Mar 14

Survey shows more education needed for EVs and hybrids to sell

 

While readers of this site and other alternative energy proponents are keenly aware of emerging transportation technology, a significant number of American car buyers remain uninformed about even the basics on how EVs and hybrids work.

These were the findings of a survey answered from Oct. 22-Nov 2, 2010 by 1,898 new car buyers and shoppers last fall, who if graded, would have scored from a C at best, to a low F.

Aside from what it might suggest about people who are not even close to being up to date in the most information-saturated society in history, their lack of understanding is being seen as a persistent barrier to sales, says Synovate, the firm that conducted the survey.

Ignorance is not bliss

Surprisingly, somewhat more was known about comparatively new Battery Electric Vehicles (BEV), than Plug-In Hybrids (PHEV), and Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV), even though hybrids such as the Toyota Prius have been around since 1997.

Near the same time Synovate quizzed grown-ups, Detroit-area students participated in a web-cast presentation on the electrification of automobiles featuring the Chevrolet Volt. Getting the older folks who drive and spend money to learn as eagerly is now being realized as a major hurdle to overcome. (Photo by Jeffrey Sauger for Chevrolet)

Want some examples?

About a third answered that BEVs produce tailpipe emissions.

Just over one half did not know it takes more than 15 minutes to recharge them.

Fully 85-percent confused all-electric BEVs with hybrids and Extended Range Electric Vehicles (EREV) like the Chevrolet Volt, and said BEVs are fueled by both gasoline and batteries.

Answering questions about hybrids, 77 percent said these cars are fueled by hydrogen, and 72 percent said they have zero tailpipe emissions.

(Wrong) answers prompt more questions

How it is that a third of this cross-sampling of Americans still think hybrids run solely on battery power 14 years since popular versions were first introduced, is open to anyone’s guess.

If it is true America is “addicted to oil,” as oil-industry affiliated former President Bush said, then one might surmise millions of alleged addicts still haven’t reached out that much for help.

Or, perhaps efforts to enlighten them by both Republicans and Democrats, the media, car companies, and other advocates have not been heard.

Survey results from 1,898 new car buyers. Extended Range Electric Vehicles (EREV) were not surveyed, but analysis can be applied to such examples as the Chevy Volt.

The closer one looks, the more its seems the “addiction” metaphor is extremely fitting.

The survey further indicates that many Americans are not well aware of alternatives to internal combustion engines (ICE) even though many millions of their tax dollars have gone toward grant programs and stimulus handouts used to fund them.

Is it apathy? Are people simply overwhelmed? Tuned out? Just too busy?

What ever the reasons, the survey reveals at least one major variable contributing to why top auto executives predict worldwide market share for EVs and hybrids will range from (only) 2-10 percent nine years from now.

For the foreseeable future, according to Stephen Popiel, senior vice president of Synovate, car dealers will have to spend time as the first to explain the working of EVs, plug-in hybrids, standard hybrids, and, one could deduce – EREVs like the Volt.

“We have to wonder if consumers will become disillusioned when they understand the actual requirements of electric vehicles, Popiel said, ”Will the person who goes to their Chevy dealer to buy a Volt, or their Nissan dealer to buy a Leaf, still buy the vehicle once they discover the need for plugs and 220 volt outlets? And, if they become discouraged with the electric option, will they stay and buy a different Chevy or Nissan vehicle? Or simply leave in confusion?”

Need for education

In case anyone is just getting caught up, the proposed “paradigm shift” for alternatively powered vehicles is not the name of a new type of transmission.

Seriously, Popiel said the evidence is clear that much more will be needed to teach consumers.

“The C and D grades consumers earned [when totaled] in our research simply aren’t good enough to support the profound societal shift the industry will need to deliver federally-mandated quotas,” Popiel said.

While asking whose job it is to get the message out, Popiel offered his view that it was in the interest of pioneering automakers, although work done to build consumer acceptance would later be capitalized upon by automakers that follow. It is also the job of the government leaders who are promoting alternative transportation solutions, he said.

“Clearly, there is a role for government to play, beyond just legislating quotas. There needs to be a significant consumer education process to explain why we must move from a petroleum-based powertrain to an electric based powertrain,” Popiel said, “The awareness campaign would have to address questions of environmental protection and national security, i.e. dependence on foreign oil leaves our society vulnerable to outside disruptions.”

Tipping point?

As many alternative energy advocates would be quick to agree, the reasons why everyone needs to know how EVs and hybrids – and other technologies – work are actually cross-cultural, and transcend political affiliation and individual sentiment.

No matter where you stand on topics like global warming, peak oil, the quality of the environment, national security, reducing America’s dependence on foreign oil, augmenting American industry, and more, EVs and hybrids potentially offer something for people of all ideological stripes.

This said, Americans have often been accused of being crisis managers.

Actually, with runaway national debt, a trade imbalance, and other economic issues, there is abundant evidence that as a nation, We The People are not even managing our crises very well.

So how will the industry sell more EVs and hybrids as one solution to some of the problems this country faces?

A typical response is the tipping point hinges around the vehicles’ price, the price of oil, and thus fuel.

While this assertion may contain some validity, let’s briefly think about its latter half.

What would happen if gasoline and diesel did go to $5 per gallon – and did not stop, rising toward $6 or more, approaching or even equaling what people already pay almost everywhere else in the developed world?

Would it mean automatic sales for EVs and hybrids? In the short term, it is likely. In the long run, do we really know?

Such talk gets bandied about by auto industry execs and pro-EV fans all the time.

Fact is, economic writers disagree on this hypothesis.

Similarly, philosophers also disagree on many subjects, but one statement widely held in one form or another is, “be careful what you wish for.”

If fuel costs do rise to new levels, what would happen to the cost of petroleum-based plastics in automobiles? How much more would it cost to supply parts for their manufacture, to run their assembly lines, and ship them?

For that matter, since petroleum is used pervasively, what would happen to the cost of computers, a loaf of bread, the cost to send kids to school, housing – the cost of everything?

How bad could a potential domino effect be to the entire economy if the price of oil escalated significantly, say to $120, $150, even $170 per barrel or more as some have already predicted it could?

Even if more Chevrolet Volts were produced, and demand increased, would the Volt and other cars still be able to sell for the prices they do, and would people have the money to pay for them?

This is the survey prospective new car buyers were asked to answer.

The consequences of runaway oil prices is something the mainstream media, as well as “underground” contrarian economic newsletters can speculate about, but fact is, until we go down that road, we do not really know.

And short of this, what would be more amenable than essentially hoping for another crisis – or at least more financial pain – for purported “addicts” to then be forced to manage?

Besides automakers lowering selling prices as soon as feasible, how about we all push even harder for next generation batteries with increased energy density and faster recharge times?

This is what they are already working on, we know, and for the sake of EVs and hybrids, there are many who say the technology can’t come soon enough.

At the same time building more recharging infrastructure and finding more effective ways to power the grid, are also seen as enlightened solutions rather than yet another crisis to fix by an already overburdened society.

So, coming back to the lead topic, it is at least clear that more people will need to wake up to the situation facing us.

Alternative transportation solutions are actually just pieces of a larger puzzle everyone stands to gain or lose by learning more about.

While EVs and hybrids haven’t sold a lot of the “car guys” or even most consumers yet, the need to solve the problems they are intended to is already there, and it is at least free to learn about them. If more people do, some may even find they could meet their needs now.

This is a complex topic. We know we’ve only scratched the surface.

Just offering some food for thought.

This entry was posted on Monday, March 14th, 2011 at 4:55 am and is filed under General. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

COMMENTS: 46


  1. 1
    nasaman

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (5:51 am)

    ATTN GM MARKETING: It is suggested you circulate an email to 1) all staff members and 2) all advertising agencies that are involved (or likely to become involved) in Chevrolet Volt advertising and marketing with a link to this extremely important topic: http://gm-volt.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-ajax-edit-comments/php/comment-editor.php?action=editcomment&p=7513&c=270538&_wpnonce=37feda28b6&height=445&width=560


  2. 2
    nasaman

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (6:03 am)

    CORRECTION: Replace the link above with the correct one following: http://gm-volt.com/2011/03/14/study-shows-more-education-needed-for-evs-and-hybrids-to-sell/#comment-270539

    PS: I’ve emailed the above link to Cristi Landy, a key senior manager on the Volt program at GM.


  3. 3
    Eco_Turbo

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (6:07 am)

    What buyers will understand is the gas gauge staying on full, most of the time, but still being able to go visit grandma when they want to. The push on the lower back when accelerating from a stop is why people will “need” to buy these cars, the rest of the benefits will come as pleasant surprises. JMHO


  4. 4
    Dan Petit

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (6:15 am)

    Maybe my experience teaching techs of all differing experience backgrounds can help.

    Technical education is a multilevel process.

    First, you must define the technical level of your potential audience.

    Second, you have to determine if each group is a near term, not so near term, or far term in regards to interest. (The very best shops say “Definitely” to technical training almost immediately BTW.) (There are also those whom are very hard working, honest, and professional, but whom have already given up in themselves, which is a disappointing thing to discover.)

    Third, you configure the facts at several levels of experience as entry points to trigger total involvement of the several types of audience.

    Fourth, you conform and converge the facts from the outer ranges of audience experience into the targeted set of conclusions. You know that you have accomplished this because there are conclusions advanced from the audience that are just one step ahead of your content, which means that your audience has acquired all the concepts they needed to have.

    In over 7 years of teaching complex content, 70 percent of the audience “get it” to the extent that they are very functional and sufficiently advanced to perform well.

    Of all participants, 60 percent are so completely on board with the curriculum, that they are able to be awarded a certificate of “high” or “highest” comprehension with my signature on it.

    I also require clear indications of dedication, honesty, and customer loyalty. When I see these traits all throughout the 7 hour to 22 hours of seminars, there is a gold foil seal with my company imprint holding three ribbons. They are red, white, and blue. Red is for dedication, white is for honesty, and blue is for customer loyalty.

    So, if you change your process to be dedicated to your ideals and values, profound things happen every day.


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    Jim I

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (7:41 am)

    People have had 100 years to get used to gasoline based transportation, so I am not really surprised that so few are up to speed with the specifics of BEV, EREV, PHEV, and Hybrid based vehicles.

    Ask some questions about how ICE engines work, or any other high technology product to the general public, and I think you will find an equal lack of knowledge. Most technology is far beyond the scope of the average person’s understanding. They don’t really care, as long as it will work for them…….

    NPNS

    Have Outlet – Ready For EREV In Ohio!!!!

    :-)


  6. 6
    Dan Petit

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (8:14 am)

    The more you know about your technology, the more you have control of it.
    This is especially true in autos, of course, since you also know what it needs, and what it does not need. As we all know, if you are unaware of what it needs, you can be sold anything under the sun and go broke PDQ.

    It’s the same genre’ with mostly everything else in America. We have been oversold the “plug ‘n play” to the extent that we as a nation, have become less technically competent to understand what we do not need.

    This is the reason for the red, white, and blue ribbons for the certificates I issue.

    We can’t afford to continue to go broke. Legislation can not substitute for the minimal level of technical awareness that could maintain our solvency. Cutting taxes, cutting budgets, cutting this, that, or anything else as the only mode for cutting deficits just won’t work anymore by themselves. The educational process has got to change everywhere. That starts with curricula everywhere. Legislators aren’t going to “get it” any time too soon. It’s up to us.


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    Shawn Marshall

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (8:40 am)

    More ‘education’ is needed to sell the government’s massive intrusion into health care.Not. What’s needed to sell BEVs is more range and less cost. It is all about the battery.

    GenI is a great treat for techies and/or eco-freaks but for the free market, not so much…

    Let’s look forward to GenII. instead of trying to push a rope.


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    mark

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (8:48 am)

    While I agree that the U.S. is addicted to oil in spite of government subsidies for alternatives, we should not neglect the subsidies that also already exist to support our oil addiction. Afterall we pay for wars to secure our oild supply with tax money, we neglect the cost impacts of oil imports on our countrys trade imballance and the impact of healthcare costs and environmental damage caused from the pollutants that are emitted from our oil use and road construction and maintenence is also paid for with tax money (not to mention the fact that oil companies are provided tax breaks). (I realize that electric cars also use electricity that is mostly made from coal which also emits pollutants and EVs also use our tax-subsidized roads, but I mention these subsidies because many alternatives to IC powered cars do not contibute equally, if at all, to these costs/problems.)

    My point is that we are addicted and our capitalistic democracy makes it very difficult to enforce changes that would be unpopular to our oil addicted population. We subsidize alternatives so they can compete with an even more subsidised petroleum option but we wont do what is really necessary to even the playing field.

    So why would the majoity of the US population care so much about the enormously subsidized IC engine?


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    CorvetteGuy

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (8:53 am)

    I was ‘banging my drum’ about the need for “EREV Educuation-Style” commercials until my arms fell off, and they didn’t listen.

    We did get a cute commercial telling a 120-v plug to “Breathe. Just Breathe. You can do this.” And that’s fine but it never explained “why”.

    I guess I could try again and see what happens…

    slogan32.jpg


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    kdawg

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (9:09 am)

    Unfortunately, most people have to learn the hard way.


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    Starcast

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (9:12 am)

    I think if you ask average Americans questions on anything they will not do much better then they did on this. In fact I bet they do worse on most things.

    Try asking what is the national debit? I bet less then 68% will get it right.


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    flmark

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (9:31 am)

    To tell the truth, I am surprised the survey results are as good as they are. The ignorance of the common man can never be underestimated. I love to watch jay leno’s jaywalking. Q: Who bombed us at pearl harbor? A: Hitler Q: What was Hitler’s first name? A: Timothy. Many people without life insurance wouldn’t know the difference between whole life and term life. Should we be surprised that many people without an electric vehicle wouldn’t know how it was powered?


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    Mar 14th, 2011 (9:43 am)

    Breaking news:

    Japanese automakers forced to suspend production in order to assess quake/tsunami damage:

    http://www.thedetroitbureau.com/2011/03/quake-tsunami-deal-blow-to-japanese-automakers/

    This includes Toyota (Prius) and Nissan (LEAF).


  14. 14
    Jackson

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (9:46 am)

    flmark:
    To tell the truth, I am surprised the survey results are as good as they are.The ignorance of the common man can never be underestimated. I love to watch jay leno’s jaywalking. Q: Who bombed us at pearl harbor? A: Hitler Q: What was Hitler’s first name? A: Timothy. Many people without life insurance wouldn’t know the difference between whole life and term life. Should we be surprised that many people without an electric vehicle wouldn’t know how it was powered?

    Q: Who is buried in Grant’s tomb?
    A: Uh … Elvis?

    The ignorance of the American people is nothing short of breathtaking. The sad part is that, in many cases, it is a deliberate affectation.


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    BLIND GUY

     

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (9:47 am)

    One way or another change happens. Education is always a +. IMO most Americans have become spoiled and resist change until it’s cheaper to do the right thing. OT I got to the party late yesterday.


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    Jackson

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (9:49 am)

    Of most people I have contact with, the majority do not know what the Volt is; of even the tech-savvy, many do not realize that it carries a generator (and think that 40 miles is all you get).

    Sheesh.


  17. 17
    Mark Z

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (9:55 am)

    Jay Leno makes a living from people not being able to answer simple questions. Yet Jeopardy does the same with difficult questions. It’s as Dan mentioned earlier, you have to know the audience.

    The audience that wants to learn about vehicles will visit a showroom, attend an Auto Show, read Car magazines or read the April edition of Consumer Reports.

    More drivers are lowering their windows while I am stopped at a traffic light to ask questions about the Volt. The price of fuel does make a difference in the drivers interest.

    Soon “Revenge of the Electric Car” will give the public another opportunity to learn about plug in vehicles.


  18. 18
    Jackson

     

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (10:02 am)

    BLIND GUY:
    One way or another change happens.Education is always a +.IMO most Americans have become spoiled and resist change until it’s cheaper to do the right thing.OT I got to the party late yesterday.

    So, BLIND GUY, is there a cellphone out there that blind people can use? (my question for you from yesterday)? I was glad to read your take on the automotive noise-for-the-blind in yesterday’s thread (#204).


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    Truman

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (10:03 am)

    Most Americans don’t understand how internal combustion engines work either, or transmissions, or even the windshield wipers.

    So what.

    They don’t buy new Hummers or Ford Excursions anymore because those models were killed off by rising fuel prices. As fuel prices keep rising, more and more models will be killed off. When BEV’s, HEV’s, and PHEV’s are a big fraction of the remaining viable vehicles, then they will be a big fraction of what Americans buy. Marketing, dealers, neighbors – when they are all telling Joe and Jane new-car buyer that these vehicles are what you need, that’s what Joe and Jane will buy. Only some types of vehicles will be affordable to operate, so that’s what people will be buying.

    Even if they still don’t understand how they work.
    $5/gallon gasoline – a better teacher than $10 billion in “education” attempts.

    It doesn’t matter what people “wish for” – Peak Oil is coming, and the unrest in the Middle East is just a preview of what happens to fuel prices when oil supplies can’t be relied upon.


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    stuart22

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (11:59 am)

    Why is this a surprise? Ask the same people what vehicles use a 4-stroke engine and its guaranteed a good portion won’t know the answer.

    The bottom line is that the average person considers their car as a tool – as long as it works well and doesn’t give them trouble, then they’re happy. The only thing that will wake these people up to cars like the Volt is when the price of gasoline exceeds their threshold of acceptability.


  21. 21
    BLIND GUY

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (11:59 am)

    OT #18 Jackson So, BLIND GUY, is there a cellphone out there that blind people can use? (my question for you from yesterday)? I was glad to read your take on the automotive noise-for-the-blind in yesterday’s thread (#204).

    I have a $50 Samsung “Haven” cell phone with voice out-put for all buttons/menus. The NFB and Ray Kurzweil teamed up to put GPS and a Optical Character Recognition scanner software that uses the cell phone camera to take pics of menus at restaurants or most other print and then reads that print to you. The built in GPS works similar to the GPS That I described yesterday. That particular phone with additional software I think is about $2600.. As long as devices have tactual buttons or voice recognition ability and voice output is very helpfull; blind people can usually learn how to use devices. Tactual “live” moving maps would not be practical for mobility purposes JMO; nothing beats hearing what and where objects are around you and hearing where they are going. Most people use their hearing to alert themselves of danger and get a sense of orientation. Some sighted people don’t notice the help of hearing until it is interrupted; like your ears clogged and throwing your balance off. Again; any added sound to quiet vehicles need not be any louder than the average ICE vehicle is now JMO.


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    Noel Park

     

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (12:21 pm)

    Jim I: People have had 100 years to get used to gasoline based transportation, so I am not really surprised that so few are up to speed with the specifics of BEV, EREV, PHEV, and Hybrid based vehicles.

    #5

    Completely agree. +1 But, when the next crisis hits, more of the unprepared will perish. GM is strategically doing the right thing for its long term survival IMHO.


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    Noel Park

     

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (12:23 pm)

    kdawg: Unfortunately, most people have to learn the hard way.

    #10

    True that. +1


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    Noel Park

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (12:34 pm)

    Mark Z: More drivers are lowering their windows while I am stopped at a traffic light to ask questions about the Volt.

    #17

    Me too. +1.

    A neighbor walked down the street yesterday, knew what the car is, and asked me questions for about 10 minutes. We may call ourselves “techies” (not me, LOL), “greenies”, or even “geeks”, but we are also the point of the spear of a revolution that has to happen. Word of mouth from us, and our simple act of putting the cars on the road for the public to see, is probably worth more that all of GM’s marketing efforts put together.

    I apologize if this sounds presumptuous, but we are performing an important service for our fellow citizens by putting our money where our mouths are and helping to lay the groundwork for viable alternatives to exist when the next crisis hits.

    All credit and “+1″ to each and every one of you.


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    Noel Park

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (12:35 pm)

    Truman: It doesn’t matter what people “wish for” – Peak Oil is coming, and the unrest in the Middle East is just a preview of what happens to fuel prices when oil supplies can’t be relied upon.

    #19

    Alas, too true. +1

    Se also #24


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    T 1

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (1:11 pm)

    CorvetteGuy: I was ‘banging my drum’ about the need for “EREV Educuation-Style” commercials until my arms fell off, and they didn’t listen.

    I remember, and still think you’re approach would be better. Since the ‘awareness & understanding’ issue is a very complicated one, I say KISS. Replace the current Volt ‘image’ ads w/ practical/explanatory/educational ones (remember Infiniti’s ‘Zen’ ads? A failure). Keep working hard to get the price down and make sure the quality is way, way up. Oh, and more balloons. I gotta have more balloons. lol


  27. 27
    statik

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (1:12 pm)

    Jackson: Breaking news:Japanese automakers forced to suspend production in order to assess quake/tsunami damage:http://www.thedetroitbureau.com/2011/03/quake-tsunami-deal-blow-to-japanese-automakers/This includes Toyota (Prius) and Nissan (LEAF).

    Oppama (where the LEAF is made) is back up operating tomorrow (which is Wednesday in Japan). Here is the quote from Nissan this morning: “•Nissan’s Oppama, Kyushu, Shatai and Yokohama plants will suspend operations until Wednesday, March 16.”

    Also of interest, now that there Japanese pre-orders are filled, Nissan got a boat in the water on the 10th containing 600 LEAFs for the US :
    “•A shipment of more than 600 Nissan LEAFs destined for the U.S. left port in Japan on March 10, just prior to the earthquake, and will arrive as scheduled. Future impact, if any, on Nissan LEAF supply continues to being assessed.”

    If you are keeping track of such things, Nissan lost close to 500 units of production for the LEAF (provided the plant is running 100% tomorrow)

    http://nissannews.com/newsrelease.do?&id=2319


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    omnimoeish

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (1:37 pm)

    My favorite quote seems fitting for today’s article. The only thing scarier than witnessing the intelligence of the average American is realizing that half the population is even dumber than that.


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    Mar 14th, 2011 (1:46 pm)

    omnimoeish: My favorite quote seems fitting for today’s article. The only thing scarier than witnessing the intelligence of the average American is realizing that half the population is even dumber than that.

    What happened to the other half of the earth in your avatar pic? lol


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    atljohnny

     

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (1:54 pm)

    Please let me get my Volt here in GA before everyone catches on.


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    Loboc

     

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (3:53 pm)

    Most people don’t know jack about cars. Even highly technical people that I know are clueless that you have to do things like get the brakes fixed every 50k miles or so.

    All they know is: gas goes in, the car goes. Some of them don’t even change the oil.

    I’m sure that most people in this survey are of a similar ilk. They need (or want) a car and they really don’t care if it runs on Mr. Fusion or rubber bands.

    This is why GM made the Volt ‘More car than electric’. We haven’t hit any yet, but, I’m sure that there are people out there that will never plug in their Volt. It’ll run just fine only using gas.


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    Steve

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (4:30 pm)

    I think this isn’t a problem unique to EV and hybrid car technology and is more indicative of education and knowledge in general.


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    Open-Mind

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (4:45 pm)

    Here’s something almost anyone can understand:

    40 miles in-town will cost you about $1.50 of electricity instead of $4 to $7 worth of gasoline.


  34. 34
    Dave K.

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (5:08 pm)

    Just keep cranking out the Volts. Although we are finding several false and biased press releases on the web. Word of mouth from real people is the key to getting Voltek technology out to the masses.
    I have had my Volt for 2 months now. Used 2.3 gallons of gasoline. I will be using a little more later this month as I have a few 80 mile trips planned. I’ll still be on the good side of 250MPG with Volt #555.
    Other cars boasting 45MPG (60MPG with feather foot hypermile) simply aren’t in the same league as the Volt. I have had trips of 20 miles where I rode the Volt fairly hard. Accelerating briskly onto the freeway and accelerating hard out of the corners on city streets. End result: Zero gasoline burned.

    No Plug, No Sale


  35. 35
    Jim I

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (6:53 pm)

    T 1: What happened to the other half of the earth in your avatar pic?lol

    ====================

    The stupid people forgot to turn on their lights when the picture was taken!!!!

    :-)


  36. 36
    WVhybrid

     

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (7:31 pm)

    T 1: What happened to the other half of the earth in your avatar pic?lol

    That photo may be from Apollo 8, circa Christmas 1968.


  37. 37
    kdawg

     

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (7:33 pm)

    Maybe those in the world that do not pay too much attention to technology, at least pay some attention to celebrities, and this will have some impact on Volt education.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8bC7OZZS-Q&feature=player_embedded


  38. 38
    Eco_Turbo

     

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (7:45 pm)

    kdawg: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8bC7OZZS-Q&feature=player_embedded

    OMG Please don’t give any attention to mybatcar.com


  39. 39
    Dave K.

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (7:55 pm)

    Volt #555 1972 miles on 2.3 gallons of gasoline.

    Volt55503-14-11.jpg?t=1300150404

    No Plug, No Sale


  40. 40
    kdawg

     

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (7:58 pm)

    Eco_Turbo,

    I wasn’t, but you did bring it up.


  41. 41
    kdawg

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (8:01 pm)

    Dave K.,

    You better plug it in. You only have 1 mile of AER left.


  42. 42
    LauraM

     

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (9:01 pm)

    Unfortunately, it seems like the situation in Japan is a lot worse than anyone thought. And there’s damage in areas previously thought unaffected. The state department just asked all Americans to cancel any nonessential travel to Japan.

    http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/pa/pa_5382.html


  43. 43
    greenWin

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (9:02 pm)

    What seems to be the most effective tool for education is to get these cars on the streets, in front of people who can see the benefit to driving EV modes. As the price of gasoline continues to rise, we will see a repeat of the recent gas crisis – a surge toward fuel efficient cars. Volt and Leaf are two of the best bets on the market. Education is required in many new technologies. When the first refrigerators came out people were wary of electric appliances – and the cost of electricity. The very earliest automobiles were a source of derision and complaints from people wary of mechanical transportation.

    The success in the USA of Prius, the precursor to PHEVs is the best education we have. If people want to know more about EVs they can go to the Chevy or Toyota dealer and LEARN. As for motivation – $5.00/gallon gasoline will get people educated right quick!


  44. 44
    Truman

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    Mar 14th, 2011 (10:32 pm)

    Shawn Marshall:
    What’s needed to sell BEVs is more range and less cost. It is all about the battery.
    GenI is a great treat for techies and/or eco-freaks but for the free market, not so much…
    Let’s look forward to GenII. instead of trying to push a rope.

    Some people realize that there won’t be a GenII unless enough GenI Volts are sold. I salute the early adopters, citizens who make big-purchase decisions based on more than just short-sighted Consumer Reports-type checklists, more than just some cost-benefit analysis suggested by a 22 year old magazine writer. Vote with your wallet, and push the world in the direction you’d like to see it go, with your wallet.

    That was a big factor in why I bought a Prius years ago, and why I will buy a Volt ASAP.


  45. 45
    flmark

     

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    Mar 15th, 2011 (12:33 am)

    OK Dave K, #39 I gave you +1, but…

    Quit taking pictures of your dashboard while going 73 MPH!!

    (or did a friend take it from the backseat while looking over your shoulder :) )


  46. 46
    Dan Petit

     

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    Mar 19th, 2011 (9:19 pm)

    Just a quick note to GM pros.

    I received a very thick envelope in the mail from research firm named maritz.

    I doubt that the request was from a GM subcontractor, as I have been posting my preferences here for years.

    It requested highly detailed information (including financial) regarding my potential automotive preferences, etc.
    They did not indicate if they were affiliated with GM.
    If GM would like research info, such a request would need to be from GM.

    So into the trash it went, because it looks like a new kind of scam.

    But, if it happens that GM would like me to participate in a survey, it has to be a direct US mail request on GM letterhead, and the information disclosed to be exclusively usable and restricted for internal GM purposes only.

    Otherwise, everyone, the scams are getting more sophisticated with very thick surveys.