Jan 04

GM launches Volt in China

 

General Motors of China will receive its first shipments of an undisclosed number of Chevy Volts for retail deliveries this month.

The vehicles are to be priced at $79,000 (RMB 498,00) and as previously reported, are not eligible for incentives available to buyers of domestically made electric vehicles.

GM has at least for now resisted sharing key details of the Volt’s intellectual property with its joint venture partners that would have been required for its domestic production, and possible incentive eligibility.


The first Chevrolet Volts arrived in China at the HaiTong Port in Shanghai.

The company reported it has already received an initial shipment of 10 Volts at the HaiTong port in Shanghai for a demonstration fleet to be deployed in Beijing, Tianjin and Shanghai.

“This fleet of extended-range electric vehicles will provide consumers as well as ministry leaders, university professors and the media with a chance to experience an industry leading electric vehicle in daily use,” the company said in a statement. “GM will use feedback from the test drives and charging experience to better understand the application of electric vehicles in China and provide consumers with hands on exposure to the extended-range vehicle concept. This is critical, as GM and its joint ventures prepare to expand the offerings of vehicles powered by electricity.”

The company said it will also work closely with government and industry officials to help develop public electric vehicle charging infrastructure.

“China is one of the first global markets where the award-winning Volt will be sold through 13 specially selected dealerships in eight major cities,” GM said.

Specifically, the Volt will be made available in Beijing, Shanghai, Hangzhou, Suzhou, Wuxi, Guangzhou, Shenzhen and Foshan.

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COMMENTS: 45


  1. 1
    Koz

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (6:16 am)

    The fact that the Volt will not receive open market support in China should not go unnoticed by the US government NOR the US population. We MUST wake up and realize that thus far it is a one way street with China. If they cannot play fairly on the international playing field then they should not be allowed to play as unfettered as they are. The US has taken some quid pro quo steps in the past but nothing compared what is being done systemically in China. We must level the playing field or will continue to see our technology stolen, our industries unjustly eroded, and unsafe products sold here without impurnity. It is best addressed on a national level with federal government action but also requires every citizen to take action.

    This first step IMO for this situation is for the atuomobile tax credit programs to be rewritten to exclude autos that are “substantially” maufactured in a country that excludes US manufacturered autos from their own inccentive programs. Of course the rub here will be in defining substantial. IMO, this should be 40% or greater. Coda would be excluded.


  2. 2
    James McQuaid

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (6:59 am)

    Without commenting on trade or politics, I would note that even at $79,000.00, and no incentive, G.M. will sell a *lot* of Volts in China. Chinese consumers love General Motors vehicles.


  3. 3
    James

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (7:08 am)

    It warms my heart to see ( at least some ) American-made, American-engineered, New-tech ingenuitive products make their way into China! Yes, of course our trade deficit is astounding, yes we owe tons of cash in debt to China, and yes, they’ll reverse-engineer Volts to try to steal the goods…
    But seeing those Volts there, and believing perhaps 20,000-50,000 units made here could soon be plying Chinese roads ( perhaps by 2013? ) , turning Chinese heads – does bring a smile to my face.

    Success in the Chinese market could insure an MPV5/Orlando Voltec. 2nd gen Volts most definately will be made in China for the Chinese market. A Buick Volt ( Electra ) seems a no-brainer for them. To me – if GM keeps it’s intellectual rights firmly in hand – it’s all good. Very good.

    VOLT, MORE DRIVE – LESS FILLING!,

    James


  4. 4
    Dan Petit

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (7:21 am)

    It will be interesting to see how the Volt is received in China, and, how the market there responds to it, even given the price there.

    The Chinese can do their own designs for their own electric cars, as they must have millions of technically minded people who demand of themselves some very stringent standards of personal achievement from their own designs if Chinese engineers are allowed to have sufficient flexibility in thinking differently. This is the new goal of doing things in China, to define themselves as a nation of quality manufacturers who do not squander materials on lower life expectancy products. Japan was this way just sixty years ago, and look at Japan just fifty years ago, as their largest national resource was their export labor within small products like high quality cameras at first, then leading up to high quality cars back then, about forty years ago.

    Advancement in technology nowadays is so completely unique, that it is considered pretty technically risky, if not outrightly impossible for anyone to begin to attempt to copy anyone else due to the vast sophistication currently involved in Volt for example.

    Do not at all be surprised that the Chinese will give their engineers far more flexibility in thinking differently to come up with their own completely different electric motoring solutions entirely on their own, once they experience the complete quiet of the Volt drive as the quality standard and the quality goal.

    But enough of their population already feel totally confident in GM quality. And, even though the greatest majority could not afford the current cost of course, costs will diminish in the near future.


  5. 5
    James

     

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (7:22 am)

    One option could be giving the Chinese GM Volt 1st gen rights when the new improved 2nd gen Volt debuts in 2015.

    It’s a compromise I could live with if it means 100s of thousands of GM PHEVs built and sold in China.

    HSD got into Ford and Nissan’s hands via licensing deals a few years after it surfaced yet Toyota continued on improving the tech to the tune of 50 mpg combined Prii and 40 mpg combined 2012 Camry hybrids.

    RECHARGE! ,

    James


  6. 6
    xiaowie1

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (7:25 am)

    James McQuaid,

    Sorry, can’t see it happening at that price. Electric cars in china are quite niche products. At that price, your market is serverely limited. Less than 0.01% of people in china can even consider such a priced car, and those that can would want something a bit more luxurious. The volt is a great compact, but it is still a compact.

    Infrustructure is impossibly laging in china. Its beyond laging, extremely few homes have a garage or means to charge the car if they happen to own one. In all my time in china, I have never visited someones home that had a garage or secure electrical point external to the home to do same.

    I am vey passionate about this car, but the price is far beyond the worth of the car in that market, and there is no infrustructure even at the home of purchases.

    My only fear is every market that my import volts will have this sort of price tag, enforcing the opinion that electric cars are not ready for mainstreem production; something I personally do not believe.


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    Eco_Turbo

     

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (7:45 am)

    Anybody recognize those crossover looking cars behind the Volts? (maybe CTS wagons) Looks like a great vehicle for Voltec drive if it isn’t there already.


  8. 8
    James

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (7:45 am)

    xiaowie1:
    James McQuaid,

    Sorry, can’t see it happening at that price. Electric cars in china are quite niche products. At that price, your market is serverely limited. Less than 0.01% of people in china can even consider such a priced car, and those that can would want something a bit more luxurious. The volt is a great compact, but it is still a compact.

    Infrustructure is impossibly laging in china. Its beyond laging, extremely few homes have a garage or means to charge the car if they happen to own one. In all my time in china, I have never visited someones home that had a garage or secure electrical point external to the home to do same.

    I am vey passionate about this car, but the price is far beyond the worth of the car in that market, and there is no infrustructure even at the home of purchases.

    My only fear is every market that my import volts will have this sort of price tag, enforcing the opinion that electric cars are not ready for mainstreem production; something I personally do not believe.

    If China’s population as of 2010 was 1,338,299,500… That would mean 0.01% would be 13,382,995 – right? So if 13 million “even consider” the Volt or a Buick derivitive, and maybe just a scant slice of those bought one – wouldn’t that make it an astounding success? What boggles about China is the sheer size of it’s population, and the incredible growth in personal income in such a short time. Add to this China’s plans to escalate EV usage and encourage hybrid and alt-fuel transportation due to it’s acknowledged dread of petroleum dependence…Mix in how fast change occurs in a government-run society like theirs – if the government mandates it, it happens – FAST! And I would have to disagree with you there.

    Today in China, it’s not just government officials that can afford luxury cars. Mercedes, BMW, Audi, Bentley and others are very active in forging new markets in China. Some ( Volvo ) are OWNED by Chinese firms. There is a vastly increasing upper class there, and infrastructure projects abound.

    Those other vehicles just off the boat alongside the 10 Volts are Cadillac SRX crossovers, and they are not cheap at Chinese prices either ( $60-65,000 U.S. dollars ). I venture to say each one is spoken for already, or soon will be. Cadillac sales in China topped 3,000 units for the first time in a single month, rising 64.1 percent on an annual basis to 3,008 units. Demand for the SRX, Cadillac’s best-selling model in China, jumped 155.2 percent to 2,261 units in November.

    When it comes to auto sales in all segments , including over $70,000 – China is the vast new frontier.

    RECHARGE! ,

    James


  9. 9
    kdawg

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (8:23 am)

    Don’t get too excited. China will take care of their own first.

    China limits foreign auto investment:
    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/cars/China+limits+foreign+auto+investment/5938742/story.html


  10. 10
    kdawg

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (8:35 am)

    Based on all the scooters in China, maybe the PUMA or the RAKe would do well.

    3.jpg

    opel-rake-2011-bild-1.jpg


  11. 11
    James

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (8:43 am)

    kdawg:
    Don’t get too excited.China will take care of their own first.

    China limits foreign auto investment:
    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/cars/China+limits+foreign+auto+investment/5938742/story.html

    I don’t read anything in that article that spells panic to any American, European or Asian automaker. It may be a bump in the road towards foreign autos being built in China for the short time being.

    China is learning many lessons. One is that consumers drive economies, not vice versa. In the ’70s and ’80s millions of auto buyers in North America turned away from the traditional domestic brands to imports because the quality of the product and compared value was not there. Today things have changed, domestics have caught up and in some cases ( Volt being #1 in my book ) have exceeded import brands’ offerings. In a more even playing field, apples-to-apples, American cars are becoming a popular option to the foreign models that have dominated segments in years, often decades past.

    Each Chinese’ earns his/her money by the sweat of their brow. No-one wants to spend their salary on an inferior product, and Chinese cars are just plain inferior to a fault. I would say Chinese cars are not even to the level S. Korean cars were in the eighties – which is to say, horrible. S. Korea has soared to new heights as of late, and it’s carmakers are nipping at the heels of Ford, and soon, GM. It will take China many years to catch up. In the meantime, if superior cars and trucks are available, the Chinese consumer will buy them. Just as in America, even if the price is a bit more – they will want them.

    In America – we sadly gave foreign automakers large tax incentives and sweetheart deals to build their factories in our heartland. We did it in exchange for some jobs and political clout for some dignitaries who need to get elected. Granted, it will be harder for American and other corporations to gain manufacturing footholds in China – perhaps giving away intellectual property. Will it be worth it? We shall see. The Chinese government will be tested as it’s people will demand reliable transportation from their Chinese dollar.

    RECHARGE! ,

    James


  12. 12
    Bonaire

     

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (9:04 am)

    Do Nissan Leafs, Fisker Karmas and whatever else EV can be imported to China also not qualify for the incentives?


  13. 13
    Mitch

     

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (9:09 am)

    James,

    .01% is about 150,000. your number is 1% (1,338299500 / 10,000 = 133,530.) still a large number…


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    Jan 4th, 2012 (9:27 am)

    Even without the Volt qualifying for the incentives there is a big push in China to move people to electrics. I wonder what residual benefits will come to the Volt from a general EV friendly environment (focused driver education, infrastructure, etc…)


  15. 15
    James

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (9:33 am)

    Mitch:
    James,

    .01% is about 150,000. your number is 1% (1,338299500 / 10,000 = 133,530.) still a large number…

    It was about 5:15am here on the Left Coast when I wrote that – but still, math is my weakest subject. Thanks for the correction! :)

    China is ripe for electrification, their gov’mt is very up front about their need and will to build an electric transportation infrastructure. China and Russia have never been good friends. China’s recent dealings with Russia to connect to their pipeline project channeling crude oil into their country doesn’t sit well with the People’s Republic. With such a quickly increasing demand for an obviously decreasing commodity – they are wise to make such proclamations. An EREV or PHEV platform vehicle only makes the most sense in a country with such long distances to travel. These are some of the reasons I offer the opinion that Volt and PHEVs will sell well there even if the price is a bit above the average paid for a compact car.

    The Escalades Cadillac has sold there are just as big of a pain to fill up at the pump as they are here.

    CHARGE! ,

    James


  16. 16
    kdawg

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (9:49 am)

    James: In the meantime, if superior cars and trucks are available, the Chinese consumer will buy them. Just as in America, even if the price is a bit more – they will want them.

    You need to define “a bit more”. The incentives in China are as much as $19,000 for Chinese brands vs. $0 for imports like the Volt.


  17. 17
    Frank

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (10:05 am)

    Ok, I’m sorry, but I need an explanation,

    $79,000 ???? Are you kidding me? 5:30 am or not can’t anybody see the problem here??? Is there suppose to be a free trade deal with the Chinese? Sounds like tariffs, don’t you think.

    I’m a Canadian, and when we signed a free trade deal with the US, all our products were scrutinizes and levied a level playing field. If you’re going to accept Chinese auto makers to come into the US and sell their EV crap at 19,000 bucks with incentives, you guys have lost it.

    Wake up, tell these thieves where they can go and impose the same kinds of regulations that you imposed on us Canadians. Don’t tell me you guys are scared of these pr…ks!!

    IMO


  18. 18
    Noel Park

     

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (11:39 am)

    Koz: Coda would be excluded.

    #1

    Amen! +1


  19. 19
    Noel Park

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (11:44 am)

    Frank: Don’t tell me you guys are scared of these pr…ks!!

    #17

    Kinda sounds that way, doesn’t it? +1


  20. 20
    MotoEco

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (11:48 am)

    Maybe GM should make the case that the Volt should be eligible for Chinese EV incentives due in-part to the amount of Chinese sourced parts the Volt carries (directly through GM and their parts suppliers.

    Imported components

    - Engine from Austria
    - Battery from Korea
    - Dashboard from Korea
    - Suspension component from Korea
    - Considerable amount of Chinese parts(Normal GM practice)

    US sourced component

    - Chassis and body panel
    - UAW Labor
    - Motor/Generator

    http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?2673-How-much-domestic-content-in-the-Volt

    Just sayin…….


  21. 21
    Tim Hart

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (11:51 am)

    To me its sad to see the Volt going into China. They are maybe a step above North Korea but they still kill children that the parents desperately want and their “one child policy” is already a major societal problem. Hard to get excited about Volts in China.


  22. 22
    kdawg

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (12:09 pm)

    MotoEco: Imported components
    - Engine from Austria
    - Battery from Korea

    I wont comment on the other parts, but the engine is made in Flint MI. The cells will soon be made in Holland MI. The battery pack is made in Brownstown MI. The Volt is a min of 40% US content, and that # may be before the Flint Engine plant came online.


  23. 23
    pjkPA

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (12:22 pm)

    Good article Jeff.

    We need to get the Trade issue on the table … it is the 1,000lb gorilla no media will talk about because they are all partly foreign owned.

    The Japanese Germans and Koreans do the same thing… they put huge tariffs on our products while coming the the big dumb USA and suck billions out our economy…. what do we do… we spend our taxpayer money to give them $7500 per electric car… we let them set up shop here and build plants that pay no US taxes….etc.. etc.


  24. 24
    Noel Park

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (12:38 pm)

    kdawg: I wont comment on the other parts, but the engine is made in Flint MI.The cells will soon be made in Holland MI.The battery pack is made in Brownstown MI.

    #22

    If the engine is being made in Flint now that’s good news. Mine (B1567) was made in Austria. And all or part of the “motor/generator” in mine was made in Japan. 40% US content in my admittedly early version.


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    Jan 4th, 2012 (12:39 pm)

    pjkPA: what do we do… we spend our taxpayer money to give them $7500 per electric car… we let them set up shop here and build plants that pay no US taxes….etc.. etc.

    #23

    Yeah, some kind of bizarre national death wish IMHO. +1


  26. 26
    MuddyRoverRob

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (2:17 pm)

    Let the reverse engineering commence…

    sigh.


  27. 27
    kdawg

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (2:34 pm)

    MuddyRoverRob: Let the reverse engineering commence…
    sigh.

    Five of the first sold in fall of 2010 were probably to Toyota/China/Ford/Nissan/Chrysler. They most likely have been probing at the Volt for over a year now.


  28. 28
    MuddyRoverRob

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (3:02 pm)

    kdawg,

    You are very likely right about that, the simple fact is that the Chinese have it down to a science they absolutely cannot be trusted.
    It frustrates me.


  29. 29
    Kent

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (3:31 pm)

    How long do you think it will take the Chinese to reverse-engineer the Volt?

    I’m a 48-year old American-born Chinese and have lived in the US all my life. Never even visited China. That being said, if our politicians don’t “grow a pair” any time soon, well, all I can say is that I’m glad I already speak Chinese.

    Love my Volt (#4386)!


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    jeffhre

     

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (4:55 pm)

    xiaowie1,

    There are over a billion people in China.


  31. 31
    jeffhre

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (4:58 pm)

    Tim Hart:
    To me its sad to see the Volt going into China. They are maybe a step above North Korea but they still kill children that the parents desperately want and their “one child policy” is already a major societal problem. Hard to get excited about Volts in China.

    I don’t think the solution to these problems will come in the form of China importing more petroleum.


  32. 32
    James

     

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (5:08 pm)

    kdawg: You need to define “a bit more”.The incentives in China are as much as $19,000 for Chinese brands vs. $0 for imports like the Volt.

    Have you ever used the term: “You couldn’t pay me to buy/drive that product ( insert adequate expletive here if you wish )” ? I have – many times. I think the same applies here. Back in the eighties and early nineties, you couldn’t pay me to buy or drive a GM, Ford or Chrysler product. I would read about the dismal education and attitude of the common Michigan auto worker – how they did the minimum possible, and lobbied for the maximum pay. When my WWII vet ( Pacific theater ) dad had the brand-new Honda Accord they’d just purchased parked in the garage next to his Mercedes, and he was shaking his head at the pure quality, panel gaps, fit and finish of the bargain Japanese machine – he said, “I seriously, as a man who’se been in the car industry for decades, can say this quality for this price is amazing!” Hearing this, and going into a Chevy dealership and having the seatback tilt mechanism freeze in the down position on the Camaro I sat inside in the showroom (!) had my resolve to buy foreign from then on out.

    I believe Chinese consumers won’t be sold out. Sure, the lower classes will have to bend to government pressure to buy Chinese – but the affluent, the business climbers will not.This is precisely the demographic that dovetails with a Volt purchase.

    RECHARGE! ,

    James


  33. 33
    James

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (5:25 pm)

    Kent:
    How long do you think it will take the Chinese to reverse-engineer the Volt?

    I’m a 48-year old American-born Chinese and have lived in the US all my life. Never even visited China.That being said, if our politicians don’t “grow a pair” any time soon, well, all I can say is that I’m glad I already speak Chinese.

    Love my Volt (#4386)!

    I’ll revert to my prior comments re: Hyundai and Kia in the 1980′s vs. today. No matter the will, the funding or the sheer manpower – the auto industry is still a tough nut to crack. Russia built spaceships, nuclear subs, lightning-fast fighter jets and transcontinental ballistic missiles yet to this day has not figured out how to build a decent car. There is no doubt China will make a run for a global slice of the auto industry and may very well succeed one day. That day is no time soon, however.

    As stated here on GM-Volt.com many times, building a viable car for the masses is not like building an iPhone or plasma TV.It’s heavy industry. The supply chain takes eons to develop. Reliable, capable team networks have to work together like a choreographed dance to insure a final product that can compete and work well enough in common folk’s hands to garner a following and return buyers. The first five-eight years of Hyundais and Kias shipped to America were the epitome of the term “POS”. Sure, today they seem to not only have gotten on top of manufacturing challenges, but nearly jumped ahead in some cases. Add to this the sheer expense of time and money for R&D. In the 1960s Japan’s middle name was “Xerox”. Every single thing that came out of the country for export was a copy of someone else’s handiwork. Still, it took over 15 years for them to start penetrating the U.S. auto market with any clout at all.

    RECHARGE! .

    James


  34. 34
    Tim Hart

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (5:44 pm)

    We received our Volt last Friday and the sticker indicated the engine and the drive unit are built in thr USA. Soon the batteries will be. How great is that!


  35. 35
    James

     

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (5:59 pm)

    Tim Hart:
    To me its sad to see the Volt going into China. They are maybe a step above North Korea but they still kill children that the parents desperately want and their “one child policy” is already a major societal problem. Hard to get excited about Volts in China.

    This is decidedly true, however their money still spends the same. In reverse, Communism rails against nearly everything America holds dear, yet they love to take our money – our money spends just fine over there. Every battle won, or U.S. product sold in China is a small victory in my eyes. Just like the internet opens eyes world over to open cracks into oppressed people’s homes and minds, so, I believe does free commerce. What but respect can an admirably engineered piece like Volt gather from the Chinese citizen’s minds?

    Rather than open new government agencies, as Obama did today, and spend more and more dollars to build a larger and larger government while borrowing more and more from China to support such nonsense – doesn’t it make sense to TAKE THEIR MONEY? It’s far too late for sanctions and moral high ground. That’s for Iran. We’ve been sucking after China for their credit for too long. We’re in deep. If we played the moral high ground game today – we would just batter our economy ’til near death. It’s time we at least take some salvos toward China by selling our goods and services. Sure we need to bring home domestic manufacturing. Sure we need to strive diligently to once again be able to promote human rights and individual civil liberty. We’ve just been selling out to the Chinese for too long for that to halt us from bringing our goods and expertise to their shores.

    In my mind the free market wins. It’s amazing how democratic free markets are, and we need to start somewhere. We need to move product, and what better place than to China?

    VOLT- IT’S MORE FREEDOM THAN ELECTRIC!

    James

    I will also say to those who view China as so superior that they’ll reverse engineer Volt in two years and kick our butts: Look at the Three Gorges Dam project in China. It has been deemed by some as a total failure, at the least it’s half as proficient as predicted. Websites and Chinese fanpages tout many superior stealth fighter planes and war machines that would “humble” the Americans, but as yet, nobody has seen anything to back up these claims – drawings and claims don’t go too far. Chinese scooters and motorbikes shipped to this country are cheap and flimsy. My dad once purchased a Chinese power generator that was claimed to be superior at one-third the cost – and it puffs and huffs like a Navajo smoke signal!

    Don’t get me wrong, China has a lot going for it, especially cheap manpower and a people used to doing what the master says. That said, there is great envy there of what we Americans can do. You have to believe that intrinsically, our free market systems of competition have just proven to be superior to their means of doing business.


  36. 36
    pat

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (6:04 pm)

    I think US should re-evalate its policies towards china. I wud suggest Coda should not be given any subsidy unless China gives it. China only understand tuff buisness policies …

    By the way the total Volt sales in Dec were higher than Nov … Go Volt.


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    Noel Park

     

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (6:50 pm)

    Kent: That being said, if our politicians don’t “grow a pair” any time soon, well, all I can say is that I’m glad I already speak Chinese.

    29

    No s__t! +1

    I don’t think it’s a coincidence that many of the top students in our elite local high school are now studying Mandarin.


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    Noel Park

     

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (6:53 pm)

    Tim Hart:
    We received our Volt last Friday and the sticker indicated the engine and the drive unit are built in thr USA. Soon the batteries will be. How great is that!

    #34

    That is great indeed! +1


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    Noel Park

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (6:54 pm)

    pat: I think US should re-evalate its policies towards china. I wud suggest Coda should not be given any subsidy unless China gives it. China only understand tuff buisness policies …

    #36

    Amen to that too. +1


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    Nelson

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (7:09 pm)

    Unlike most Americans the Chinese seem to understand the importance of weaning automotive transportation from fossil fuels. They realize they are largely dependent on foreign oil and are taking aggressive steps to resolve this dependency. I wouldn’t be surprised if the Chinese government restricted the sale of gas only cars in the near future.

    NPNS!
    Volt#671


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    GM Dealer's son

     

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (7:44 pm)

    Comment deleted – Note: No expletives allowed here.


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    kdawg

     

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (10:45 pm)

    James: Have you ever used the term: “You couldn’t pay me to buy/drive that product ( insert adequate expletive here if you wish )” ? I have – many times. I think the same applies here.

    I dunno. Give me $19,300 AND I get to skip the license plate lottery. If I lived in China, I’d probably by a Chinese BYD vs. waiting and trying to buy a regular ICE for the same price or a Volt for $19,300 more.


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    xiaowei1

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (10:59 pm)

    James,

    The volt will only be available in selected large cities – Beijing, shang hai, and tianjin to start. So, 30 million people is the start market, with only a small percent actually having the money to buy luxury items. 0.01% of the 30 million is the potential market size. Of those, who is going to pay 80k for the volt when you simple won’t be able to find a plug for it? How many people who did buy a volt in the US would have done so at twice the price? I’m waiting to get one and could afford it, but I would not pay this price. There are over 1 million millionars in the US, I don’t see 1 million orders for a volt which is half the price and can be recharged at home.

    I have lived in china long enough to really doubt its success there at this crazy price. I am sure the volt will do well in the US, but its a very different market.


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    xiaowei1

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    Jan 4th, 2012 (11:04 pm)

    yes but most earn a couple of dollars a day, and only a fraction live in Beijing, shanghai, or Tianjin. The market is much smaller than the collective suggested.
    jeffhre,


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    omnimoeish

     

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    Jan 8th, 2012 (1:46 am)

    MuddyRoverRob:
    Let the reverse engineering commence…

    sigh.

    Yep, we’re selling just enough at just the right price that only people with reverse engineering intentions will buy them.