up to 265 official miles. By providing the capability to charge at 6X the speed of the Volt. By working on a fast charge solution for Interstate travel. Add these up and the limits that keep it SOME start to recede. E.g. The base config will be able to draw 30 miles of range in an hour from a 240V charge station. (An upgrade can double the rate)

    No whether they can spend that much on the car is another factor. But it costs on par with mid-high range BMWs, Audi, MBs, and Lexi (?) and MANY people continue to buy those. (People will knock the price and say its too expensive, but why would count that against the Tesla, but not against those other manufacturers?)


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    May 23rd, 2012 (8:08 pm)

    kdawg: As your only mode of transportation 40kwh isn’t enough.That could be as low as 60 miles on very hot/cold day.Which means you can’t go further than a 30 mile radius from your house.And you would need a full recharge to do a 2nd similar trip.

    Even though the average daily mileage is 40 miles or less for 80% of the population, that is just an average, and that is just 80%.What about the 10 to 20 times a year you want to drive to a nearby city (where you can’t plug in)? What about the days you have to make 20 errands? I don’t think everyone want’s to mess w/renting a car.Also, if your power is out for a few days, you’re screwed.

    EV’s are great daily commuters, but I would want a backup car.Right now I don’t plan on owning 2 cars, so it’s EREV for me.

    If I believed 40KWh battery meant 60 miles on a bad day, I would be inclined to believe you. I don’t think there will be a day in the useful life of the battery that anybody with functioning brain in 95% of the population base will not be able to get 100 miles with minimal or no extraordinary effort. Even that does not draw a hard 50 mile radius around their house but it does mean limitations and Tesla offers larger battery packs for those that travel farther on a regular basis. They Model S pricing gets pretty pricey unless the extra range gets used on a regular basis but they aren’t targeting the frugal car buying segment yet.


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    George S. Bower

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    May 23rd, 2012 (9:50 pm)

    Logical_Thinker:
    Wow, some of you gurus on the Volt Forum are becoming remarkably anti-EV. Y’all, keep in mind that if Tesla flops, it is going to have at least a bit of a ripple effect.

    Totally agree.
    Any anti Tesla discussion should be banned.

    People tend to forget that Elon had a big influence on the Volt’s happening


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    May 23rd, 2012 (10:05 pm)


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    May 24th, 2012 (12:36 am)

    I like the ability to adjust the regen brakes. I think the adjustment should always be in a default mode when you power-on; unless there is a memory setting for personal preferences available. I could see how some people might get surprised by other people changing the regen setting. I would like to humbly suggest having 1 to 3 or 4 brake lights that would activate progressively for: different regen settings and/or with how aggressive you brake. The highest regen setting might for example, trigger 2 of the four brake lights on both sides and medium regen, might only activate the center brake light. As you press the brake pedal; the brake lights would start on the center light and increase in number as you brake and slow down. Essentially the progression of number of brake lights would correlate to the change in vehicle velocity; giving the person behind you a better sense of how quickly your vehicle is slowing down JMO.