Jun 21

GM-Volt EXCLUSIVE: Interview and Podcast with A123 co-founder, CTO, and VP of R&D Bart Riley on Building the Volt’s Battery Pack

 

Today I had the opportunity to interview Dr. Bart Riley, co-founder, VP of R&D and CTO of A123 Systems. We discussed A123′s battery system and how they are going about making the Volt’s battery pack system.

This interview is important in that is reveals the first details available about A123′s plans since the June 5th announcement by GM that battery contracts had been awarded

He indicated that A123 has over the past five years developed a battery system that has “unprecedented safety, power, and life.”

Specifically, they developed a nanophosphate cathode that differs from the cobalt-based system currently used widely in laptop and cell phone batteries. Those lithium cobalt dioxide cathode batteries can become unstable when charged or overcharged or abused and are subject to explosion. A123′s new safer cathode material nanophosphate, uses no cobalt, is not an oxide, and thus has no stability or safety issues. The cells can heat because they are high-power but cannot explode. Indeed the cells are already on the market in power tools.

A123 is collaborating with Continental AG to make the battery pack system which will meet GM’s requirements. Continental will put a large number of A123′s cells into a plastic case designed to handle the “abuse of the vehicular environment” and develop computerized cooling and battery management electronics that will examine each cell insuring that it does not come out of its ideal cycle of operation. There will clearly be a give and take between the two companies.

An important fact, Dr. Riley also noted that cooling the cells is important not for safety reasons, but because it is a “life issue” as he calls it. GM wants the batteries to last for at least 15 years of use and temperature variability can reduce battery life and must be avoided.

He states that the battery science is already complete and can meet the goals of the project, but minor tweaks of cell design may still have to take place for them to interact properly with the pack. Also packs must be able to be assembled on a mass-production scale. Unfortunately, as of this moment in time, he noted that a prototype pack does not yet exist.

Comparing this project to the Hymotion Prius extender pack which uses A123 batteries, Dr. Riley states that the Volt is a whole new platform as opposed to simply extending the battery life as Hymotion drop-in supplement does. That system though, can extend Prius driving range to 20-40 miles electric

Compared to Altair Nano’s system, he states that A123′s has higher energy density. Altair Nano uses a different anode, and winds up with 1/2 voltage and twice the weight per cell.

He stated that A123/Continental has no direct knowledge of the CPI/LG activity and are essentially operating in the dark from one another.

The goal of one year to functioning battery pack is approximate. He indicates GM is setting out a very aggressive time-line, but initial unit delivery for prototype vehicles could come out even in 6 months since A123′s focus is on “making things happen”.

Overall I got the impression that Dr. Riley was highly confident of his batteries scientific merit, safety, power, and durability characteristics. He seemed to indicate creating the pack was more of a second act; just a simple engineering process, and should be pretty straightforward.

I am certainly more confident that the unknown wild-card of the battery pack when it comes to the Volt’s production, is showing up as an ace!

Headquartered in Massachusetts, A123 has 350 employees there, in Michigan and in Asia.

Soon we will be hearing from the CPI team, so stay tuned!

Podcast Below:

This entry was posted on Thursday, June 21st, 2007 at 8:01 pm and is filed under Battery, Latest News, Original GM-Volt Interviews. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

COMMENTS: 50


  1. 1
    Brian

     

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    Jun 21st, 2007 (8:13 pm)

    Great news. I’m confident in A123.

    Will the battery pack be air-cooled or liquid-cooled?


  2. 2
    Dean Anderson

     

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    Jun 21st, 2007 (9:07 pm)

    I like the 15 year target life, after that the cost of replacement should be less than the beta model.


  3. 3
    MM

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    Jun 21st, 2007 (10:31 pm)

    15 year target life isn’t an intelligent goal especially since battery technology will be evolving extremely fast thus cars will continually be upgrading their power source every year or two.

    Forget about making them last 15 years, better make them safe and get 400 miles out of them with a life span of 100000 miles or 5 years. And better come up with a good marketing plan to sell short term upgrade options for batteries (GM should be paying me for these ideas!).

    By the way there is a good chance that EEstors new super capacitor will replace current battery tech, keep an eye out for them soon to be used in zenn’s low speed EVs 2007-2008:

    http://www.zenncars.com/home/EEStor%20equity%20investment%20April%2030%202007%20FINAL%202.pdf

    Keep up the good work GM, I’m glad you’re motivated to make EVs but you better learn to adapt and be flexible because the EV market is very different then the gas car market so your usual strategies don’t always apply.


  4. 4
    Tim

     

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    Jun 22nd, 2007 (7:00 am)

    Great information! Thanks for the audio. The speed of the R&D is impressive and encouraging as is the fact that the players are willing to be so open with the information. I think they know how many lives and money is riding on this.


  5. 5
    Steve F

     

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    Jun 22nd, 2007 (9:15 am)

    I agree with making the batteries last 15 years. The reasoning is the following. The batteries will continue to improve each year. But expect most customers after 5 years or so, sell their vehicle and purchase a new vehicle with newer battery technology and other newer components. Then sell their original vehicle to someone that cannot afford a new car. This is the current marketing trend and expect it to not totally change with EV type vehicles. For those customers with older EV type vehicle that want a battery upgrade, it could be supported by separate after market type providers. GM should focus each year in providing an improved new cars.


  6. 6
    Joe Malovich

     

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    Jun 22nd, 2007 (9:42 am)

    Shooting for a 15 year battery life-span is a good approach. Then when the battery is gone the car is at or near the end of its lifespan.

    A 20 year life-span would make the car more desirable, affordable, and increase resale.


  7. 7
    Chris

     

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    Jun 22nd, 2007 (10:56 am)

    Wow, 15 years! Awesome. One of the down sides to current hybrid cars is that by the time they hit the used market, you know you are buying old batteries that you will probably have to replace. When those batteries can cost more than the car itself, that is a no sell.

    Some of us don’t buy new, only used, and hearing that the Volt will actually come with “usable battery life” even when it is on the used lot after five years is wonderful!

    It means more of us will be driving electric cars, instead of poluting with our very old cars because they are a better financial investment than the new cars. I could buy a whole lot of gas, even at $5 per gallon before I saved money trading in my 1990 Miata for a 2007 Prius. :(

    Maybe, with usable battery life in used electric cars, it will actually start to make monetary and not just environmental sense to go electric. THEN things will REALLY start to take off.


  8. 8
    Bill Wallace

     

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    Jun 22nd, 2007 (11:54 am)

    What if an ultracapacitor were thrown into this PHEV/BREM equation? Certainly costs would be higher. I’m talking supplement/augment, not “instead of”. Any thoughts? Bill Wallace


  9. 9
    pedmac

     

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    Jun 22nd, 2007 (2:47 pm)

    i see he talks about partner continental ag
    , but i thought they where also partnered with Cobasys ? wat are they doing on that collaboration?


  10. 10
    Mark

     

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    Jun 22nd, 2007 (3:01 pm)

    15 years is the right answer – the batteries need to last the life of the car to make it in the market place. I worry when ever someone says something is a “simple engineering” problem. Getting from science project to mass produced product is far from easy. I’m rooting for GM on this one – I want my Volt!


  11. 11
    kent beuchert

     

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    Jun 22nd, 2007 (6:21 pm)

    The original lifespan quoted was 10 years , not 15, and there was even an admission by a GM team member that if this was the only shortcoming in a battery, less than 10 years would be acceptable. My guess is that GM wants 15, will settle for less. Cars generally aren’t on the road for 15 years, and they sure as hell still wouldn’t be under warranty.
    It’s also difficult to predict whether a battery will last that long, mostly because of the wear on connections and wires, which
    can be difficlut to estimate.


  12. 12
    Jack the R

     

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    Jun 22nd, 2007 (6:50 pm)

    No one says the original battery has to stay in the car for 15 years. Utilities are looking into buying used hybrid/EV packs to help them with load leveling. As new battery tech becomes available the old packs can be replaced and resold to utilities.


  13. 13
    Matt986

     

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    Jun 22nd, 2007 (8:44 pm)

    Well, one of the most common comments I hear from naysayers on other forums, is that they don’t want to have to replace expensive batteries after just a couple years, so the prospect of getting 10+ years out of the pack will be a very good selling point.


  14. 14
    MM

     

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    Jun 25th, 2007 (12:07 am)

    What I think most people are over looking is the mileage and performance you get out of the battery will sell the car, if you only get 100 miles on one charge your car won’t sell that great, even if the life of the battery is 15 or even 50 years. People would rather have a car that goes 500 miles on one charge and last 5 years then have a battery that last 15 years and goes 100 miles. Especially since people will be saving a lot on maintenance buy buying an electric car versus gas or hybrid that they won’t mind paying for the battery upgrade.

    For example, if you come out with a battery in 2010 that gives the volt 200 miles per charge and then in 2015 the batteries can get 700 miles with better performances, are safer and cost less, why would you want the batteries to last 15 years when inside of 5 to 10 years the batteries technology will be 10 times better and cost a lot less, who will want an old car that will probably cost just as much if not more then the newer versions?

    Remember folks that this is just the beginning and with all the competition in development, things will change very fast, the market will be more similar to computers then cars. Inside of 15 years cars will be going thousands of miles on one charge and inside of 25 years you won’t need to charge anymore. But I might be a little too optimistic, after all the big businesses will try to find a way to limit the batteries so they can make money making less efficient batteries… Only time will tell.


  15. 15
    Bud

     

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    Jun 27th, 2007 (1:05 am)

    So if the batteries did last 15 yrs has anyone thought about how the motor itself would last with heavy usage Would it last as long as the batteries and what would cost of replacement be ?


  16. 16
    Ziv

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    Jun 27th, 2007 (8:23 am)

    MM, I think you are missing the entire point of the Volt. We want to be able to plug our car in at night so that 95% of the time we won’t ever have to use the gas engine because we drive less than 40 miles a day. 100 mile capacity means nothing. 30 or 40 is more than sufficient! Electricity’s energy equivalent to a gallon of gas costs about 60 cents! I don’t drive 500 miles a week, why would I pay to have something that is so unimportant as 500 mile range? Like most people, I drive about 1000 to 1250 miles a month, or about 30 miles a day with 1 or 2 days of 60 to 70 miles. I would use my gas engine 2, maybe 3 days a month. Even if the Cobasys or 123 comes out with a better battery in 2015, why would I want to replace a battery that works well enough to do everything I ask of it?
    Bud, motors tend to last a lot longer than engines. I haven’t heard of any problems with the early Prius motors and a lot of them have more than 100,000 miles. It is comparing apples to oranges but my parents irrigation pumps are all electric and they last decades, working a lot more than a car motor will ever need to. One of the reasons the black helicopter people believe that GM shut down the EV1 is that electric motors would not need nearly as much service, thereby depriving GM of an important cash source. Personally, I believe that we should never rely on malevolence when sheer incompetence will suffice.


  17. 17
    Susan K

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    Jun 27th, 2007 (11:21 am)

    GM:

    Just passing along from my blog-comments section three requests for the Volt technology (plug-in vehicle with electric motor with only a TINY ICE just to top-up the battery while driving) or (extended range EV) EREV in a work truck.

    No fancy doo-dads, no silly machismo frills to feed the insecurity/vanity of the Ann Coulter SUV crowd, just give farmers and construction guys an EV truck for $25000.

    Phoenix is a bit too expensive for them: $45000/fleet only at this point. I hear you crashtest 10,000 vehicles a week. Would you PLEASE add a truck to that EREV platform.


  18. 18
    Matt986

     

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    Jun 27th, 2007 (12:56 pm)

    I think MM is a little off the point of the Volt. SURE, I believe battery technology will improve, and that maybe in 5 or 10 years, a battery might be able to get much greater range out of a vehicle like the Volt…

    … but the Volt will, as is, be a GREAT solution for a MAJORITY of commuters. Some might have to plug it in every night, but that’s a minor inconvenience to cut your transportation costs in half.

    For the 70-80% of Americans that commute less than 40 miles a day, the Volt with a 40 mile battery range will work fine on electric power only for those people, and can run on liquid fuel when needed.

    Whatever comes down the road will be fine for whatever vehicles they are used in, but the Volt will be fine as designed.


  19. 19
    MM

     

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    Jun 28th, 2007 (8:38 am)

    to siv and matt, I agree most people don’t do 500 miles a day but they WANT to able to do it anytime they wish and not be constrained to 60 miles a day, especialy if they’ll be paying a good amount of money for the car. Look at the numbers on why people are not crazy about electric cars, it’s mostly about the limited milieage and performances.

    I’m not saying people need to have a 500 miles a day car but in the current perpective most americans need to know they are ”FREE” to be able to go wherever and whenever they want.

    If you don’t agree with this point of view then ask yourself why people wouldn’t just save their money and take public transportation… Exactly it’s about convenience and the good old american right to ”freedom”.

    I might be mistaken matt but I believe the volt is meant to be a 100% electric and not a hybrid so you’re comment about ”and can run on liquid fuel when needed.” in this case is not relevent.

    Another tech that is comming out (mostly for electric super cars) is to have little gas motor that charges the battery as it needs it, that may be another way to go to get a little more mileage…


  20. 20
    Brian

     

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    Jun 28th, 2007 (8:47 am)

    Hi MM,

    Have you even read anything about the Volt? The estimated range of the Volt is OVER 600 MILES! It IS a series hybrid, and it CAN run on liquid fuel.

    The Volt runs on only battery power for the first 40 miles or so, and then the GASOLINE ENGINE kicks on to start recharging the batteries. The gasoline is not directly powering the car, but the car would have a very short range without it. GM has estimated that with a full battery charge and a full gasoline tank, the Volt would go more than 600 miles before needing to refuel.

    Please, next time you are going to talk about something you should at least know something about it first.


  21. 21
    MM

     

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    Jun 28th, 2007 (11:38 pm)

    Hey Brian, my appologies to all and especialy mat… I have read about the volt but my info was taken else where through articles that are ‘out’ there.

    I have since revised the GM web site info and specs on the volt. Much better then what was quoted else where, good luck to GM with the volt but I’ll most likely be buying a ZAP-X if it goes into production and matches the numbers the company proposes, it may come out in the next couple of years…

    http://www.zapworld.com/ZAPWorld.aspx?id=4560


  22. 22
    Matt986

     

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    Jun 29th, 2007 (12:51 pm)

    MM, I think I see the point you might have been trying to make, people DO want a good range out of their vehicles. Being limited to a very short range on batteries would kill the interest in an electric car really quick!

    But the Volt is more of a serial hybrid than an electric car. The two good aspects of it are that MOST people could commute off of the battery charge alone, and the other is that when they want to or need to drive further, they can easily do so using gasoline to power the onboard generator. Since the gasoline infrastructure is already built, it will be uber easy.

    The ZAP-X looks VERY nice, but I think it will be a tough sell since after that ~500 mile drive, you have to stop and plug in to recharge, probably for several hours. If it didn’t have an onboard genset, I wouldn’t buy one. Usually once a year, I make a 1000mi (one way) trip out to Arizona. I wouldn’t buy a vehicle that couldn’t do it without stopping for HOURS to charge. Many other people wouldn’t either. ;)


  23. 23
    MM

     

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    Jun 30th, 2007 (1:13 am)

    I agree matt, the volt would be a great serial hybrid and it’s a great start in getting off our gas dependance, I’m all for it! I would of course rather buy 100% electric if I could but we’ll see.

    BTW matt they say the ZAP-X will fully recharge itself in only 10 minutes, that would be great IF it’ll actually be that way when production starts.

    Anyways I like both the Volt and ZAP-X concept vehicals but only time will tell to see what the real world cars that actualy hit the streets will be like, things can change a lot to accomodate mass production…


  24. 24
    Matt986

     

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    Jun 30th, 2007 (11:12 am)

    MM,

    Charging the ZAP-X in 10 minutes would take special charging infrastructure. You simply couldn’t do that at home. The amount of current and energy needed is more than one can get from their home. You’d be looking at very long charge times from your 110v 20A sockets at home. Probably less with a 208v circuit, but still in the ‘several hours’ range.

    IIRC, someone calculated based on the Altair Nano 35kWh battery charging in 10 minutes… it had to take near 1000 Amps of current!

    A ’10 minute’ charge wouldn’t be possible until there are charging stations built that can provide that much power. They don’t exist right now.

    Maybe in the future, I’m all for it, but it will be a while. A ‘series hybrid’ setup for an electric powered car will be more practical in the shorter term. ;)


  25. 25
    Sell2lo

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    Jul 2nd, 2007 (7:49 pm)

    Why not make the Volt or any other PHEV available with an all electric range (AER) of 20, 30, 40, 50, or 60 miles? For a driver with a 20 mile round trip commute, an AER of 40 miles represents 100% excess battery capacity and cost. If you change your job or move, then add additional battery modules, as required.
    As for battery life, ten years is enough if one can add capacity, probably at a much lower cost per kWh than the original battery pack, as the pack weakens. Also, in ten years in sunny climes, it should be economic to stick (non-nerdy) solar cells on the Volt’s roof to recharge batteries and increase its effective AER.


  26. 26
    John FK

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    Jul 4th, 2007 (3:42 pm)

    @Susan K

    Who is ‘Ann Coulter’ and who are the ‘Ann Coulter SUV crowd’? Are these people neighbors of yours? What do these people look like and why are they so insecure? It sounds to me as if you must obsess about these people and be full of contempt and hate for them. So please tell me what they look like, I wish to avoid them.

    When one realizes you have just spoken out in such a bizarre manner following an article about batteries of all things one knows your life is being consumed with hate. Enjoy.


  27. 27
    Jean-Charles Jacquemin

     

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    Jul 6th, 2007 (1:51 pm)

    Please John FK, about Ann Coulter, look at this site :

    http://www.anncoulter.org/cgi-local/welcome.cgi

    Best regards


  28. 28
    Mahmoud

     

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    Jul 10th, 2007 (11:02 pm)

    Must agree with John FK – if Susan wants to see SUV, she should go to Al Gore’s lectures and checkout the parking lot. I have seen the picture. Its mostly SUVs. A woman’s hatred for another successful one, has no bounds.

    GM is being a real idiot trying to come up with 15 year batteries. This market is so huge, that they need to provide only 5 year batteries, and overtime increase it. They are assured humongous sales figures.

    They should concentrate on increasing range from 40 to 80 miles, and not worry so much for battery life. After all, which GM engine or transmission lasts 15 years of constant use or abuse?

    The A123 is already a 10 year battery, and I am sure if they chose this one, people will know that, even though the warranty is only for 5 years.

    I can only accuse GM when they say nonsense like this, that “their heart is not there”. They do not understand the EV market, and their powertrain people are trying to stop the Volt and other SPHEVs. Foot dragging is not how you run your business.

    I hope GM goes bankrupt soon, and Tesla/ZAP and others replace it.


  29. 29
    jabber_wolf

     

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    Jul 20th, 2007 (2:56 pm)

    Mahmoud,

    I’m not sure the Tesla/ZAP would be a big seller at 60,000 compared to the VOLT aiming at under half that- hopefully closer to 20k.

    The nano-phosphate lithium battery technology is apt at taking a 10 minute quick charge, if there were power stations able to deliver it. However, unless they sell an “additional battery” to sit at home and charge all the time with the ability to act as mini-powerstation for home use, the plug-in is the best bet. The quick charging also seems to reduce the number of cycles for the battery – limiting its life.

    I do think the 10 year life span is a good aim but that GM is trying to be very sure it can at least go the 10 year limit by aiming for 15.

    I do want to see an optional POWER pack that someone can flip a switch and get additional horsepower and get it to go 0-60 in under 4 seconds as a gimmick. Ya know, an additional a123 quick discharge battery? That shouldn’t be too hard and would be only a small addition, nothing like the larger main battery.

    Yes, not a very energy efficient request but I think it would make a huge difference by gaining an entirely new market or a migration from 1 to another. They need to show that the electric car not only is efficient, and eco-friendly, but can keep up and/or simply beat other cars on the road. This would mark a huge migration of users over to cars like the volt and be the beginning of the end of the common combustion engine car.

    I hope GM keeps this in mind as only American car companies seem to know the need for cheap accessible muscle cars.


  30. 30
    Allan H

     

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    Aug 8th, 2007 (12:27 pm)

    MM: This vehicle is not an EV it is a plug-in series hybrid. You charge it at home, when the battery gets down to 60% a small electric generator, (liquid fuel fed), or fuel cell kicks in to replenish the batteries which then feed power to an electric motor.

    Point one: If you need to do 3000 miles just buy fuel after the first forty miles and you are out of charge.

    Point two: If GM puts a small bio-diesel generator in the vehicle, you will be able to have your cake and eat it too. Bio-diesel has a zero co2 footprint, (if you use bio-diesel during the manufacturing process), and can be easily produced from rapeseed (canola), which is a cover crop, (unlike corn), and enriches the soil. Also, the energy in/out ratio on biodiesel can be as high as 1/16 where ethanol is actually a loser (1/.68).

    Magnificent strides have been made on batteries. We seem to be already where we NEED to be for commuting. We need to go with what we have, not wait for nirvana. Who knows, we may already be at the outer edge of battery technology.

    Remember when computers were making all those amazing gains in speed every six months. Well, we are now reaching the physical limits and speed gains are slowing. That’s just by way of saying don’t assume that you can put 1000 miles of juice into a battery. It may well prove impossible.

    GO WITH WHAT WE’VE GOT!


  31. 31
    bill nighy christmas

     

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    Oct 30th, 2007 (12:55 pm)

    bill nighy christmas…

    Man i love reading your blog, interesting posts !…


  32. 32
    Robert Ackerlind

     

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    Oct 30th, 2007 (1:56 pm)

    How can A123 Systems even be in business if a “prototype pack does not yet exist”.


  33. 33
    Jake Starling

     

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    Nov 14th, 2007 (8:08 pm)

    What about Altairnano’s non-graphite electrodes for this battery? I believe that the Altairnano battery would be superior to the A123 one:

    http://www.altairnano.com/documents/NanoSafeBackgrounder060920.pdf

    Hope someone can tell me that I’m correct in this “engineering gut feeling.”


  34. 34
    Marc

     

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    Dec 7th, 2007 (1:16 pm)

    I’ve enjoyed reading everyone’s comments on here!

    It is clear that battery technology improvements will come quickly, allowing for more energy density and battery life; and batteries designed to last, say, 10 years will be out-of-date by the time they expire. While this is good news, we are left with a few questions as how things will play out:

    How much time and money should be spent on extending the life of batteries that will be obsolete after 5 (or less) years? My argument – isn’t this electric car movement about saving money and the environment? We need to consider how massive the auto industry is (# cars/yr) to see that we will need to worry more about recycling the components of batteries. If it requires little money and materials to double the lifespan of a battery pack, then it will be worth the investment when you consider the alternative costs of recycling a battery pack and buying a new one. These batteries are ½ the value of the car, currently.

    Another issue is battery range. I find this issue to be less of a concern than most. A car with a 200-mile range on batteries (a lot for today’s standards) will be useless on long-distance drives. This will keep the gas-electric combination around for some time, as the infrastructure of gasoline stations will be around for a long time, and an onboard gas-powered generator (such as with the Volt) will give the vehicle an unlimited range, and it can have less batteries on board. Imagine you’re buying an electric car – one is the Volt, and the other is an “upgraded” Volt that has 4-times the battery range. This means the car will have 4x the number of batteries, and will cost about 2.5x as much as the Volt because of the cost for batteries. I think most consumers would much rather spend that extra money on luxuries and features for the car, or perhaps buy two Volts instead! You’ll always have that gasoline tank when you need the range.

    The same concept applies as battery technology advances – the hybrid feature is important when it comes to cost-savings. If most people need no more than a 50-mile range per day and can charge overnight, then as technology allows battery energy density to double, you can install HALF the batteries in the car – half the weight, half the materials, and half the cost (depending on what the new battery technology demands for materials). Today, batteries cost as much as the rest of the car’s components combined, so we can see how a hybrid option will allow us to keep costs and materials/weight down, while we still use mostly electric power to get around every day.

    As for me, I drive a motorcycle, so I’m waiting on the first hybrid motorbike to come to market!


  35. 35
    Tom

     

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    Jan 26th, 2008 (8:14 pm)

    One of the things that must be considered when purchasing solar electric panels for the home is what to do with excess electric. Currently many states require utilities to purchase excess from homeowners at about 1/5 consumer cost. With an electric vehicle parked at home (during daylight hours) a more cost effective option emerges. Perhaps these battery companies could make a safer battery for the solar powered home as well.

    Oh, and 15 year lifespan sounds desirable, but I wouldn’t waste too much time on it; Toyota has a huge headstart on General Motors when it comes to hybrid vehicles.


  36. [...] see my interviews with Bart Riley, CTO of A123 and Ric Fulop, A123 VP of [...]


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    Avis Mcguire

     

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    Apr 17th, 2008 (5:18 pm)

    cystocarp rodsman viticulture banjore winddog condition megalopidae ungum
    Simple Floors: Bamboo
    http://www.shakespearefestivalla.org/


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    Kabe

     

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    Apr 18th, 2008 (2:02 pm)

    Non-aqueous electrochemical storage systems like the Li-ion (all types) have the system-inherent inconvenience that they do not provide a catalytic recombination “emergency” reaction in case of overcharge as does the NiMH system. Series-connected multicell stacks (as now used in all HEVs) require to reduce significantly the DOD [depth of discharge] as to limit overcharge, with the consequence of increasing cost and reducing the effective available energy unless (expensive!) individual charge control on each cell is applied. – It is easy to request 10 or 15 years lifetime since nobody can prove this can happen and at what probability. I don’t know how to predict this for a system that has not shown its operation and reliability for at least 1000 units over 3 years. 5 years would be more realistic and not be too bad either. Safety and reliability is still an important issue of (all) Li-ion systems as emphasized in several recent conference meetings. – After more than 30 years engaged in battery R&D [inventor of the NiMH system] I tend to be less euphoric on certain battery performance and cycle life announcements.
    Kabe_BG (Ph.D.)


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    Tracking The Chevy Volt - KARL Chevrolet HUMMER

     

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    Jun 13th, 2008 (1:44 pm)

    [...] A123 [...]


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    tyli jvtoef

     

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    Jun 16th, 2008 (11:20 pm)

    wmgbq dzvljcf vdxsgbf svnochy aklxtfsg qaevtxup cyqnuz


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    Ralph

     

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    Jun 25th, 2008 (12:58 pm)

    While we stall getting the technology out the door, Congress is getting ready to pass bills that will limit who gets to speculate on oil.. The general concensus is that this should drop the price of oil to the $2 per gallon range.. Exactly what happened in the 70′s to cause the U.S. to not seriously look at other technology.. Look at Brasil otoh. They took that as a sign never to be dependent on oil, and went to ethanol. BTW, why are we taxing brazilian ethanol, and giving our farmers subsidies on corn ethanol?


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    DHoover

     

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    Jul 14th, 2008 (9:30 am)

    10 to 15years of battery use is great for the consumer and the dealer becuase the consumer can tradein the vehicle for a new model and provide the dealer with a model that they can resale without losing value in the battery. As far as Cobasys goes I hope that A123 is keep a private company and they don’t sell out to GM or Cobasys.. This would be the end of EV cars as we know it. Remember who owns Cobasys, “CHEVRON”. As far as a Fast Recharging Station goes, the last time I look every gas station has Electric power. The only addition would be to setup a charging station to the side. It would be a lot cheaper than setup up a Hydrogen station.


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    Kabe

     

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    Jul 17th, 2008 (7:00 pm)

    Don’t dream that a battery like Li-ion or NiMH can reach a lifetime of 10 to 15 years with at least 80% of initial capacity. Even at low discharge depth (DOD), little overcharge and 5 cycles per week 4 to 6 years would be a fair value. Anyhow, there are no real time data over this duration currently available and certainly no statistics. Electrochemical process insight indicates instability rather than stability of high energy storage reactions.
    KABE (Electrochemist – PhD)


  44. [...] A123 [...]


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    Casadore

     

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    Aug 21st, 2008 (12:59 pm)

    I like the thought of leasing the battery and when it wears out install a new one and continue paying a monthly lease.


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    David B.

     

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    Sep 19th, 2008 (4:57 pm)

    The electric motor that power the wheels are they brush- type ?


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    Bлacть

     

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    Jul 22nd, 2009 (3:35 am)

    А что Вы скажете, если я буду утверждать, что все Ваши посты, не более чем выдумка автора?


  48. 48
    тыия

     

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    Jul 28th, 2009 (9:59 am)

    Отличнейший и интересный блог! Стабильный житель моего РСС ридера :)


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    Pol88

     

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    Oct 22nd, 2009 (11:30 am)

    Bank spends or invests 30 back into the economy. ,


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    Pol35

     

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    Oct 23rd, 2009 (8:42 am)

    The psychology literature certainly has a lot to say about the topic, but economists have a rather simplistic view of the issue. ,