Jun 02

New 40 mpg Chevy Compact Car to Debut Next Year

 

Word is trickling out that GM will debut a new compact Chevy vehicle to be built on the Delta global compact car platform (same as the Volt) at an auto show later this year, and will begin production as early as next year.

The vehicle may appear alongside the Cobalt and go by a different name. The Cobalt will continue to be produced up to a 2010 model year and may then be discontinued.

The new car is reported to get 40 mpg and will use a direct-injection 1.4-liter, four-cylinder engine with twin turbochargers to do so, turning out up to 140 hp.

This may be the car we have previously seen a spy shot of (shown above).

This engine sounds similar to the configuration GM noted its upcoming lithium-ion BAS hybrid system might be ideally mated with.

As well the even smaller Beat could even make its way to the U.S.

All these reactions undoubtedly are in response to the huge consumer shift from trucks to cars due to high gas prices and the sluggish economy.

Source (AutoWeek)

This entry was posted on Monday, June 2nd, 2008 at 8:35 pm and is filed under General. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

COMMENTS: 92


  1. 1
    Vincent

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Vincent
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (8:44 pm)

    Good, They need it!


  2. 2
    Vincent

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Vincent
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (8:45 pm)

    Love the Twin Turbo part. Very cool!


  3. 3
    Brian M

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Brian M
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (8:53 pm)

    yeah this is great news. but the car in the photo looks too big to get 40mpg (maybe with a mild hybrid).

    could we be getting the Chevy Beat?


  4. 4
    Johnnie Paul

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Johnnie Paul
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (8:58 pm)

    #1

    We need it to…!

    Johnnie


  5. 5
    Vincent

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Vincent
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (9:04 pm)

    I think the new gen cars have the simple / clever mild Hybrid and direct injection.


  6. 6
    Dave B

    +1

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Dave B
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (9:07 pm)

    What’s so great about 40 MPG? My Passat TDI (which is an ’05) gets that… If this were a BEV that could go 80 mph for 100 miles, I’d get very excited. But the Beat? Boring.


  7. 7
    Grizzly

    +1

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Grizzly
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (9:07 pm)

    That 40 mpg is obviously highway. Why has it taken so long to get back to this? I remember the announcement in the late 70′s that the un-aerodynamic, carburated Chevy Chevette got 40 mpg highway besting all the imports.

    With all the advancements in technology why aren’t we far beyond this by now?


  8. 8
    BillR

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    BillR
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (9:15 pm)

    If we take one cylinder off this engine, we have a 1.05 liter 3-cylinder turbocharged engine.

    Could this be the ICE for the Volt?


  9. 9
    Vincent

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Vincent
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (9:19 pm)

    http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/bymodel/1985_Chevrolet_Chevette.shtml
    No, it didn’t. And those are the “old” non attainable EPA estimates.


  10. 10
    Brian M

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Brian M
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (9:19 pm)

    Grizzly, three reasons:

    1. Gas got cheap until recently, so most Americans didn’t want to buy a “penalty box” that got 40 mpg but had no get-up-and-go.

    2. Safety laws have added a great deal of weight to all cars.

    3. Small cars are not as profitable for automakers.


  11. 11
    Jes

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Jes
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (9:24 pm)

    Is this the MIT project finally hitting the market?

    I remember In Jan or Feb 2006 reading an article of MIT researchers making a petrol engine that when accelerating, uses ethanol to supress spontaneous combustion allowing 30% better fuel economy. It required a gas tank and a smaller ethanol tank.

    Here is a similar link.
    http://news.cnet.com/MIT-engine-boosts-mileage-by-30-percent/2100-11389_3-6129501.html

    If people continue to buy gasoline cars, I guess this would be a cheaper alternative, but I still want to see electric.


  12. 12
    mMatt

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    mMatt
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (9:27 pm)

    Hi,
    the photo above is showing the new Opel “Insignia” based on GM`s Epsilon platform!


  13. 13
    bruce g

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    bruce g
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (9:28 pm)

    Those Delta II production lines are going to be very busy.
    Could I say that GM’s redevelopment of the Delta paltform, started 2005 from memory, was very timely indeed.
    A Delta ll pickup soon perhaps?
    A Delta ll minivan?


  14. 14
    Speedy

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Speedy
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (9:31 pm)

    1.4 liter ecotec Four cylinder engine Turbocharger system, DI, HCCI, Full VVT, New Six Speed Auto, BAS Plus Mild Hybrid System with litium ion battery. That’s what it’s going to be.


  15. 15
    George

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    George
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (9:34 pm)

    #9, Vincent,

    Read your own page.

    1. At the top it says they are revised to meet the new estimates.

    2. Four from the bottom, says that the diesel 1.8L did get 41 mpg highway.

    So, under the old standard, they all probably did, under the new standard at least one of them did. Grizzly still has a legitimate question.

    Brian M, I don’t believe that the car has to be a “penalty box” to get good gas mileage. Because gas was cheap, there was no pressure to generated to create alternatives. Global Warming is only the rallying cry in this switch over, the real reason is 4$ at the pump and an unstable energy supply. We need to get off the oil so that when hyper inflation hits, we aren’t reliant on another country to bring us fuel.


  16. 16
    Vincent

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Vincent
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (9:41 pm)

    Yeah I see the diesel…we were talking gas. I missed the revised, sorry.
    Watching Barrett Jackson at the same time and some really nice cars were on.


  17. 17
    Vincent

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Vincent
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (9:43 pm)

    I was going to add in all the extra weight for air bags and such too.
    When Gas get 40MPG Diesel isn’t so attractive right now.


  18. 18
    Jason M. Hendler

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Jason M. Hendler
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (10:01 pm)

    Thank God GM has the new union contracts, so that they can produce these vehicles profitably. Moreover, thank God that the new CAFE standards and high gas prices push consumers to buy these vehicles in high quantities.


  19. 19
    Speedy

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Speedy
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (10:29 pm)

    mMatt, Your right and the Opel Sedan will show case HCCI and so will other Delta 2 and ESP 2 chassis cars.


  20. 20
    nasaman

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    nasaman
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (10:49 pm)

    11 mMatt, 18 Speedy….
    IF the photo at the top is the Opel Insignia as you say, and I’m not so sure it is, here it is “naked…..

    http://www.autoblog.com/2008/04/17/officially-official-opel-insignia-revealed/


  21. 21
    jbfalaska

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    jbfalaska
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (10:53 pm)

    You’re right about that – $14 per hour to build cars. By American standards, those are equivalent to peso priced Mexican wages.
    I should hope they’ll at least build them here after cutting those boys and girls wages.

    My hope as a retired US Air Force veteran, thankful to our countrymen for the support through many a tough year – Chevy Volt: American-made, and American-Fueled.


  22. 22
    Arch

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Arch
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (10:54 pm)

    I do not understand what this has to do with the Volt. There have been other cars with this kind of mileage. There has even been cars with better mileage. What does this have to do with the Volt?

    Take Care
    Arch


  23. 23
    Jeff J

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Jeff J
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (11:05 pm)

    Grizzly , golf clap!!! a ipod has more computing power then the apollo moonshot capsule . Back in 78 opec oil embargo we as a nation didn’t have the 1 one 100th technology that we have today . I like the statement that the commander of the Jap fleet said after his great attack on Pearl Harbor I quote ” I fear we have only awoken a sleeping giant.”
    17 # I just hope your family doesn’t suffer do to the high price of gas. I know mine is !!!!!!!GOD BLESS YOU you heartless ###


  24. 24
    Jason M. Hendler

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Jason M. Hendler
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (11:14 pm)

    Grizz and Jeff,

    Technology wasn’t the issue, it was pure economics and politics. GM could never afford to make a small, cheap, fuel efficient car with the pending benefits liability crisis. Fortunately, the UAW and big automakers solved that issue, then Congress worked with the big 3 and UAW to increase mileage standards in a way that was achieveable.

    Once those things were resolved, various technologies were implemented for market selection – ethanol, plug-in hybrids, fuel cells, etc.


  25. 25
    Jake

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Jake
     Says

     

    Jun 2nd, 2008 (11:35 pm)

    I will be surprised (but pleasantly so) if this car actually achieves 40 mpg in any conditions besides highway driving with a tailwind. It’s easy for people to say “well my XYZ gets 43 mpg,” but actually achieving 40 mpg overall is quite a feat in my opinion. It depends very much on the particular driving conditions.

    I happen to be a big fan of Consumer Reports, and I respect their auto reviews very much. Their data is not the be-all and end-all, but I think it’s significant that the ONLY car they have EVER measured to get 40 mpg or more overall is the Toyota Prius. It comes in at 44 mpg overall. Next down the line is the Honda Civic hybrid at 37 mpg. The Honda Fit and Toyota Yaris (manual transmissions) are next at 34 mpg each.

    So, congratulations if your car XYZ gets 40 mpg, but for an automaker to claim 40 mpg is different than actually achieving it on a regular basis. I wish Chevy the best of luck and applaud their efforts, but I fear this car will not really be any more efficient than the current crop of small cars. 30+ mpg overall would be nice, though.


  26. 26
    Speedy

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Speedy
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (12:40 am)

    It will have HCCI=15%, Full VVT=10%, Turbochager System=8%, DI=6%, BAS Plus System=15%, Six Speed Trans=7%. Gm’s New Ecotec engines can, and will go over 40 MPG, and further Say 50+ MPG.


  27. 27
    Jim I

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Jim I
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (12:50 am)

    Doesn’t anyone else find it interesting that GM can design, test, and produce a new ICE based model by next year, but the Volt with all of the round the clock engineering and testing will still not be on the market until late 2010…..


  28. 28
    Jim I

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Jim I
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (12:54 am)

    I am a programmer, so I do understand about all the software work to do, but another two years worth? And as far as we have heard, the major hardware and design work is, or should be, about done.

    So how does GM get all the required government testing and set up an assembly plant so fast for this new car??


  29. 29
    Brian M

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Brian M
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (12:57 am)

    Speedy and Jim I:

    How do you know they haven’t been working on it for a couple years already? They don’t go through full public disclosure for every car like they have with the Volt.


  30. 30
    Brian M

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Brian M
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (12:58 am)

    oops, sorry Speedy I guess it was just Jim I that I was responding to. I call that a “close to bedtime” mistake.


  31. 31
    bruce g

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    bruce g
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (3:50 am)

    Jim I,
    I think it is a supermarket trolley full of existing bits, a demonstration of the effectiveness of the Delta II concept.
    I assume the asssembly line is the third shift planned for Lordstown,
    Lets hope for GM’s sake they can repeat this timeline with other vehicles.
    Like an e-malibu for example.


  32. 32
    Jim I

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Jim I
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (6:52 am)

    Brian M: “How do you know they haven’t been working on it for a couple years already? They don’t go through full public disclosure for every car like they have with the Volt.”

    What US manufacturers were not still in “Hummer” mode three years ago????? Gas prices were at $1.75 in Jan, 2005. And if the car is just being shown for the first time at an auto show this year, and will be in production next year, it is just hard to believe that no one has heard anything about this model before this point…..

    bruce g: ” I assume the asssembly line is the third shift planned for Lordstown.”

    I live in Youngstown, and the Lordstown plant is a big deal here. The UAW is voting today on their new contract. The talk of a third shift and a new high mileage car is all just talk at this point. But I hope you are right!!


  33. 33
    Joe

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Joe
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (6:58 am)

    A high mileage small car? This is what I’ve been for a long long time. GM’s perception would be in a much better shape today if they had. All I hear and read about is GM’s fuel hungry vehicles. Hardly anybody will acknowledge that GM has the best gas mileage on at many many other vehicles. Glad to see this is changing. Keep up the good work GM and let it continue. If you do, I can see you going back to your old glory days. I know when it comes to innovations, when you want to, nobody can beat you.


  34. 34
    BillR

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    BillR
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (7:33 am)

    Perhaps this car is modeled after the Saab 9-X which was unveiled at the Geneva Auto Show. This car has a 1.4 L turbocharged engine, BAS+, and is based on the Delta II platform (same as Volt).

    http://www.autoblog.com/2008/03/03/geneva-08-previe-saab-9-x-biohybrid-concept/

    For the European driving cycle, it achieved 4.9 L per 100 km (48 mpg). This global car might well be far along in its development, so it wouldn’t be unrealistic to see it by the end of next year.


  35. 35
    Statik

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Statik
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (7:35 am)

    Time for a new topic:

    Press release rolling out now:

    “We intend to show a production version of the Chevy Volt publicly in the very near future, and we remain focused on our target of getting the Volt into Chevrolet showrooms by the end of 2010,” Wagoner said”

    Just before they mention shutting down FOUR truck plants. Janesville was a easy call. Moraine, Ohio, Toluca, Mexico and the beast of GM, Oshawa….not so much. That is at minimum 9,000-11,000 more jobs.

    Numbers still to come, and the ‘review’ of Hummer.


  36. 36
    Statik

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Statik
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (7:36 am)

    The market loves the axe…so I expect a GM bump on this ‘good news’…but might be tempered with fiscal results/foreshadowing later.


  37. 37
    Statik

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Statik
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (7:38 am)

    Still breaking:

    Hummer may be ‘discontinued’ or sold.


  38. 38
    Statik

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Statik
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (7:39 am)

    Moraine Plant shutdown stats:

    2,400 employed directly. The plant also supports 100 suppliers


  39. 39
    Statik

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Statik
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (7:43 am)

    Oshawa truck plant:

    Over 3,000…about 1,000 already in process of severence from 3rd shift cut a couple months ago.


  40. 40
    TOM M

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    TOM M
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (7:45 am)

    Nasaman:

    I found an interesting conversion for my new 08 Ford Escape. This is now available for the 4 banger @ $1000. There is a propane conversion kit and it will run on gas or propane. If it runs out of propane before you fill the tank it automatically switches over to gas.
    The tank is a donut that fits where the spare tire goes. When we used propane on the ranch tractors and trucks the engines were extremely free of carbon build up and were very clean when we tore them down. Right now I can buy propane for $2.50 a gallon.
    I’m seriously considering this conversion. Still have over two years before the VOLT and I am not buying another auto till then.

    Have a good day,
    Tom


  41. 41
    Statik

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Statik
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (7:46 am)

    “The Janesville factory employs 2,246 hourly workers and 193 salaried workers”


  42. 42
    Bruce Ross

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Bruce Ross
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (7:46 am)

    I am curious if the technology used in the Volt is planned to be used in a smaller vehicle that could potentially get 60 to 70 MPG? This type of car would sell on its fuel technology alone. 40 mpg isn’t bad though…. but I personally believe the car should be built around the concept of mpg…. and then everything else.

    Bruce
    Technology Professional


  43. 43
    Statik

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Statik
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (7:50 am)

    Hard to find numbers on Toluca…they had around 2900 about 10 years ago…I’d assume they probably come in around 2K as well.


  44. 44
    Statik

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Statik
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (7:52 am)

    If you want to watch the meeting live. It streams from here in about 8 mins…9:00AM

    http://gmlive.feedroom.com/?skin=liveoneclip&fr_story=4dec664e7ea04504b638cbfc82245a757081205a


  45. 45
    Statik

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Statik
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (7:55 am)

    Residential Capital LLC, the mortgage lending unit of GMAC LLC, said Tuesday it needs more than three times more cash to stay in business than it estimated just weeks ago.

    ResCap estimates it now needs about $2 billion in cash by the end of June to meet liquidity demands, according to a regulatory filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. It previously estimated it needed just $600 million by the end of the month

    In its effort to raise the necessary capital, ResCap on Tuesday will draw $450 million from an expanded credit facility with its parent, according to the regulatory filing. The expanded facility allows ResCap to borrow up to $1.2 billion from GMAC


  46. 46
    RB

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    RB
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (8:10 am)

    The several new GM small cars, all designed for the same or similarly sized platforms and similar high-mileage goals, are going to make it difficult for the average person to recognize what is different about the Volt, unless it has distinctive styling. As the Volt likely will be the most expensive of the lot, it is going to need that extra visual stimulus and reward. Mr Bonniface, your corporation and your public really need you now — please do your very best.


  47. 47
    banjoez

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    banjoez
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (8:16 am)

    From Fortune Magazine…..

    “But you can expect GM to thump its chest a bit over the plug-in Chevy Volt that it plans to get to the market by end of 2010. The Volt can run about 40 miles on a charge of electricity, and several hundred miles beyond that when its auxiliary gasoline engine kicks in. But at a rumored price of as high as $40,000, the Volt will be good for bragging rights, and not much more.”

    That $40k price is a BIG problem, that is why GM is coming out with high mpg ICE alternatives.


  48. 48
    Tim

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Tim
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (8:35 am)

    It seems like the primary focus is still on performance with the secondary focus on flex fuels leaving economy for 3rd. place.

    These priorities still seem backward to me. GM could do better.


  49. 49
    Van

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Van
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (8:38 am)

    Naseman #20, just throw a Chevy grille on it, shove a Volt drive under it, and show it to us on July 4. The only possible problem is the rear head room might be cramped.


  50. 50
    Tim

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Tim
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (8:47 am)

    Banjoz (#47)

    The $40K price is their COST to build the car. It has NOTHING to do with what they are willing to sell it for. They branded it a CHEVY because that is their mainstream product line.

    I believe that GM is willing to eat $10K (or more) per Volt for the first couple of hundred thousand Volts to get this technology into mainstream volume pricing. Both Sr. GM officers have gone on record saying as much. Don’t worry, GM is NOT going to let Toyota get the “technology leap” on them again. CHILL & WAIT. Time will tell.


  51. 51
    Joe Sixpack

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Joe Sixpack
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (8:54 am)

    I love the plug-in hybrid concept. It’s about damn time! OK. Here’s what I want: A two-seater that goes 60 miles on a charge, but gets 50mpg+ if having to run on gasoline. The driver’s seat can recline all the way so I can actually sleep for hours at a rest stop.

    The vehicle should be fairly fast (0-40mph) and have a bit of flair lookswise. Top speed of 90mph would be good enough. If you can get the price under $20K, you will sell a ton of them.


  52. 52
    Joe Sixpack

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Joe Sixpack
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (9:02 am)

    Flex-fuel mandate is another example of Congress being retarded and reactionary. You want to do something useful Congress? Provide bigger tax credits for solar and wind. Bio-fuels are another consumable resource. There’s plenty of wind and sun.


  53. 53
    Jim in PA

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Jim in PA
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (9:08 am)

    Another drawback is that ethanol has a lower energy density than gasoline, and small fuel tanks (Chevy Volt) will get less travel distance when using ethanol. How about the gov’t redirecting funding to portable fuel cell research? Fuel cells are more fuel efficient than ICE’s. Imagine the breakthrough if we had a cost-effective fuel cell that could run on gasoline. We wouldn’t have to worry about the distribution system like with a hydrogen system, since gas stations are everywhere. Is this a perfect long term solution? No, but it would be a good stepping stone to getting people used to fuel cells, and would reduce pollution in the interim.


  54. 54
    Joshua Bretz

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Joshua Bretz
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (9:15 am)

  55. 55
    Serpent2

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Serpent2
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (9:22 am)

    Li batteries are going to be the new gravy now that all the big trucks and suvs are going away


  56. 56
    Murray

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Murray
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (9:28 am)

    Love it…CNN’s main story, at this time, is about how GM is closing down the Trucks and SUV plants!

    Good news indeed. More focus on the Volt!

    Oh yeah, and I vote they drop the Hummer brand….do it!


  57. 57
    Theoldguy

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Theoldguy
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (9:47 am)

    My 07 MAXX is “rated” at 39 MPG highway and 29 MPG city…
    I just wish all governments everywhere would demand the the milage ratings would be “REAL WORLD TESTING”. I have modified my MAXX to acheive higher milage and still cannot get 39 mpg on the highway… I drove the car for 10 K Kms to break it in. Overall average consumption (city/hwy)
    9.8 L Per 100 KMs (28.1 MPG Canadian Gallon or 24.0 MPG US gallon)
    I then changed the air intake to a K & N system, removed the entire exhaust (except the cats….warranty issue) and installed a magnaflo system..
    Current (combined city/highway) milages are approximately 8.9 L per 100 KMS (31.7 MPG Canadian gallon or 26.2 MPG US Gallon.

    I will recover my costs very quickly due to the higher gas prices so it is worth it.

    If I “free wheel” as much as I can…(tried it over 2 tanks of gas) I can get 8.7 L per 100 KMS or about another 1 MPG (Canadian). bringing the total average MPG to 32.8 MPG Canadian.

    And this is still better that a lot of the new cars of similar size out there which are averaging 10 + L per 100 KMS.

    I would like to see real world milage (combined city/highway) to be at least 40 MPG (US Gallons) and then you would have some effiecient vehicles.


  58. 58
    Adam Galas

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Adam Galas
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (9:54 am)

    1.4 liter engine? About damned time we got a small, efficient engine!

    Since the Fit’s 1.5 liter engine gets 35 mpg, I can easily see a 1.4 liter, direct injection engine with twin turbos getting 40 mpg, combined real world mileage.

    Better than a civic hybird, almost as good as a prius.

    A great call by GM


  59. 59
    N Riley

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    N Riley
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (9:55 am)

    GM with a car that can get 40 mpg is good news for GM. They need this and others that can do even better to help get them into the new market for more efficient fueled vehicles. We really need the Volt in the show rooms by the end of 2009 at the latest. (The consumer needs them now.) But, good news, GM. We know you can do it and even make more improvements on mpg.


  60. 60
    blackseabrew

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    blackseabrew
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (10:43 am)

    Twin turbos!! Finally someone takes a small engine and pushes the air into. I’ve been asking for this for years. I hope the aftermarket folks will focus on the fuel-economy aspects and take it to the next level. But face it. A carbeurated 1985 Honda CRX 1.5 liter got 48 mpg(mine got 52 mpg on a hot day).

    If it’s got a decent overall design, I’ll buy this one. Please make a 2-seater/hatchback version.


  61. 61
    Serpent2

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Serpent2
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (11:05 am)

    watching the cnn stuff right now


  62. 62
    wwskinn3

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    wwskinn3
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (11:20 am)

    I still say with solor panels build into the roof it could recharge – at least partially while traveling to work and while sitting in the hot sun all day. Has anyone heard GM mention this as a possibility?


  63. 63
    N Riley

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    N Riley
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (11:33 am)

    wwskinn3

    One thing the solar panels could do is keep your car cooler and warmer when parked our in the parking lot. You could push a button to start the process. I am not talking about 68 degrees in summer/winter. Just keep it more bearable when entering the car.


  64. 64
    Joe Sixpack

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Joe Sixpack
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (11:34 am)

    Fuel cells are a waste of time. You still need to generate hyrogen. That will come from fossil fuels. However, solar panels can use electrolysis to seperate water into H and O2. The problem is how to capture and store the hydrogen?

    The easiest solution is to use a small plug-in hybrid that charges overnight and goes 60 miles before the gasoline engine kicks in. This way, you might fill up with ten gallons once a month. So even with $10 gas, the weekly budget is only $25 for gas.

    No need to change any station infrastructure. The only problem is GMs price point. At $30K, it will sell moderately but will compete with the Prius. If they can get it to $20K, they will sell huge volume.

    There is no plug-in hybrid on the market. And the market has been screaming for it for 5 years. I wonder what the fat cats at GM were thinking that they waited this long to see reality?


  65. 65
    Jake

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Jake
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (11:43 am)

    A quick correction on my part. Consumer Reports measured 51 mpg overall for the Honda Insight, but of course this car is no longer made. The Prius is currently the most fuel efficient car they test, at 44 mpg.

    I agree with Theoldguy that 40 mpg overall (real-world mpg) would be a very efficient car.


  66. 66
    jScott1

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    jScott1
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (11:47 am)

    40 mpg is significant. First of all it’s not diesel…have you priced diesel lately? I don’t think you want to be burning diesel in north America.

    Second, I don’t think you can compare a 70s econobox to the the technology of today’s cars. The airbags, ABS, computers controlled engines, etc of today’s cars add weight, and to achive 40 mpg on a modern car is a completely different thing.

    Now after a decade of $4+ gas we may see a push for 50 mpg and eventually 60 mpg. If people demand it, then GM will build it. Notice the Hummers are going away? 10 years ago people demanded the Hummers. No longer…


  67. 67
    noel park

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    noel park
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (11:54 am)

    What does 40 mpg mean? Is that the famous “highway”, which means next to nothing, IMHO? What is the city and what is the combined? If it is 40 combined, then we are getting somewhere.

    #35-39, 41, 43-45 Statik:

    Will the last one to leave please turn out the lights?

    #26 Speedy:

    Sorry for the ignorant question, but what’s WT?


  68. 68
    RB

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    RB
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (12:44 pm)

    #50 Tim said “The $40K price is their COST to build the car. It has NOTHING to do with what they are willing to sell it for. They branded it a CHEVY because that is their mainstream product line.”

    I agree that the price and the cost are two different animals. As to costs, though, my guess is $14K for the car, plus $9K for the batter, giving $23K total. The car is simply a Cobalt-size with no extraordinary materials. The battery is whatever it is. I realize that it would be great for GM to have a good markup for legacy costs, for the bottom line, and for the dealers, and there should be room for that.


  69. 69
    Chris

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Chris
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (12:46 pm)

    How much and only 40mpg ??? At the rate gas is climbing


  70. 70
    Paul-R

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Paul-R
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (12:55 pm)

    Thanks Jashua (#54) for the NY Times article link. That article stated “better mileage is a problem for Detroit automakers because they offer fewer such models than Asian carmakers like Toyota.” I don’t believe it’s only a Detroit issue … that seems like a perception because reporters (like this one) keep repeating it and because Toyota has the Prius. I’m sure Toyota is shifting their manufacturing focus in a similar way, because my local Toyota dealership has about 30 Tundras (13M MPG city) on their lot. More Tundras than any other model, plus many other gas guzzlers too.


  71. 71
    Paul-R

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Paul-R
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (1:00 pm)

    I think it’s a sure-thing that GM is going to ditch the Hummer brand. At this point it’s nothing but a liability … described by Mr Lutz as the perceived “anti-Christ of vehicles”. Plus it would be a very symbolic gesture that would help get the anti-Detroit media off their backs.


  72. 72
    Paul-R

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Paul-R
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (1:03 pm)

    Now that it’s becoming apparent that the US is preparing to “get off oil”, I wonder if OPEC will lower their prices (as they did in the 70′s) to “keep the junkies hooked up.”

    At this point, $3/gallon gas would seem cheap, and OPEC would still be making tons of money.


  73. 73
    Jeff M

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Jeff M
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (3:31 pm)

    I’m surprised no one has mentioned the Geo Metro! Let’s bring it back! See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geo_Metro

    I remember one of my college class mates bought one when she gradulated. It sat 4 or 5, and with a 3 cyclinder 1.0L engine mated to a manual trasmission got 50 miles per gallon…. and this was over 20 years ago!

    Even my 1987 Nissan Sentra that had a 4 cyclinder 1.6L engine mated to a 5 speed manual reliablely got 35mpg highway, and I had a carb version, and being a male in my 20′s I didn’t drive for fuel efficiency (yes, I sped a lot, fast starts and breaking, etc).

    Imagine with 20 years of engine development (turbo chargers like in this concept mentioned, variable valve timing, etc) simliar small (but not tiny like the Fortwo or mini-cooper) 5 seaters could be designed that gets 60mpg with an ICE at a low price. And with even just parallel hybrid technology could get 80mpg!

    Of course part of the problem is weight differences from 20 years ago… and I’m not talking about vehicle weight… America’s obesity epidemic adds lots of weight to a car (someone computed once somewhere how many more barrels of oil a day we consume due to loss of MPG due to all that extra weight and it’s a lot!). High gas prices is not only helping curb oil consumption, but hopefully making America healthier by encouraging folks to walk and bike more to get places.


  74. 74
    Jeff M

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Jeff M
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (3:42 pm)

    Re: Paul-R and Opec…

    It doesn’t matter if America reduces consumption… it’s worldwide demand you have to look at. Oil should be looked at the same way the refined gasoline is delivered in the USA… the pipelines are actually shared… producers pump into one end… at the other end(s) gasoline is taken out and put into big delivery trucks… the gas taken out one end likely was refined by one or more different companies. The real difference between the brands are the additives added afterward.

    It’s also supply and demand … even if the growth in demand slows… if supply slows even more then prices will stay up. World markets set prices, not OPEC. OPEC only controls how much member countries are allowed to pump. However more and more believe OPEC is already producing at the max… I think the real reason when Bush went to the Saudi’s and asked for them to increase production, he was told no. It’s called peak oil. There’s still lots of oil to be had… but the “easy” oil is running out. As prices go up it makes it econmically feasable to go after the harder to get oil, such as from mature fields, or deeper wells… but because it’s harder to get it also keeps prices up. There’s still plenty of oil to be had for 100 years if folks are willing to pay for it, and you don’t care about release all that carbon back into the air that it took millions of years for those ancient plants to capture and store.


  75. 75
    wwskinn3

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    wwskinn3
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (4:18 pm)

    Some of you engineers out there tell me – could thin solor panels on the roof generate enough electricity to be worth the effort if the car sat in the sun all day? Enough for even partial charge?


  76. 76
    Paul-R

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Paul-R
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (4:48 pm)

    Jeff M (#74), I agree that one needs to look at global demand, however the USA (as we are often reminded) is a very big chunk of that demand. Also, the electrification of transportation will be a global change, not just a USA change.

    Crude prices have doubled recently, and I’m not convinced it’s because we are running out of “easy oil”. I think it’s because OPEC is marking up their product by 1000% (or whatever) instead of 500%, and they use the commodity markets to justify that markup.

    And it’s not simply supply/demand that determines the price. Addiction (literally and figuratively) is also a factor. For example, as a drug addict I might pay $1000 (I’m guessing) for a bag of heroine. However, since I’m not an addict I wouldn’t pay a dime for it, because to me it’s just useless powder. Drug dealers are smart enough not raise the price so high as to break the addictions, or they will put themselves out of business. I think the same is true of oil. Right now, I MUST use gasoline to get to work … I’m addicted. The Volt could break that addiction for me.

    OPEC should realize that once we have a choice in transportation fuels (electricity vs gasoline), then we are no longer addicted to their oil. Right now, I will buy their gasoline whether it’s $4 or $40, because I must drive to work. Once I can commute to work using electricity, then I’m not going to buy their gasoline any more, whether it’s $4 or $2 or $1. I think that could become the case for millions of people on a global scale.

    I’m probably belaboring the whole “addiction” topic, but I just want it to be clear exactly what I mean.


  77. 77
    Jim I

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Jim I
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (4:57 pm)

    I am not an electrical engineer, but this has been discussed many times before.

    To recharge the batteries in the Volt will take 8KW to get the pack to 80%, assuming the batteries are at the 30% SOC.

    The area the size of the roof of the car, would not provide enough power to recharge much of the battery pack at all. It would be able to run some fans to keep the car cooler, but not much else.

    And the cost involved does not really make it a good investment.

    If you want to do solar, consider a rooftop system at your home. That will provide some real benefits.


  78. 78
    Tagamet

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Tagamet
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (5:52 pm)

    I only scanned the posts because as soon as I saw this thread I had to wonder if this couldn’t actually BE the volt shell. I know that that’s a pretty left-handed idea, but it’ll be released before the volt, would test the waters about the shell and there’s no reason the EREV system couldn’t “fit” (at least from that angle). I know. It’s unlikely, but it’d fit “very soon”
    T


  79. 79
    noel park

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    noel park
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (5:55 pm)

    #26 Speedy:

    Variable Valve Timing? The W threw me.

    #73 Jeff M:

    Amen. And thanks for mentioning Variable Valve Timing. It made the penny drop. VV is the same as W, or at least close enough to baffle the likes of me!


  80. 80
    JN2

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    JN2
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (6:39 pm)

    # 67 Noel:
    V-V-T = Variable Valve Timing


  81. 81
    Morgan

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Morgan
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (7:00 pm)

    #75

    depends on a lot.

    1) Size of panel
    2) output of panel
    3) sunlight levels
    4) efficiency of charger
    5) type of battery (lithium ion batteries are much more efficient in charging than NiMH or Gel Lead Acid)

    The E-Car industries measures their batteries in WH (watt hours)while most batteries are rated in AH (amp hours) and energy output in solar cells is measured in amps with the max output voltage on a solar panel generally being 24 if connected in series but the voltage reduces your charge time.

    If you know the ampere and voltage output of your solar cell pack (amperes and voltage) you can determine how many watts you are putting in the battery. Just move this formula around until it suits what you want to do

    Amps = Watts/Volts in this case the watts being put into a battery from a solar cell would be: A*V=W


  82. 82
    Speedy

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Speedy
     Says

     

    Jun 3rd, 2008 (10:39 pm)

    I’m sorry about the picture of above, it is these 2010 Chevrolet Cobalt as a 2009 model year.


  83. 83
    noel park

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    noel park
     Says

     

    Jun 4th, 2008 (12:28 pm)

    i have said about 100 times, both here and on the Fastlane blog, that if GM built a car like this I would buy one, if only to bridge over to the Volt.

    The sooner the better. Time’s a wastin’!


  84. 84
    Ken Grubb

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Ken Grubb
     Says

     

    Jun 4th, 2008 (1:23 pm)

    All hybrid fleet for 2009, even if it’s BAS.

    Put 2 stage hybrid in the Aveo and Cobalt, rather than just higher end vehicles.

    Deliver the Volt.

    Continue moving the entire fleet, year after year, away from gas and towards batteries.


  85. 85
    noel park

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    noel park
     Says

     

    Jun 4th, 2008 (6:10 pm)

    #84 Ken Grubb:

    Amen.


  86. 86
    Dave

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Dave
     Says

     

    Jun 6th, 2008 (3:39 am)

    An American car company actually building what the public wants…I never thought I would see that day. I may actually have a reason to seriously look at GM cars when I and my wife are ready to trade in our Camry and Corolla…..its about time!


  87. 87
    Richard

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Richard
     Says

     

    Jun 6th, 2008 (11:20 am)

    Most people here blame the high price of fuel strictly on the greed of the oil companies. The rapid rise of gas in the last year is probably more on free interprise (meaning commodity market) than oil company greed. People have found a way to get a cut of the fuel that you and I pump and that is with commodity investing. The recent craze in commodity investing is partly due to the emergence of commodity index funds, which act like mutual funds except they hold futures contracts rather than stocks. Such funds have made commodity purchases far easier for a wide range of investors, including hedge funds, investment banks, pension funds and university endowments.

    Over the past five years, investors have become such a force on commodity markets that their appetite for oil contracts has been equal to China’s increase in demand over the same period, said Michael Masters, a hedge fund manager who testified before Congress on the subject last month. The commodity markets, he added, were never intended for such large financial players.

    Commodities have become especially enticing to investors as the credit crisis has roiled other investment opportunities such as stocks, real estate, and debt-related securities. George Soros, one of the nation’s leading investors, testified in a Senate hearing this week that index funds were contributing to the rapid rise in commodity prices and were possibly creating a bubble. If it were to burst, sending prices tumbling, the fallout could wreak havoc on banks, retiree funds and colleges across the nation.

    This has been extremely profitable but at everyones expense at the pump. Write your congress person to have this changed to put some reasonable limits to this and this will reduce what we pay at the pump.

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/24996843/ (eye opening article)


  88. 88
    Rick

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Rick
     Says

     

    Jun 8th, 2008 (11:40 am)

    I actually saw the car on the I-17 freeway in AZ, this week. It was travelling with a Saturn Vue, Pontiac Soltice, a Saturn SUV, and a Chevy Malibu. They all had Michigan plates. It has a lighting bolt emblem in the center of the grill. I was assuming that it is related to the Volt project. I hear there are plans to introduce electric over gas hybrids in all of those models. I was in a PowerStroke deisel so I obviously didn’t hear any engine noise from any of the GM cars.


  89. 89
    jwcrim

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    jwcrim
     Says

     

    Jun 30th, 2008 (9:31 pm)

    “Right now I can buy propane for $2.50 a gallon.”

    That’s still pretty good these days. Given the lower energy/gal of propane that’s equivalent to paying $3.41/gal for gasoline.


  90. 90
    c.m.

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    c.m.
     Says

     

    Jul 20th, 2008 (3:30 pm)

    This sucks.
    The 1995 Geo Metro used to get 50mpg. I know, we had one.
    This is not some great leap forward but GM being dragged into the future by the market. If you really want to see new check out the VW Polo Blue and pray it comes to the US in 2010.


  91. 91
    Bob

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Bob
     Says

     

    Oct 30th, 2008 (11:54 am)

    the car makers can make 40 mpg+ cars BUT,,
    cost to much to make or sell (no $$ for them)
    the goverment don’t want this.

    toyota yaris 49MPG


  92. 92
    Jim

     

    Vote -1 Vote +1

    Jim
     Says

     

    Nov 1st, 2008 (7:53 pm)

    Volt. They keep talking about it, but it’s just a gas car that uses the first 40 miles on an electric. A :LOT of hype, it will not go over well. By the time this American made can FINALLy hits the showroom, it will be yesterday’s technology.

    Another American failure coming soon from Chevy.