Jan 10

Ford Announces Plugin Hybrid C-MAX Energi

 


[ad#post_ad]Ford is making good on its promise to offer a suite of electrified vehicle solutions.

Just last week they unveiled a 100-mile range pure EV Ford Focus Electric.

Now, at the Detroit Auto Show, the company has taken it one step further and has announced the planned production of a vehicle many among us have been wishing for a long time.

The C-MAX Energi is a small sleek minivan built on Ford’s global C-car platform. The upcoming gas-powered C-MAX is a bit longer and can seat 7 whereas the Energi can only seat five. Those issues aside, what is under the hood is pure magic.

The C-MAX Energi is a plug-in hybrid vehicle designed to front-load pure electric driving up to highway speeds. In this way it is like the Volt. In its first phase of driving operation it acts to deplete the battery. Different that the Volt, Ford engineers have decided to allow the gas engine to contribute minimally in this phase when “certain conditions are met.”

Once the battery has been depleted the engine will work in concert with the electric motors.

Ford will be implementing its upcoming third generation power split hybrid system in this vehicle. It uses an Atkinson cycle gas engine along with electric motors to achieve high fuel economy. Considering the size of this vehicle Ford claims through this system the C MAX Energi will delivers “better charge-sustaining fuel economy than Chevrolet Volt.”

Ford also claims the car will have a more than 500 mile driving range, once again besting the Volt.

Ford has not said how large the lithium-ion battery pack is or how long the charge-depleting range is. They did say the car could be fully recharged at 120-v “overnight” indicating the pack is likely close to the same 16 kwh the Volt has.

In addition to this vehicle, Ford will over a non plugin hybrid variant called the C-MAX Hybrid.

The C-MAX Hybrid will also utilize the third generation powersplit hybrid architecture allowing it to achieve more than 41 MPG, which is found in the current second generation hybrid Fusion. The electric motor will be abele to propel the car over 47 mph as well.

The C-MAX energy will provide drivers with a suite of on-board and off-board information to mange charging, and to monitor energy use and efficiency while driving. MyFord Moblie smartphone apps will also be provided.

These vehicles will begin production in 2012 at Ford’s Wayne Michigan Assembly plant, where the Ford Focus Electric will also be built starting at the end of this year.

“C-MAX Energi and C-MAX Hybrid will be perfect for families looking to maximize their hybrid car experience,” said Nancy Gioia, Ford director of Global Electrification. “Thanks to the versatile interior, these cars are going to appeal to environmentally conscious consumers who need room to grow.”

This car is similar in function to GM’s 2-mode plugin hybrid drivetrain, which the company is widely expected to announce production of at some point in the future.

Pricing of the C-MAX Energi has not been announced.

Source (Ford)



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This entry was posted on Monday, January 10th, 2011 at 7:21 am and is filed under General. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

COMMENTS: 36


  1. 1
    Mikeinatl

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (7:36 am)

    This could be more very good news once we fund out expected MPG and target price of the Energi!

    Cudos to Ford for their commitment to this new direction.

    Volt has thrown down the gauntlet and set a standard. Now the others are beginning to respond.

    This is what we have all been waiting for.

    Go Volt and Energi!


  2. 2
    Dave K.

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (7:38 am)

    Looks like manufactures are realizing the 2011 Car Of The Year is electric and will plug into a common 120V outlet. Good move by Ford. Ford stock may see a bump on this news.

    NPNS


  3. 3
    James

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (7:41 am)

    Oh the sweet smell of competition! Bring it on Ford – bring it on everyone. This is evidence that the Volt and it’s current publicity is having a significant effect on the auto world.

    Everyone gains from competition, and this little van surely will find a niche. Dual sliding doors a plus – especially for kids ( can anyone say plug in Mazda5? ). One interesting detail is that it appears smaller than Volt and still has seating for four with no middle seating area in the rear seat. What isn’t so obvous from these photos is if that rear cargo area flips up for seating.

    One other interesing point is that Ford’s statement: “better charge sustaining economy than the Chevy Volt” would indicate that they’re compensating for a significantly less AER capability.

    What do you all think?

    PUMP OUT THE VOLTS! ( in all 50 states ),

    James


  4. 4
    rick

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (7:53 am)

    It’s all good – Volt, Leaf, Focus. The more players, the better. Bring them all on and consumers will buy them. If we then start focusing on renewable energy resources to charge these cars, then we’ve reallyl got something going.


  5. 5
    Dave G

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (7:59 am)

    Right now the number of plug-in vehicles is so low that early adopters will applaud anything that comes out. But once plug-ins settle into the market, the difference between PHEVs and EREVs will be very clear, and the limitations of PHEVs will become obvious.

    If this vehicle offers the typical PHEV range of around 10 miles, then it will still run primarily on gasoline. In other words, plugging in just buys you a little better MPG. This means you still have to make frequent trips to the gas station as well as plug in every night.

    EREVs runs primarily on electricity. The gas engine is there when you need it, but there’s enough range that you usually don’t need it, which means trips to the gas station are rare.

    The PHEV is basically just an option on a regular (non-plug-in) hybrid. For the small amount of electric boost that most PHEVs offer, this option won’t be worth it for most people, especially if this is priced like the Prius PHEV.

    By contrast, the size and weight of an EREV battery requires major modifications to the chassis. In other words, EREVs are a whole new design, not an option on an existing design. So it’s more work for car makers to produce, but it’s a world of difference for the consumer.


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    ziv

     

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (8:11 am)

    It really comes down to the size of the battery. If it is more than 12 kWh, say a PHEV-25 miles AER, or a PHEV-30, this car will be great! If it is PHEV-14, it will still be a good car but the useable all electric mileage has to be more than 25 miles, I believe, to make it worthwhile. But the mpg numbers for the Energi running the ICE sound like they will be better than the Fusion Hybrids’ 41 mpg, so it is impressive no matter what. Pricing will be difficult. A 14 kWh battery doesn’t come cheap, but hopefully the Energi will be built EARLY in 2012, and will not drive the price too much over $37,000.
    The Volt and the Leaf have trumped the Prius in two completely different ways, and now the competition is moving to pass all 3. It is all good!


  7. 7
    Dave K.

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (8:13 am)

    Dave G: EREVs runs primarily on electricity. The gas engine is there when you need it, but there’s enough range that you usually don’t need it, which means trips to the gas station are rare.
    The PHEV is basically just an option on a regular (non-plug-in) hybrid. For the small amount of electric boost that most PHEVs offer, this option won’t be worth it for most people, especially if this is priced like the Prius PHEV.

    Understand your viewpoint. The reasons I like the Energi are a battery size similar to the Volt. And it’s the first EV I’ve seen that resembles a truck. I’m still calling Korea as the manufacture to deliver a wildly popular EV/EREV truck model. 2011 is going to a be a great year. The main reason I own a Volt (maybe this week?) is having electric drive all of the time. Many will play around with a mix of electric a slow speed then switching to gasoline. Or electric most of the time with hills and passing demands switching it over to gasoline part time.

    =D-Volt


  8. 8
    nasaman

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (8:19 am)

    I’m apparently a very ‘visual’ guy. Or maybe it’s just the ‘car guy’ priorities in me surfacing, but I always prefer to actually SEE the ‘big picture’ —what the designers, engineers & stylists have come with LOOKS LIKE before I dig into the engineering and other details.

    So here’s Ford’s latest ‘electrified vehicle’ offering…
    FordC-MAXEnergi_03_HR-e1294661758815.jpg

    And as a reference, here’s Ford’s Focus Electric they also just revealed…
    focuselectric79hr.jpg

    /Kudos Lyle for an inspired, very attractive ‘upgrade 4.0’ to GM-Volt.com! Amazing!


  9. 9
    Brian

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (8:21 am)

    You can write what you want BUT!!!!!! “the proof is in the pudding”. As we have seen with the Volt and the Leaf real world numbers didn’t quite come out as advertised. Version two batteries from LG and Argone Labs will change alot for the Volt. The tides of tecnology will swing back and forth as the industry changes and matures it will be fun to watch.


  10. 10
    john1701a

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (8:23 am)

    (click to show comment)


  11. 11
    john1701a

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (8:30 am)

    ziv: If it is PHEV-14, it will still be a good car but the useable all electric mileage has to be more than 25 miles, I believe, to make it worthwhile.

    BOOST the current MPG with a plug.

    The PHV model Prius pushes the 50 MPG average to around 75 MPG.

    What about that isn’t worthwhile?
    .


  12. 12
    Exp_EngTech

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (8:35 am)

    Very Important Seating Info…..

    “While this all sounds good, there’s an important distinction we must make. While all of the variants will share the C-Max name, there will be major differences between the conventional gas-powered C-Max and its hybrid and plug-in variants. The gas-powered C-Max will be a three-row, seven-seat mini-minivan with sliding rear doors based on the Grand C-Max concept. The Hybrid and Energi will be smaller cars based off of the C-Max concept and will only have two rows, five seats and conventional rear doors. Overall, the Hybrid and Energi will be five inches shorter both in length and wheelbase and 0.7 inches shorter in height. It will retain the same hatchback shape as the gas-powered C-Max.”

    From…..

    http://www.motortrend.com/roadtests/alternative/1101_2013_ford_c_max_hybrid_and_c_max_energi_plug_in_hybrid/interior.html


  13. 13
    nasaman

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (8:39 am)

    Now, with the photos of my post #8 ‘up on the screen’, side-by-side, here are some initial thoughts:

    The grills, alloy wheels and general body shapes of both are attractive & certainly establish a family resemblence; when I compare the two, I can imagine more easily that the new Van is actually larger than the Focus Electric sedan. Both are very eye-appealing designs! Both design’s larger grills have eliminated those two ugly vertical bars spaced at roughly 1/5th & 4/5th the grill’s width of some earlier renderings (good change!). Both place the ‘electric juice filler’ just ahead of the driver’s door as does the Volt (good decision!). Both are clean, good-looking, distinctive designs!


  14. 14
    Dave G

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (8:46 am)

    ziv: It really comes down to the size of the battery. If it is more than 12 kWh, say a PHEV-25 miles AER, or a PHEV-30, this car will be great! If it is PHEV-14, it will still be a good car but the usable all electric mileage has to be more than 25 miles, I believe, to make it worthwhile.

    Yes, exactly, +1.

    The problem is the size and weight of a battery that large tends the alter the design significantly. So far, PHEVs have been just an option on a regular hybrid design, so that really limits the battery size.


  15. 15
    James

     

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (8:47 am)

    BREAKING NEWS >>>>>>>

    June 10, 2011 – Chevy Volt ( finally! ) named “North American Car of the Year” at the Detroit Auto Show.

    http://www.engadget.com/2011/01/10/chevy-volt-named-north-american-car-of-the-year/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+engadget%2FOzKy+%28Engadget%29&utm_content=Google+Feedfetcher

    PUMP OUT THE 2011 NORTH AMERICAN CAR OF THE YEAR! ( in all 50 states ),
    James


  16. 16
    Eco_Turbo

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (8:51 am)

    A Prius is still a Prius, even if Ford builds it. Come on Ford. Show us something new. Match the Volt. 40 or 50 mpg just doesn’t cut it anymore.


  17. 17
    Dave G

     

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (9:12 am)

    john1701a: Aftermarket upgrades for Prius offer a capacity of +30 miles.

    The weight of the additional battery cells significantly affects the handling and crash safety of the vehicle. If this causes a fatality, who do you sue – Toyota or the aftermarket installer?

    This is the main reason most people don’t feel comfortable with major aftermarket solutions like this. Big companies have a lot more to lose, so they tend to be much more cautious with handling and safety issues.

    As I’ve said before, for a car that has 30+ miles of electric range/boost, designing that properly requires significant changes to the chassis and interior. It’s basically a whole new car.
    .


  18. 18
    Dave G

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (9:21 am)

    john1701a: The PHV model Prius pushes the 50 MPG average to around 75 MPG.

    As I’ve said before, miles per gallon is not a good yardstick for plugins. Gallons per year is more meaningful.

    For example, if one person gets 500 MPG and another gets 1000 MPG, that sounds like a huge difference, but it ends up being just 10 gallons per year.


  19. 19
    Dave G

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (9:26 am)

    Dave K.: The reasons I like the Energi are a battery size similar to the Volt.

    I’d be very surprised if the Energi has a battery size similar to the Volt.


  20. 20
    redeye

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (9:45 am)

    Looks good.
    I’d hope for someone to develop a full sized minivan large enough to carry a 4X8 sheet of plywood. In the next 3-5 years ? That pretty much eliminates the need for a pickup truck.


  21. 21
    Jason M. Hendler

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (10:14 am)

    Imitation is the highest form of flattery. All those automakers must submit to the awards and honors the Volt has received, as well as the high demand from consumers.

    With Ford’s entry, GM will be pushed to implement a better range extender – compound rotary engine, micro-turbine, HCCI, etc. Hopefully, GM will have this all worked out in time to compete.


  22. 22
    Dave K.

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (10:56 am)

  23. 23
    evnow

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (11:00 am)

    From what I’ve read Ford was rumored to be making a Plugin Escape with 30 miles of EV range. If that holds true, Energi this will be the plugin of choice for families. 5 seater compact crossover with good trunk space. It will have normal doors rather than sliding – something Lyle didn’t emphasize. The hybrid & plugin will be quite different from C-Max ICE.


  24. 24
    Herm

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (12:09 pm)

    Its not a minivan, its a people mover! (Ford seems to avoid that term) 🙂

    I like this, glad they dont use the sliding rear doors of the minivan.. heard some rumors the plug-in version uses a 12kwh pack, the hybrid just a regular small battery pack


  25. 25
    N Riley

     

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (12:14 pm)

    The more, the merrier. Welcome, Ford. Let the competition begin in earnest.


  26. 26
    Schmeltz

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (12:46 pm)

    I like the looks of both the Focus Electric and the C-Max Energi but was hoping for some efficiency data to chew on. Has anyone anywhere in the car media or otherwise made an estimate of their efficiencies yet?

    Side note: I was hoping Ford would make their next Escape a PHEV rather than a C-Max derivative. I’m a little disappointed at that. Perhaps the C-Max Energi will grow on me in time, but for right now, I need a little sulking time. There’s nothing wrong with the C-Max, I just prefer the mid-size SUV or Crossover better.


  27. 27
    Herm

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (2:13 pm)

    Jason M. Hendler: Imitation is the highest form of flattery.All those automakers must submit to the awards and honors the Volt has received, as well as the high demand from consumers.With Ford’s entry, GM will be pushed to implement a better range extender – compound rotary engine, micro-turbine, HCCI, etc.Hopefully, GM will have this all worked out in time to compete.    

    Ford is not imitating GM at all (in regards to the drivetrain).. if anything the Focus BEV imitates the LEAF and the Energi plug-in imitates the Prius plug-in.. but yes, GM will have to improve the CS mode mpg in this day&age of 40mpg+ conventional cars.. probably some weight savings with new batteries and an atkinson engine, perhaps the 1.8l used in the Cruze with new cams and compression ratio.

    Volt was the first one, following cars will be improved as is natural.


  28. 28
    evnow

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (3:24 pm)

    Dave G: I’d be very surprised if the Energi has a battery size similar to the Volt.  (Quote)  (Reply)

    Why ? 16 kwh gets you max tax credit.


  29. 29
    Nick D

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (4:17 pm)

    I like it, if its priced less than the Volt, GM may be losing a Sale in May 2013.

    I love the hatchback style, its a nice looking car.

    I still dont understand why GM did not use atkinson cycle in the volt – that would have certainly upped the MPG in CS mode.


  30. 30
    Loboc

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (4:31 pm)

    redeye: full sized minivan

    Lol. Is this similar to ‘Jumbo’ Shrimp?

    Take a look at the Ford electric van. It looks like it has plenty of room.


  31. 31
    shortale

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    Jan 10th, 2011 (10:02 pm)

    I agree that the claim about beating the Volt’s CS mode points to less AER.

    To me, the fundamental difference is the serial hybrid design versus what appears to be a battery boost to the HSD or Ford’s variant thereof. I’d liken it to the jets being introduced at the end of WWII. The P-51 thoroughly outclassed the P-59, the 1st American jet fighter, but the path forward was clear and it wasn’t propellers. There were even various jet/propeller hybrids, some of which continue today (propjets), but the jet clearly won out.

    The serial design offers an almost infinite flexibility as to genset choices and configuration of traction motors. It also lets you chuck out a whole pile of gears. Because the components (genset, battery, motor) are less tightly bound than in the parallel configuration, it should be simpler to take advantage of independent improvements in any one of the three without throwing the entire design out of balance. The independent components should also be simpler to configure in any number of shells.

    This presents a radical shift in the way car companies finance themselves. Capital expenditures like machinery and tooling should be less expensive but more frequent. Hopefully, the new GM management is up to it rather than looking to sell the plants to the floorboards so they can open up the next Ditech.com while whining about the bad old UAW.


  32. 32
    pjkPA

     

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    Jan 11th, 2011 (12:14 pm)

    Just a reminder…. 75% of drivers drive 40 miles or less per day.

    My daily driving is about 30 miles per day… all these solutions work for me!

    I really don’t care that much about the extended range…

    The Chevy Amp is my choice so far.


  33. 33
    jeffhre

     

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    Jan 11th, 2011 (12:49 pm)

    Even though my 5 Y.O. son still likes Jolt, Volts Transformer brother, if this vehicle pans out, it may be the one that’s just right for us.


  34. 34
    Dan Petit

     

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    Jan 11th, 2011 (1:08 pm)

    I’m really happy that FMC has announced a plug-in with extended range.
    I saw Mr. Mulally on TV on Sunday, and, he was really beaming and proud of
    Ford’s advancements. (I am too.) Great announcement Mr. Mulally! Congratulations!

    I would like the opportunity to test drive your new array of electrics someday.


  35. 35
    Sean

     

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    Jan 11th, 2011 (7:50 pm)

    Not a bad looking little car now if only we could have some interior photos of the car that would really be nice wouldn’t you have to agree with me? Plus my Mom and Dad may like to have a car like this in the future especially when you have 500 miles of range on gas but I also would like to know about how much electric range it will have and of course the price lets just hope it’s in the mid 20’s or low 30,000 range.
    But still I wouldn’t mind seeing future Plug-In Hybrids achieving 70 MPG or higher if ever agree?


  36. 36
    JP

     

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    Jan 25th, 2011 (3:52 pm)

    And the million dollar question is the MSRP? vs the Focus EV MSRP…